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A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for supportive and informative discussion about divorce and/or the annulment process. All posters must have been previously divorced or annulled.

Saint Eugene De Mazenod is patron of dysfunctional families & Saint Fabiola obtained a divorce from her first husband prior to devoting her life to charitable works.
Learn More: Saint Eugene De Mazenod and Saint Fabiola

10/29/2012 new

(Quote) Liberacion-894835 said: (Quote) Jerry-74383 said: If you wish to marry in the Church, an annu...
(Quote) Liberacion-894835 said:

Quote:
Jerry-74383 said:

If you wish to marry in the Church, an annulment is required. If you even think it is a possibility, it's better to go through the process sooner rather than later: if you have to go through the full process it can take a fair amount of time, which will seem like an eternity if you are holding off on a relationship waiting for it.


Yes Jerry, if you are in a relationship and are deciding for a church wedding, that will speed up the process.

--hide--

The pressing circumstances may get the case moved to the top of the stack and started sooner; however, the investigations, waiting for responses, interviews, etc. take time -- potentially a lot of time, depending on the circumstances. Showing up at the last minute and crying isn't going to change any of that.

10/29/2012 new

(Quote) Donna-83441 said: Many people here will stop reading a profile that says 'Divorced' with no reference to...
(Quote) Donna-83441 said:


Many people here will stop reading a profile that says 'Divorced' with no reference to an annulment in process.

--hide--

What Donna says is true, but the behavior is not very logical unless one is dealing with a lack of form case. "In progress" means nothing and is no guarantee the annulment petition will be approved: the risk is exactly the same as when the process hasn't been started; the only difference is that the decision may come in less time.

10/31/2012 new
Hence the reason at least some of us wont seriously date until this process is complete. My souls important to me as is yours and everyone elses. I Would not want to put it in danger!
10/31/2012 new

Thank you for your full and detail information. I am sure it will benefit a lot of people.

10/31/2012 new

I meant to Ray. Thank you, For your answer.

11/06/2012 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: An annulment is a determination and declaration by the Church (in the sense we are speaking of here...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

An annulment is a determination and declaration by the Church (in the sense we are speaking of here), that the marriage was lacking a requirement to have it considered a sacramental marriage.

--hide--

The majority of Ray's response is right on the money. There is one technical point in the above statement that is not correct in some cases. The word 'sacramental' is best replaced by the word 'valid' for the reason described below.

The term annulment is misleading because it can be interpreted as a verb -- that a change is being made to the state of a marriage. As Ray explained, this is not correct. The formal term for an annulment is a decree of nullity, a term which better expresses that a determination of the state of the marriage is being made.

A valid marriage (i.e., one for which no declaration of nullity can be issued) may exist between any man and woman, regardless of faith or baptismal status, who meet the requirements and for whom no impediment exist.

When a marriage between two baptized Christians is valid it is always sacramental; however, when one or both spouses is not baptized the marriage may be valid but is never sacramental. Thus, Ray's statement is accurate only for marriages between two baptized Christians.

Clear as mud?

11/06/2012 new

So Jerry, if I wade through the mud scratchchin , does that mean that since my ex was not a baptized Christian, I don't need an annulment?

11/06/2012 new

(Quote) Betsy-904124 said: So Jerry, if I wade through the mud , does that mean that since my ex was not a baptized Christia...
(Quote) Betsy-904124 said:

So Jerry, if I wade through the mud , does that mean that since my ex was not a baptized Christian, I don't need an annulment?

--hide--


You will still need an annulment, but it may fall under 'Lack of Canonical Form' That is best answered by contacting your local Tribunal.

11/06/2012 new

(Quote) Betsy-904124 said: So Jerry, if I wade through the mud , does that mean that since my ex was not a baptized Christia...
(Quote) Betsy-904124 said:

So Jerry, if I wade through the mud , does that mean that since my ex was not a baptized Christian, I don't need an annulment?

--hide--

Because your spouse was not a baptized Christian the marriage was not sacramental; it may or may not have been valid. The annulment process will determine this.

Any person who has ever been married in the past, regardless of their faith or baptismal status or where/how the marriage was conducted, needs an annulment to marry in the Catholic Church unless the previous spouse is now deceased.

If you were Catholic at the time of the marriage and were married outside the Church without a dispensation for canonical form, you may be able to go through the lack of form annulment process, which is very quick (often 4-6 weeks). If you were married in the Church or you were not Catholic at the time, lack of canonical form most likely won't apply and you will need to go through the full process.

11/06/2012 new

Betsy,

Speaking from personal experience, Jerry from Oklahoma knows the score. I use the term annulment but again Jerry is correct as it is a Declaration of Nullity. In fact, he knows far more than the folks I dealt with through my parish. I had to learn everything on my own by attending annulment workshops.

Another good point Jerry made - if you are in progress means you are not annulled. In progress can mean to having but not yet completing the forums to submitting the appropriate forms and awaiting a response.

My formal petition was initially denied. I did not have the witnesses to support my petition. I won't go into all the details on how I finally got it approved but I would suggest starting the process as soon as possible and get as many witnesses as possible. Out of five potential witnesses, only two would respond and those two did everything but answer the questions. It took 18 months to finally get my approved. I was told by a Tribunal member of the Archdiocese of Galveston/Houston, 15 to 20% of formal petitions are denied. We have one of the largest dioceses in the country and annually they received several thousand forms of all types.

Jerry, as just one poster, I appreciate the knowledge you share on this most important topic. For some who may be considering a long-term relationship or dating steady, in my opinion - you are walking on thin ice with your salvation without an approved annulment.


Blessings, Praying hug rose

Leon

Posts 11 - 20 of 41