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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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Nov 13th 2012 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: A Catholic marrying a non-Catholic in a Catholic Church may have a Mass with vows. It's not a p...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

A Catholic marrying a non-Catholic in a Catholic Church may have a Mass with vows. It's not a problem.

--hide--

Marriage between a Catholic and a baptized non-Catholic may be celebrated within the context of the Eucharist (i.e., in a nuptial Mass) only with the permission of the local ordinary; marriage between a Catholic and a non-baptized person may never be within the context of the Eucharist. In either of these cases, one of the ceremonies from "Rite for Celebrating Marriage Outside Mass" may be used.

Nov 13th 2012 new
(Quote) Celia-821539 said: That's me with my ignorant face on. Being a recent convert, could someone please tell me what happens if...
(Quote) Celia-821539 said:

That's me with my ignorant face on. Being a recent convert, could someone please tell me what happens if you meet, fall in love with, and decide to marry someone of a different denomination? Say, oh, for example, Baptist.

A. Do I get kicked out of the church? Just kidding. But, is it frowned upon?


B. What you decided you wanted to marry this person? Is there some kind of procedure where you can marry outside the Faith, but still take vows in your church? Or are you forever giving up the idea of getting married in the Catholic Church?


It really makes a difference to me, so I suppose I need to know if it is worth meeting the person if it goes in any way against those confirmation vows.

--hide--


Celia, All you need is permission from the Church and also the Catholic party must promise to raise the children Catholic! But hopefully, the Baptist party will convert! You may also be married in your spouse's baptist church with the Catholic Church's permission. Your priest may be present.
Nov 13th 2012 new

Hi Celia,


I think that I can provide some insight here. I have five brothers and one sister. This has occured in our family.


I would recommend that you check out the catechism as it addresses this issue. Read #1633 - #1637:

> www.vatican.va



Concerning "A" - It isn't really "frowned upon", but the Church does recognize that there are some additional serious challenges that must be dealt with.... less so between spouses of differing christian faiths and more so when one is christian and the other is not baptized.


Concerning "B" - I believe that dispensation is required from your bishop, but I am sure that there would be a rather straight-forward procedure for this because it is a fairly common situation. You would also be obligated to do everything within your power to ensure that any children would be raised in the Catholic faith. One of my brothers is married to a Methodist woman. They were actually married in her Methodist church building. My uncle (a Catholic priest) co-officiated the wedding with the Methodist minister to that it was OK with the Catholic church. My sister married a man whom is either not baptized or perhaps was baptized but not really practicing his faith (not sure). They were married in a Catholic church with a Catholic ceremony by my uncle (the Catholic priest). Two of my brothers married christian women (both in the Catholic church building) who converted to Catholicism either shortly before or shortly after their wedding.


Hope this is useful.


Ed



Nov 13th 2012 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: A Catholic marrying a non-Catholic in a Catholic Church may have a Mass with vows. It's not a p...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

A Catholic marrying a non-Catholic in a Catholic Church may have a Mass with vows. It's not a problem.

--hide--


Thanks Ray for saying "here's how" instead of "here's why not".


They are both things to consider, but why do somany CMers focus the the why nots instead of the reasons it can work?

Nov 13th 2012 new

He is a Baptist. He is divorced - his wife had multpile affairs. His best friend is Catholic, so he understands. I'm just considering a second date right now.

Nov 14th 2012 new

My first husband was not Catholic, and we had a mass at our wedding. It lasted for almost 24 years until we were parted by death.

Nov 14th 2012 new

(Quote) Celia-821539 said: He is a Baptist. He is divorced - his wife had multpile affairs. His best friend is Catholic, so ...
(Quote) Celia-821539 said:

He is a Baptist. He is divorced - his wife had multpile affairs. His best friend is Catholic, so he understands. I'm just considering a second date right now.

--hide--
Go on the 2nd Date Celia; Take one date/ day at a time; (you can gather info later) you have nothing to loose; Good luck with your new relationship! Mike "peace"!!

Nov 14th 2012 new

(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: Celia, All you need is permission from the Church and also the Catholic party must promise to rai...
(Quote) Khoa-813439 said:

Celia, All you need is permission from the Church and also the Catholic party must promise to raise the children Catholic! But hopefully, the Baptist party will convert! You may also be married in your spouse's baptist church with the Catholic Church's permission. Your priest may be present.
--hide--

Both parties must agree to raise any children Catholic. The non-catholic must also promise not to put up barriers of any kind to the Catholic practising their faith.

Nov 14th 2012 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: Thanks Ray for saying "here's how" instead of "here's why not".
(Quote) David-364112 said:


Thanks Ray for saying "here's how" instead of "here's why not".


They are both things to consider, but why do somany CMers focus the the why nots instead of the reasons it can work?

--hide--

Because, David, the Church is the authority on these matters. She has restrictions for good reason: to guide us in situations which may pose a risk to our eternal salvation. While the Church does permit marriages of mixed faiths/disparity of cult, she clearly does so with reservations, as expressed in the Catechism and evidenced by the requirement for approval by an ecclesiastical authority.

Why focus on the why nots? In this case, because that was how the original poster's (OP) question was framed. In other cases it may be to present a more balanced picture because either the OP or the respondents have covered one side. In yet others it may be because one side represents a moral or spiritual error.

We as individuals, and society as a whole, would be in far better shape if we were in the habit of asking Why should I do this? How does it bring me closer to God? And accepting the Church's guidance (meaning the Magisterium, not individual clergy) rather than asking "Why not?" and then doing our best to reject every argument presented in response.

Nov 14th 2012 new

(Quote) Celia-821539 said: He is a Baptist. He is divorced - his wife had multpile affairs. His best friend is Catholic, so ...
(Quote) Celia-821539 said:

He is a Baptist. He is divorced - his wife had multpile affairs. His best friend is Catholic, so he understands. I'm just considering a second date right now.

--hide--

He will require a divorce. Unless his ex-wife was Catholic and they married outside the Church without a dispensation it will have to be a full annulment, which could be a very lengthy process without any guarantee of the petition being granted.

Dating with romantic intentions (or being open to a romance developing) when either party is divorced without an annulment is a very dangerous game. Many people get involved in such situations thinking they can easily wait for the annulment or break things off if it is rejected and end up marrying outside the Church and not only cutting themselves off from the sacraments, but committing a long chain of mortal sins.

Is it worth the risk?

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