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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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10/04/2012 new
(Quote) Gerald-283546 said: Don't feel too out of place. Just try living with a vegetarian for a while! Now that is really wei...
(Quote) Gerald-283546 said:



Don't feel too out of place. Just try living with a vegetarian for a while! Now that is really weird.

Many may not know that the early Church fasted every Wednesday and Friday. During the Middle Ages, that decreased to fasting every Friday, and all of Advent, Lent, and Ember Days. Somewhere in there we lost Wednesdays, Advent and Ember Days. Then after Vatican II, Friday fasts were thrown out and Lenten fasts reduced to just Fridays in Lent instead of all Lent, plus Ash Wed and Good Fri. Another fast we've forgotten is the fast from midnight until communion on Sunday. When my folks were growing up they had last call for drinks just before midnight in Catholic towns because anyone going to communion the next day had to stop drinking at midnight on Saturday....like cinderella. Perhaps, that is where the fairy tale had its origen? That was reduced to 3 hours and then 1 hour after VII, so that now there is essentially no fast except you have to finish breakfast 15 minutes before you leave for Mass and can't eat during the service...although I saw gum chewing last sunday. But, I digress.

People also forget that fasting often included fasting from sex in the olden days. Made Lent rather long, I gather!

Anyway, don't feel bad about keeping up an old tradition. You are setting a good example for the rest of us.

--hide--


On Sunday morning, I eat nothing until after mass. I agree that "Break Fast" should be the meal after Holy Communion. Fasting is something you add over time to the little sacrifices that you do for the Lord. And no one has to know that you are fasting when you are doing it.

biggrin
10/04/2012 new
(Quote) Gerald-283546 said: Don't feel too out of place. Just try living with a vegetarian for a while! Now that is really wei...
(Quote) Gerald-283546 said:



Don't feel too out of place. Just try living with a vegetarian for a while! Now that is really weird.

Many may not know that the early Church fasted every Wednesday and Friday. During the Middle Ages, that decreased to fasting every Friday, and all of Advent, Lent, and Ember Days. Somewhere in there we lost Wednesdays, Advent and Ember Days. Then after Vatican II, Friday fasts were thrown out and Lenten fasts reduced to just Fridays in Lent instead of all Lent, plus Ash Wed and Good Fri. Another fast we've forgotten is the fast from midnight until communion on Sunday. When my folks were growing up they had last call for drinks just before midnight in Catholic towns because anyone going to communion the next day had to stop drinking at midnight on Saturday....like cinderella. Perhaps, that is where the fairy tale had its origen? That was reduced to 3 hours and then 1 hour after VII, so that now there is essentially no fast except you have to finish breakfast 15 minutes before you leave for Mass and can't eat during the service...although I saw gum chewing last sunday. But, I digress.

People also forget that fasting often included fasting from sex in the olden days. Made Lent rather long, I gather!

Anyway, don't feel bad about keeping up an old tradition. You are setting a good example for the rest of us.

--hide--


I am a revert of 15 years (this Sunday!! Oct. 7, Yay!) and I was away from the no-meat-on-Fridays scene for awhile. When I came back into the Church, I participated in a Sunday Missal study on Friday nights. Each night, we went out to eat afterward and it was such a gift to me that all my friends followed the no-meat regime. It made it easier for me to get back into the swing of it.

Four years ago, I started going to the Eastern Greek Melkite Catholic Church in my area. The Melkites are more rigorous in this arena, in terms of frequency of practice, and at the same time, they are less rigorous, in that they do not view the overall practice in legal terms. That is, "All who wish to follow the Churchs plan for fasting are encouraged to keep these days, but there are no laws concerning them."

Abstaining means to go without all meat all day.

Melkites abstain:

- Wednesdays and Fridays of each week, with the exception of weeks after Christmas, after Pentecost, and the days of Eastertide.

- Fasting means to go without all meat and dairy from midnight until noon or Vespers.

Melkites fast:

a) For each Divine Liturgy (akin to Mass), from midnight to before receiving Holy Communion

b) Daily Monday through Friday during Lent

c) All of Holy Week

d) The eves of Christmas and Theophany

e) The Twelve Great Feast Days throughout the year, e.g., Feast of the Nativity, Feast of Theotokos (Mary), Feast of Pentecost, etc.

Eastern Churches do not view fasting in legal terms, however. So, "All who want to follow the Churchs plan for fasting are encouraged to keep these days, but there are no laws concerning them."

Kathleen

The above comes from this site: home.comcast.net
10/04/2012 new
(Quote) Kathleen-878558 said: I am a revert of 15 years (this Sunday!! Oct. 7, Yay!) and I was away from the no-meat-on-Fridays scene...
(Quote) Kathleen-878558 said:

I am a revert of 15 years (this Sunday!! Oct. 7, Yay!) and I was away from the no-meat-on-Fridays scene for awhile. When I came back into the Church, I participated in a Sunday Missal study on Friday nights. Each night, we went out to eat afterward and it was such a gift to me that all my friends followed the no-meat regime. It made it easier for me to get back into the swing of it.



Four years ago, I started going to the Eastern Greek Melkite Catholic Church in my area. The Melkites are more rigorous in this arena, in terms of frequency of practice, and at the same time, they are less rigorous, in that they do not view the overall practice in legal terms. That is, "All who wish to follow the Churchs plan for fasting are encouraged to keep these days, but there are no laws concerning them."



Abstaining means to go without all meat all day.



Melkites abstain:



- Wednesdays and Fridays of each week, with the exception of weeks after Christmas, after Pentecost, and the days of Eastertide.



- Fasting means to go without all meat and dairy from midnight until noon or Vespers.



Melkites fast:



a) For each Divine Liturgy (akin to Mass), from midnight to before receiving Holy Communion



b) Daily Monday through Friday during Lent



c) All of Holy Week



d) The eves of Christmas and Theophany



e) The Twelve Great Feast Days throughout the year, e.g., Feast of the Nativity, Feast of Theotokos (Mary), Feast of Pentecost, etc.



Eastern Churches do not view fasting in legal terms, however. So, "All who want to follow the Churchs plan for fasting are encouraged to keep these days, but there are no laws concerning them."



Kathleen



The above comes from this site: home.comcast.net
--hide--


From the Melkite Eparchy web site (the more detailed description):

"Abstinence is refraining from eating meat, dairy products, eggs, alcohol, fish and olive oil."

(Lots of beans and grains get eaten....)

"The idea of 'fasting and abstinence' is to gain self control, a simplification of life-style, a solidarity with the poor and hungry, and to return to Paradise. As such fasting and abstinence should always be focused towards making life simpler not more complicated."

- melkite.org
10/04/2012 new

Matt,

I am Vegetarian and Vegan at times, and so everyday is a meatless day. I haven't had any problems being so. I don't bring attention to it when eating with others, although those I spend time with realize this sooner or later. I don't mind the jokes or teasing either. It just isn't a big deal to me.

Fridays and Lent are times when I have to get more creative!

Most people like to order meatless meals nowadays so it isn't or shouldn't be a big deal to others. It is a preferance. I would not bring attention to myself but if someone asked, then I would tell them or that you prefer a meatless meal today.

10/04/2012 new

(Quote) Gerald-283546 said: (Quote) Matt-849404 said: Hello Catholic Match "Forumers"! ...
(Quote) Gerald-283546 said:

Quote:
Matt-849404 said:

Hello Catholic Match "Forumers"!

I just wanted to put something out there and see what other Catholics think of Abstinence. I am a Traditional Catholic and I follow the traditional rules of the Catholic Church, which includes abstaining from meat on every Friday of the year, not just in Lent.

When I go out to eat or something with friends on a Friday, and I won't order or eat anything with meat, it raises the question, and when I tell them I don't eat meat on Friday, they look at me like I have lobsters crawling out of my ears! Lol! There's usually one person who will make the obvious statement: It's not Lent.

They just can't believe that I go without eating meat every Friday of the year, like it's that much of a sacrifice that it's just unthinkable.

So I just wanted to see what other Catholics on here think of Abstinence from meat on Fridays, or if I'm the only one that follows this anymore. (Not that it will matter in the slightest if I am, I'll still do what I know is right.)




Don't feel too out of place. Just try living with a vegetarian for a while! Now that is really weird.

Many may not know that the early Church fasted every Wednesday and Friday. During the Middle Ages, that decreased to fasting every Friday, and all of Advent, Lent, and Ember Days. Somewhere in there we lost Wednesdays, Advent and Ember Days. Then after Vatican II, Friday fasts were thrown out and Lenten fasts reduced to just Fridays in Lent instead of all Lent, plus Ash Wed and Good Fri. Another fast we've forgotten is the fast from midnight until communion on Sunday. When my folks were growing up they had last call for drinks just before midnight in Catholic towns because anyone going to communion the next day had to stop drinking at midnight on Saturday....like cinderella. Perhaps, that is where the fairy tale had its origen? That was reduced to 3 hours and then 1 hour after VII, so that now there is essentially no fast except you have to finish breakfast 15 minutes before you leave for Mass and can't eat during the service...although I saw gum chewing last sunday. But, I digress.

People also forget that fasting often included fasting from sex in the olden days. Made Lent rather long, I gather!

Anyway, don't feel bad about keeping up an old tradition. You are setting a good example for the rest of us.

--hide--


Fasting from sex during Lent? So different. My understanding is that part of the Sabbath for Jews has engaging in relations with spouse. Hmmm. I guess I can picture this restriction though it seems ...like too much.

10/04/2012 new

(Quote) John-842063 said: look at you as if you had lobsters crawling out of your ears.... Matthew 6:18 "(But when you ...
(Quote) John-842063 said:

look at you as if you had lobsters crawling out of your ears.... Matthew 6:18 "(But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face)


I had for several years given up meat for lent- all of lent, (meat, seafood, cheese, fried food)
and a friend asked me "and you lived?"

--hide--

So you ate tofu and beans? This would be good for one's circulatory system

10/04/2012 new

I too always fast on Fridays, I have done ever since I can remember. As others have said, it can be different when eating out with others, for example, I was at a Carrabean restaurant a few weeks back and orederd non meat startes and mains (a lovely curried butternut squash!). Afterwards, the waitress asked if I was vegetarian, but keeping the real reason to myself I said "No, I just like to try different things when eating out". I guess I should have said the real reason, it may have made for good conversation!

10/04/2012 new

I don't eat meat on Fridays either but I generally don't mention anything unless I need too. Like last year when I was working registration at a retreat and my friend went to get me dinner since I couldn't go get it myself so I told her make sure it didn't have meat because I abstain on Fridays since she's also Catholic she had no problem with it although she doesn't abstain herself.

10/04/2012 new

Thanks to everyone for posting, I just wanted to put this out there since it seems like some people think I get embarrassed about my choice to abstain from meat on Fridays. I really just wanted to hear from other Catholics on what their thoughts were about it. I wanted to clarify that I am not in any sort of quandary or thinking about abandoning my decision to practice it.

I am surprised at how many responses I got on this subject, and how varied they are.

10/04/2012 new

(Quote) Marian-83994 said:So you ate tofu and beans? This would be good for one's circulatory system
(Quote) Marian-83994 said:So you ate tofu and beans? This would be good for one's circulatory system
--hide--


Oh we could talk about that for a long time, but no, I know the body does not need the extra protein, I
go with mostly vegetables and whatever else is on the menu lot of non meat pasta and soup if I am cooking.
I did not do it last year as a couple friends just did not want to cook their usual food if I was abstaining-
they asked me to give up something else so I did

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