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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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11/17/2012 new

(Quote) MaryAlice-97161 said:....We receive The Holy Eucharist while kneeling at the altar rail, there are no altar girls, and no l...
(Quote) MaryAlice-97161 said:....We receive The Holy Eucharist while kneeling at the altar rail, there are no altar girls, and no lay ministers. We have four priests and a cadre of some 90 altar boys.

So, Eric, if you ever find yourself traveling to Columbus, Ohio, look up St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic Church ... you will be very blessed.

--hide--


You have *4* priests? In this day and time that is rare. This is a normal diocesan parish? You are blessed indeed. And thanks for the tip about St. John Chrysostom -- Columbus is about 4 hours away but if I'm ever there then I'll check it out.

11/17/2012 new

Hi John,

I'm Roman Catholic and I don't really know much about other rites. Please could you tell me some of the main differences?

Thanks

11/18/2012 new
(Quote) Ebele-917776 said: Hi John, I'm Roman Catholic and I don't really know much about other rites. Please could...
(Quote) Ebele-917776 said:

Hi John,



I'm Roman Catholic and I don't really know much about other rites. Please could you tell me some of the main differences?



Thanks

--hide--


Some rites cross themselves "backwards". They use leavened Hosts for Holy Eucharist. Priests can be married prior to ordination. Vestment colors are different (blue isn't used in the Roman rite)

In the Byzantine Ruthenian rite on the feast day of John the Baptist, they abstain from eating foods in the shape of a head (apples, cabbage, etc.) nor do they eat anything on a plate.

Hope this helps
11/18/2012 new
The Catholic Church is made up of 22 particular churches that are united in a common faith but differ in liturgical practice based on their cultural heritage.

There are five basic liturgical families.

1)Byzantine (Consisting of the Ruthenians, Melkites, Romanians, Ukrainians, etc.) If it says Catholic in the name it's in union with Rome. Those that are Eastern Orthodox are NOT in union with Rome.

2) Antiochene (Consisting of the Maronites, Syriacs and Syro-Malankaras in India)

3) Armenian

4) Alexandria (Consisting of the Copts and Ethiopians)

5) East Syrian (Consisting of the Chaldeans and Syro-Malabars)

Plus, some of our eparchies have married priests. The Eastern Churches have preserved a lot of customs that have fallen into disuse in the West such as baptism by trine immersion, 6 weeks for Advent instead of 4 weeks, celebrating All Saints Day in the spring and the use of leavened bread in the Eucharist among others.

The following video shows the difference between the Masses of the Byzantine rite and modern Roman rite. www.youtube.com

It shows a Russian Orthodox celebration (Not in union with Rome), which is similar to what Byzantine Catholics do.
12/05/2012 new

(Quote) Gustavo-764558 said: Some rites cross themselves "backwards". They use leavened Hosts for Holy Eucharist....
(Quote) Gustavo-764558 said:

Some rites cross themselves "backwards". They use leavened Hosts for Holy Eucharist. Priests can be married prior to ordination. Vestment colors are different (blue isn't used in the Roman rite)

In the Byzantine Ruthenian rite on the feast day of John the Baptist, they abstain from eating foods in the shape of a head (apples, cabbage, etc.) nor do they eat anything on a plate.

Hope this helps
--hide--

Hmmm very interesting. Yes it helped.

12/05/2012 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: The Catholic Church is made up of 22 particular churches that are united in a common faith but differ in ...
(Quote) John-220051 said: The Catholic Church is made up of 22 particular churches that are united in a common faith but differ in liturgical practice based on their cultural heritage.

There are five basic liturgical families.

1)Byzantine (Consisting of the Ruthenians, Melkites, Romanians, Ukrainians, etc.) If it says Catholic in the name it's in union with Rome. Those that are Eastern Orthodox are NOT in union with Rome.

2) Antiochene (Consisting of the Maronites, Syriacs and Syro-Malankaras in India)

3) Armenian

4) Alexandria (Consisting of the Copts and Ethiopians)

5) East Syrian (Consisting of the Chaldeans and Syro-Malabars)

Plus, some of our eparchies have married priests. The Eastern Churches have preserved a lot of customs that have fallen into disuse in the West such as baptism by trine immersion, 6 weeks for Advent instead of 4 weeks, celebrating All Saints Day in the spring and the use of leavened bread in the Eucharist among others.

The following video shows the difference between the Masses of the Byzantine rite and modern Roman rite. www.youtube.com

It shows a Russian Orthodox celebration (Not in union with Rome), which is similar to what Byzantine Catholics do.
--hide--

Thanks. that was very informative. I had no idea there were rites that allowed married priests. Are they married before they start the process of becoming priests? or during?

12/05/2012 new

(Quote) MaryAlice-97161 said: When I first came here, to Columbus, Ohio, I was told to attend St. John Chrysostom By...
(Quote) MaryAlice-97161 said:



When I first came here, to Columbus, Ohio, I was told to attend St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic Church ... also told that it would satisfy my Sunday obligation for Mass and Communion attendance. It is very lovely, reverent, respectful of The Holy Eucharist, the likes of which I don't ever recall hearing/seeing at a Roman Catholic Latin Mass. But I've returned to my roots to another Roman Rite Catholic Church which has, bit by bit, returned to the Latin. We receive The Holy Eucharist while kneeling at the altar rail, there are no altar girls, and no lay ministers. We have four priests and a cadre of some 90 altar boys.

So, Eric, if you ever find yourself traveling to Columbus, Ohio, look up St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic Church ... you will be very blessed.



--hide--

Most unusual in this day and age. I envy you, Mary Alice.

I have only been in two churches that had more than one priest and they were both in Monasteries. No Church I have visited in recent years has an altar rail.

My own Parish still has the tabernacle where, in my opinion, it belongs; front and center. The Trappist Monastery has it there. The Benedictine monastery has put it off to one of the side altars. My daughter's parish has it hidden away in an adoration chapel, a totally seperate room with a locked door. During Mass one of the Extraordinary Ministers goes to the Adoration chapel to get the Eucharist for distribution, a litergical no-no.

At my daughter's parish I have even seen one of the Extraordinary Ministers tell the Pastor (who is not that old) to whom he should give the cups to for distribution and who should be given the plates with the Consecrated hosts for distribution.

12/05/2012 new

(Quote) Gustavo-764558 said: Some rites cross themselves "backwards". They use leavened Hosts for Holy Eucharist....
(Quote) Gustavo-764558 said:

Some rites cross themselves "backwards". They use leavened Hosts for Holy Eucharist. Priests can be married prior to ordination. Vestment colors are different (blue isn't used in the Roman rite)

In the Byzantine Ruthenian rite on the feast day of John the Baptist, they abstain from eating foods in the shape of a head (apples, cabbage, etc.) nor do they eat anything on a plate.

Hope this helps
--hide--

When imparting the blessing the Clergy of the Eastern rights make the sign of the cross exactly as do clerics of the Latin Rite. The people copy the priest in a mirror image. So when the priests hand is towards the left, the people move their hands to the right. There is also a difference in the positions of the fingers. We use the open hand while the Eastern rights curve some of the fingers. I forget the actual details. and in that particular there is a difference between Eastern Catholics and Orthodox Churches.

12/05/2012 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: The Catholic Church is made up of 22 particular churches that are united in a common faith but differ in ...
(Quote) John-220051 said: The Catholic Church is made up of 22 particular churches that are united in a common faith but differ in liturgical practice based on their cultural heritage.

There are five basic liturgical families.

1)Byzantine (Consisting of the Ruthenians, Melkites, Romanians, Ukrainians, etc.) If it says Catholic in the name it's in union with Rome. Those that are Eastern Orthodox are NOT in union with Rome.

2) Antiochene (Consisting of the Maronites, Syriacs and Syro-Malankaras in India)

3) Armenian

4) Alexandria (Consisting of the Copts and Ethiopians)

5) East Syrian (Consisting of the Chaldeans and Syro-Malabars)

Plus, some of our eparchies have married priests. The Eastern Churches have preserved a lot of customs that have fallen into disuse in the West such as baptism by trine immersion, 6 weeks for Advent instead of 4 weeks, celebrating All Saints Day in the spring and the use of leavened bread in the Eucharist among others.

The following video shows the difference between the Masses of the Byzantine rite and modern Roman rite. www.youtube.com

It shows a Russian Orthodox celebration (Not in union with Rome), which is similar to what Byzantine Catholics do.
--hide--

The rites of the Mass used by both Eastern Catholics and the Orthodox Churches are based on the rite for the Mass developed by St. John Chrysostom back in the Fourth Century.

It is also important to point out that no married priest can be ordained a Bishop, even if they are widowed.

In all the Eastern Churches, both Catholic and Orthodox, there is a more profound development of mysticism. In the west that depth of mysticism is usually found only in monasteries.

12/05/2012 new

(Quote) Ebele-917776 said: Thanks. that was very informative. I had no idea there were rites that allowed married priests. A...
(Quote) Ebele-917776 said:

Thanks. that was very informative. I had no idea there were rites that allowed married priests. Are they married before they start the process of becoming priests? or during?

--hide--

Once ordained, they cannot marry.

Don't forget, we do have married priests in the Latin rite as well. They are married clergy of other faith traditions who have converted to the Catholic Church and have sought special permission to be ordained as Catholic priests, a large portion being former Anglican/Episcopalian priests.

With the new prelature for former anglicans, we will see an increase in married priests. But ordintion to Bishop is still withheld from married piests.

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