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Am I right in thinking that the Catholic faith does not recognise a marriage performed by a public celebrant as one that needs an annulment? If a person had a divorce from that marriage would a practicing Catholic be free to marry them in a Catholic ceremony?

07/03/2012 new

(Quote) CaterinaMaria-179344 said: Am I right in thinking that the Catholic faith does not recognise a marriage performed by...
(Quote) CaterinaMaria-179344 said:

Am I right in thinking that the Catholic faith does not recognise a marriage performed by a public celebrant as one that needs an annulment? If a person had a divorce from that marriage would a practicing Catholic be free to marry them in a Catholic ceremony?

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My understanding, from the extensive RCIA class (three hours) we had on the topic of annulment was that in the United States, it was not recognized but the application for a "simple" annulment must be completed so the Church had a record of this civil marriage in case any questions arose regarding the validity of any marriage following. Simple annulment applied for a few other cut-and-dry circumstances as well (age, pregnancy/pressure to marry, non-church (any) wedding performed by a Christian minister). That last one would refer to a hotel, resort, ship, or destination wedding where a Christian pastor celebrated the marriage but it wasn't in God's house, not a Christian marriage in a different denominational house of worship.

07/03/2012 new
(Quote) CaterinaMaria-179344 said: Am I right in thinking that the Catholic faith does not recognise a marriage performed by a public cele...
(Quote) CaterinaMaria-179344 said:

Am I right in thinking that the Catholic faith does not recognise a marriage performed by a public celebrant as one that needs an annulment? If a person had a divorce from that marriage would a practicing Catholic be free to marry them in a Catholic ceremony?

--hide--


Uhhh......it is a little bit more complicated. If a person was married before becoming Catholic, then that person would be bound by the laws of the state and the canon laws of any Christian community they were a part of, if any (for example, Eastern Orthdox require marriage before an EO priest).

If a person subsequently became Catholic, then if there is any dispute on validity, these would be used to judge the validity of the marriage.
07/04/2012 new

Thanks Lynn, that gives m a clearer understanding of it.

07/04/2012 new

Thanks Paul, the detail is important in this area.

07/05/2012 new

(Quote) Paul-302787 said: Uhhh......it is a little bit more complicated. If a person was married before becoming Catholic, ...
(Quote) Paul-302787 said:

Uhhh......it is a little bit more complicated. If a person was married before becoming Catholic, then that person would be bound by the laws of the state and the canon laws of any Christian community they were a part of, if any (for example, Eastern Orthdox require marriage before an EO priest).

If a person subsequently became Catholic, then if there is any dispute on validity, these would be used to judge the validity of the marriage.
--hide--



Thanks, Paul. The Sister may have been trying to simplify. I do know of many couples that never con-validated their marriage in the Church, who had a civil marriage by a judge, and their marriages were very easy to dissolve in this A-D. Another couple, not intending to continue to be Catholic, got married in a different Christian community, and had great difficulty with con-validation---the priest resisted heavily when they requested it.

07/05/2012 new

(Quote) Lynn-189934 said: Thanks, Paul. The Sister may have been trying to simplify. I do know of many couples t...
(Quote) Lynn-189934 said:




Thanks, Paul. The Sister may have been trying to simplify. I do know of many couples that never con-validated their marriage in the Church, who had a civil marriage by a judge, and their marriages were very easy to dissolve in this A-D. Another couple, not intending to continue to be Catholic, got married in a different Christian community, and had great difficulty with con-validation---the priest resisted heavily when they requested it.

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What does con-validate mean in your context? I have an annulment myself, but I have never heard this term used before.

07/05/2012 new

(Quote) Jim-624621 said: What does con-validate mean in your context? I have an annulment myself, but I have never heard...
(Quote) Jim-624621 said:


What does con-validate mean in your context? I have an annulment myself, but I have never heard this term used before.

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Convalidation is the canonical procedure for making valid a marriage that was invalid due to a lack of consent, an impediment, or a defect of form.

07/05/2012 new

(Quote) CaterinaMaria-179344 said: Am I right in thinking that the Catholic faith does not recognise a marriage performed by...
(Quote) CaterinaMaria-179344 said:

Am I right in thinking that the Catholic faith does not recognise a marriage performed by a public celebrant as one that needs an annulment? If a person had a divorce from that marriage would a practicing Catholic be free to marry them in a Catholic ceremony?

--hide--

If one of the parties to the original marriage was Catholic at the time of the marriage, this would appear to be a situation that qualifies for a lack of form annulment, which is usually a fairly quick (4-6 week) administrative process.

If neither party was Catholic the requirement for canonical form does not apply and a full annulment proceeding will be required before one party is free to marry a Catholic in the Church.

07/05/2012 new

(Quote) Paul-302787 said: Uhhh......it is a little bit more complicated. If a person was married before becoming Catholic, ...
(Quote) Paul-302787 said:

Uhhh......it is a little bit more complicated. If a person was married before becoming Catholic, then that person would be bound by the laws of the state and the canon laws of any Christian community they were a part of, if any (for example, Eastern Orthdox require marriage before an EO priest).

If a person subsequently became Catholic, then if there is any dispute on validity, these would be used to judge the validity of the marriage.
--hide--

When two non-Catholics marry, divorce, and one later wishes to marry a Catholic or converts to Catholicism and wishes to marry, they must go through the full annulment process. I don't know for sure whether another faith's requirements for form are considered by the tribunal (I've never seen this mentioned in the canons, but I may have overlooked it, or it may be an administrative rule), but in any case this is not handled as a lack of form process for a marriage where one party was Catholic.

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