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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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eyepopping That's me with my ignorant face on. biggrin Being a recent convert, could someone please tell me what happens if you meet, fall in love with, and decide to marry someone of a different denomination? Say, oh, for example, Baptist.

A. Do I get kicked out of the church? wink Just kidding. But, is it frowned upon?


B. What you decided you wanted to marry this person? Is there some kind of procedure where you can marry outside the Faith, but still take vows in your church? Or are you forever giving up the idea of getting married in the Catholic Church?


It really makes a difference to me, so I suppose I need to know if it is worth meeting the person if it goes in any way against those confirmation vows. rolling eyes

Nov 13th 2012 new
I doubt you will get kicked out. I seem to remember that both need to be Catholic for a wedding vows and mass. For just the vows at the altar (no mass), only one needs to be Catholic, I think.
Nov 13th 2012 new
You are bound by Baptism to abide by the marriage laws of the Church.

To marry outside of Catholicism you would need to receive a dispensation from your Bishop.

Hope this helps!
Nov 13th 2012 new

I believe that the Catechism talks about this. Well let's look it up. Paragraphs 1633 through 1637 address this. I'll write the first sentence of 1634, "Difference of confession between the spouses does not constitute an insurmountable obstacle for marriage, when they succeed in placing in common what they have received from their respective communities, and learn from each other the way in which each lives in fidelity to Christ."

I would recommend reading the whole section. It is not frowned upon, but it doesn't present different challenges, such as having to attend Mass on Sundays, baptizing the children as infants and raising them as Catholics.

I have a friend who was not Catholic, but took his wife and daughter to Mass every Sunday. After 13 years of going to Mass every week, he ended up converting. It is absolutely doable, but it does require more discernment and a clear understanding by the other party of what being married to a Catholic is all about.

God Bless,

Will

Nov 13th 2012 new

(Quote) Celia-821539 said: That's me with my ignorant face on. Being a recent convert, could someone please tell me what...
(Quote) Celia-821539 said:

That's me with my ignorant face on. Being a recent convert, could someone please tell me what happens if you meet, fall in love with, and decide to marry someone of a different denomination? Say, oh, for example, Baptist.

A. Do I get kicked out of the church? Just kidding. But, is it frowned upon?


B. What you decided you wanted to marry this person? Is there some kind of procedure where you can marry outside the Faith, but still take vows in your church? Or are you forever giving up the idea of getting married in the Catholic Church?


It really makes a difference to me, so I suppose I need to know if it is worth meeting the person if it goes in any way against those confirmation vows.

--hide--


And, if the person is divorced, they will need to go through an annullment in the Catholic Church (unless the ex-spouse is deceased). These annullments seem to be particularly difficult to get and most non- Catholics do not understand the process and do not want to go through it. So, that pretty much limits one to someone who is never married or widowed (and not previously divorced).

However, I do think it is better to be "equally yoked" as it is much easier to grow in the Catholic Faith with someone who is equally Catholic.

Nov 13th 2012 new
(Quote) Patricia-29176 said: And, if the person is divorced, they will need to go through an annullment in the Catholic Church (un...
(Quote) Patricia-29176 said:



And, if the person is divorced, they will need to go through an annullment in the Catholic Church (unless the ex-spouse is deceased). These annullments seem to be particularly difficult to get and most non- Catholics do not understand the process and do not want to go through it. So, that pretty much limits one to someone who is never married or widowed (and not previously divorced).

However, I do think it is better to be "equally yoked" as it is much easier to grow in the Catholic Faith with someone who is equally Catholic.

--hide--


Your last paragraph said it well
Nov 13th 2012 new

(Quote) Patricia-29176 said: And, if the person is divorced, they will need to go through an annullment in the Catho...
(Quote) Patricia-29176 said:



And, if the person is divorced, they will need to go through an annullment in the Catholic Church (unless the ex-spouse is deceased). These annullments seem to be particularly difficult to get and most non- Catholics do not understand the process and do not want to go through it. So, that pretty much limits one to someone who is never married or widowed (and not previously divorced).

However, I do think it is better to be "equally yoked" as it is much easier to grow in the Catholic Faith with someone who is equally Catholic.

--hide--

Agreed

Nov 13th 2012 new

My parents were married in the church in 1971. My mom is Catholic. My dad was not. He did agree to raise us Catholic and of course him and mom met with the priest who married them many times before the wedding. While my dad never converted before his death, he did believe in the churches teachings and even said the Rosary. I also have a cousin with a similar story. I don't believe the church looks down on it as long as you still follow the teachings of the church. Having someone who supports your Catholic faith and even shares the same beliefs of course makes things easier in my opinion.

Nov 13th 2012 new

(Quote) Chris-280015 said: I doubt you will get kicked out. I seem to remember that both need to be Catholic for a wedding vows and...
(Quote) Chris-280015 said: I doubt you will get kicked out. I seem to remember that both need to be Catholic for a wedding vows and mass. For just the vows at the altar (no mass), only one needs to be Catholic, I think.
--hide--
A Catholic marrying a non-Catholic in a Catholic Church may have a Mass with vows. It's not a problem.

Nov 13th 2012 new

(Quote) Celia-821539 said: That's me with my ignorant face on. Being a recent convert, could someone please tell me what...
(Quote) Celia-821539 said:

That's me with my ignorant face on. Being a recent convert, could someone please tell me what happens if you meet, fall in love with, and decide to marry someone of a different denomination? Say, oh, for example, Baptist.

A. Do I get kicked out of the church? Just kidding. But, is it frowned upon?


B. What you decided you wanted to marry this person? Is there some kind of procedure where you can marry outside the Faith, but still take vows in your church? Or are you forever giving up the idea of getting married in the Catholic Church?


It really makes a difference to me, so I suppose I need to know if it is worth meeting the person if it goes in any way against those confirmation vows.

--hide--
If you follow Catholic procedures, you'll find that you'll remain in good standing with the Church, which, I assume is your intention. Get kicked out?

What you ask can involve specific circumstances that will dictate the proper course of action. The decision about what you're asking is up to the bishop. There are circumstances by which you can have a legitimate, sacramental wedding outside of the Church, but there has to be a valid reason for it. Also, the setting must be appropriate -- for example, having it in a backyard rose garden is more appropriate than having it at an amusement park.

The Church recognizes that people of other faiths share many of the same values as we do, and allows what used to be called "mixed marriages" (one party Catholic; the other, not). This is typically not a problem, and by getting married in a Catholic Church, the pastor can handle the details.

Keep in mind the importance of respecting each other's faith beliefs. Having yours mocked or made fun of is not a good sign. Legitimate inquiries, or perhaps some classes to get educated about our Faith would be helpful to develop a better understanding. One can always hope and pray for a conversion, but you can't always count on that happening. A Catholic will need to show his/her spouse by example and practice.

Patricia brought up the potential problem of a divorced person. You didn't mention that, but it's a possible wrinkle to be ironed out. The disposition of any prior marriages (civil or religious) must be resolved by the Church in order to marry in it.

Hope this helps.

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