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Do you have a favorite homily?

Nov 20th 2012 new

More often than not, the homily speaks to exactly where I am at that time. Do you have a favorite that has impacted your life? Is there one in particular that you draw on continually? Please share those words that have enlightened and inspired you.

My favorite was from Matthew 17:1-9, the Transfiguration. This event on it's own is powerful enough, but Father explained that Jesus gave us four steps for dealing with fear:

1.) Stand up, don't lie there, paralyzed, unable or unwilling to move. Get on your feet.

2.) Surround yourself with a few close friends, people that you trust, who will support you, and walk with them.

3.) Don't tell everyone you meet your troubles. Keep it amongst yourselves as you deal with it and let it become a part of who you are.

4.) When you meet people that are going through the same struggle, share with them what you have learned. Don't let them suffer alone, be empathetic.

I can't tell you how meaningful this homily was to me. Whenever I feel afraid of something, I have this vision of Jesus walking up to his disciples, who "fell on their faces and were greatly afraid" and touching them saying, "Arise, and do not be afraid." With gratitude, I think about the few friends that have helped me through the toughest times. I picture the people who are clueless about what has happened, and I feel for the person I see or hear about facing the same trials.

Nov 20th 2012 new
My Uncle has said many great sermons over the years. One that touched home was when he quoted scripture, Habakkuk 2:2-3. "Then the Lord answered me and said: Write down the dream clearly upon the tablets, so that one can read it readily, For the dream still has its time, presses on to fulfillment, and will not disappoint; If it delays, wait for it, it will surely come, it will not be late." The Bible I am looking at now uses the word vision instead of dream, but my uncle used the word dream. This was one of my favorite of his and all homilies I've ever heard. Thanks Kathy.
Nov 21st 2012 new

(Quote) John-746882 said: My Uncle has said many great sermons over the years. One that touched home was when he quoted scripture, ...
(Quote) John-746882 said: My Uncle has said many great sermons over the years. One that touched home was when he quoted scripture, Habakkuk 2:2-3. "Then the Lord answered me and said: Write down the dream clearly upon the tablets, so that one can read it readily, For the dream still has its time, presses on to fulfillment, and will not disappoint; If it delays, wait for it, it will surely come, it will not be late." The Bible I am looking at now uses the word vision instead of dream, but my uncle used the word dream. This was one of my favorite of his and all homilies I've ever heard. Thanks Kathy.
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Thank you, John. My first thought before marveling at the beauty of this verse, is it's timelessness. I would have loved to hear what your uncle said about this.

Nov 22nd 2012 new

Well, I was hoping this topic would stir up some some good, uplifting messages. This is the time of year I get all warm and fuzzy feeling. So spread the joy CMers! What verse or interpretation raised you up when you least expected it?

Nov 22nd 2012 new
Hello Kathy, As it happens, shortly after, my uncle had given me a copy of his sermon, because I had told him how much I liked the scripture verse. He probably went off script, but below are some excerpts from the homily he wrote. As I said I seem to recall him using the word dream but in his notes he uses vision. No matter. Here it is: Easter 2011 On this warm - although rainy- Easter Sunday it is a good thing to ask what we are doing here? Why are we here? What are we doing here? Now if I were in class and you were my students, I would ask you to take out a pen and paper and write out your answer to that question - and then after 10 minutes or so of feverish writing - during which the students are really "in the zone" - I would ask them to share their answers with one another. And surely in a class as big as this one there would be some wonderful answers- and perhaps as we shared our thoughts with one another, perhaps we would be hanging on every word that came from each one of us. For each of us will tell the story in his or her own way...But because we have a few too many people to do this exercise...I thought I would save us some trouble and let you know how I look at the story of Easter.... Every year at this time we tell this particular story-the story of Our Lord's coming into Jerusalem, his last supper, his Agony in the Garden and his capture, his trial, his terrible suffering and scourging st the pillar, his carrying of the cross and his crucifixion and death - and, finally, his resurrection on Easter Sunday. Today..... The telling of the story is a ritual - it is something we do year after year at this time - because it is important to remember the story - to tell it - to say it - because it is easy to forget it - to lose sight of it. And it is so important for who we are. Families tell stories - and sometimes it's the same stories over and over again - but perhaps with a new twist each time. Why? Because it brings them together - it tells them who they are and where they come from. It sheds light on each person's life - and it clarifies what we can hang onto in the future. And so it is with the story of Holy Week and Easter. And that is why we keep telling the story of Jesus' suffering, death and resurrection - so that we can find ourselves in that story....Today I was struck by the words of the Gospel about Jesus appearing to the two women, Mary Magdalene and "the other Mary" as they come back to from the empty tomb. "They approached, embraced his feet and did him homage." And he said to them, "Do not be afraid; Go tell my brothers to go to Galilee, and there they will see me." The Resurrection happened in Jesus - it happened to Jesus- he was raised from the dead after his terrible suffering. But it happened in the two women as well. They too had suffered terribly - anguish - aloneness - the shattering of their dreams. And they too experienced Jesus resurrection from the dead as they embraced his feet. So that's why we tell the story, that anyone, no matter where they are at in their life, may find himself or herself in the story: Are you suffering? We tell the story to remind us that Jesus is in the depths of our despair. Are we experiencing some Easter joy? Its authenticity will show itself in our love for others. I am reminded of the words from the Old Testament: Then The Lord answered me and said: Write down the vision Clearly upon the tablets, So that one can read it readily. For the vision still has its time, Presses on the fulfillment, and will not disappoint; If it delays, wait for it, It will surely come, it will not be late. (Habakkuk 2,2-3) Let us thank The Lord for giving us this story, "The Greatest Story Ever Told", as the old book put it. But it is not just a story about Jesus - It is also a story about us.
Nov 23rd 2012 new
(Quote) John-746882 said: Hello Kathy, As it happens, shortly after, my uncle had given me a copy of his sermon, because I had told him how m...
(Quote) John-746882 said: Hello Kathy, As it happens, shortly after, my uncle had given me a copy of his sermon, because I had told him how much I liked the scripture verse. He probably went off script, but below are some excerpts from the homily he wrote. As I said I seem to recall him using the word dream but in his notes he uses vision. No matter. Here it is:

Easter 2011

On this warm - although rainy- Easter Sunday it is a good thing to ask what we are doing here? Why are we here? What are we doing here? Now if I were in class and you were my students, I would ask you to take out a pen and paper and write out your answer to that question - and then after 10 minutes or so of feverish writing - during which the students are really "in the zone" - I would ask them to share their answers with one another. And surely in a class as big as this one there would be some wonderful answers- and perhaps as we shared our thoughts with one another, perhaps we would be hanging on every word that came from each one of us.

For each of us will tell the story in his or her own way...But because we have a few too many people to do this exercise...I thought I would save us some trouble and let you know how I look at the story of Easter....

Every year at this time we tell this particular story-the story of Our Lord's coming into Jerusalem, his last supper, his Agony in the Garden and his capture, his trial, his terrible suffering and scourging st the pillar, his carrying of the cross and his crucifixion and death - and, finally, his resurrection on Easter Sunday. Today.....

The telling of the story is a ritual - it is something we do year after year at this time - because it is important to remember the story - to tell it - to say it - because it is easy to forget it - to lose sight of it. And it is so important for who we are.

Families tell stories - and sometimes it's the same stories over and over again - but perhaps with a new twist each time. Why? Because it brings them together - it tells them who they are and where they come from. It sheds light on each person's life - and it clarifies what we can hang onto in the future.

And so it is with the story of Holy Week and Easter. And that is why we keep telling the story of Jesus' suffering, death and resurrection - so that we can find ourselves in that story....Today I was struck by the words of the Gospel about Jesus appearing to the two women, Mary Magdalene and "the other Mary" as they come back to from the empty tomb. "They approached, embraced his feet and did him homage." And he said to them, "Do not be afraid; Go tell my brothers to go to Galilee, and there they will see me."

The Resurrection happened in Jesus - it happened to Jesus- he was raised from the dead after his terrible suffering. But it happened in the two women as well. They too had suffered terribly - anguish - aloneness - the shattering of their dreams. And they too experienced Jesus resurrection from the dead as they embraced his feet.

So that's why we tell the story, that anyone, no matter where they are at in their life, may find himself or herself in the story: Are you suffering? We tell the story to remind us that Jesus is in the depths of our despair. Are we experiencing some Easter joy? Its authenticity will show itself in our love for others.

I am reminded of the words from the Old Testament:

Then The Lord answered me and said:

Write down the vision

Clearly upon the tablets,

So that one can read it readily.

For the vision still has its time,

Presses on the fulfillment, and will not disappoint;

If it delays, wait for it,

It will surely come, it will not be late.

(Habakkuk 2,2-3)

Let us thank The Lord for giving us this story, "The Greatest Story Ever Told", as the old book put it. But it is not just a story about Jesus - It is also a story about us.
--hide--


John, Thank you for sharing!
Nov 23rd 2012 new
(Quote) Kathy-635104 said: More often than not, the homily speaks to exactly where I am at that time. Do you have a favorite that has impa...
(Quote) Kathy-635104 said:

More often than not, the homily speaks to exactly where I am at that time. Do you have a favorite that has impacted your life? Is there one in particular that you draw on continually? Please share those words that have enlightened and inspired you.

My favorite was from Matthew 17:1-9, the Transfiguration. This event on it's own is powerful enough, but Father explained that Jesus gave us four steps for dealing with fear:

1.) Stand up, don't lie there, paralyzed, unable or unwilling to move. Get on your feet.

2.) Surround yourself with a few close friends, people that you trust, who will support you, and walk with them.

3.) Don't tell everyone you meet your troubles. Keep it amongst yourselves as you deal with it and let it become a part of who you are.

4.) When you meet people that are going through the same struggle, share with them what you have learned. Don't let them suffer alone, be empathetic.

I can't tell you how meaningful this homily was to me. Whenever I feel afraid of something, I have this vision of Jesus walking up to his disciples, who "fell on their faces and were greatly afraid" and touching them saying, "Arise, and do not be afraid." With gratitude, I think about the few friends that have helped me through the toughest times. I picture the people who are clueless about what has happened, and I feel for the person I see or hear about facing the same trials.

--hide--


Kathy, Thank you for sharing!
Nov 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) John-746882 said: Hello Kathy, As it happens, shortly after, my uncle had given me a copy of his sermon, because I had told...
(Quote) John-746882 said: Hello Kathy, As it happens, shortly after, my uncle had given me a copy of his sermon, because I had told him how much I liked the scripture verse. He probably went off script, but below are some excerpts from the homily he wrote. As I said I seem to recall him using the word dream but in his notes he uses vision. No matter. Here it is: Easter 2011 On this warm - although rainy- Easter Sunday it is a good thing to ask what we are doing here? Why are we here? What are we doing here? Now if I were in class and you were my students, I would ask you to take out a pen and paper and write out your answer to that question - and then after 10 minutes or so of feverish writing - during which the students are really "in the zone" - I would ask them to share their answers with one another. And surely in a class as big as this one there would be some wonderful answers- and perhaps as we shared our thoughts with one another, perhaps we would be hanging on every word that came from each one of us. For each of us will tell the story in his or her own way...But because we have a few too many people to do this exercise...I thought I would save us some trouble and let you know how I look at the story of Easter.... Every year at this time we tell this particular story-the story of Our Lord's coming into Jerusalem, his last supper, his Agony in the Garden and his capture, his trial, his terrible suffering and scourging st the pillar, his carrying of the cross and his crucifixion and death - and, finally, his resurrection on Easter Sunday. Today..... The telling of the story is a ritual - it is something we do year after year at this time - because it is important to remember the story - to tell it - to say it - because it is easy to forget it - to lose sight of it. And it is so important for who we are. Families tell stories - and sometimes it's the same stories over and over again - but perhaps with a new twist each time. Why? Because it brings them together - it tells them who they are and where they come from. It sheds light on each person's life - and it clarifies what we can hang onto in the future. And so it is with the story of Holy Week and Easter. And that is why we keep telling the story of Jesus' suffering, death and resurrection - so that we can find ourselves in that story....Today I was struck by the words of the Gospel about Jesus appearing to the two women, Mary Magdalene and "the other Mary" as they come back to from the empty tomb. "They approached, embraced his feet and did him homage." And he said to them, "Do not be afraid; Go tell my brothers to go to Galilee, and there they will see me." The Resurrection happened in Jesus - it happened to Jesus- he was raised from the dead after his terrible suffering. But it happened in the two women as well. They too had suffered terribly - anguish - aloneness - the shattering of their dreams. And they too experienced Jesus resurrection from the dead as they embraced his feet. So that's why we tell the story, that anyone, no matter where they are at in their life, may find himself or herself in the story: Are you suffering? We tell the story to remind us that Jesus is in the depths of our despair. Are we experiencing some Easter joy? Its authenticity will show itself in our love for others. I am reminded of the words from the Old Testament: Then The Lord answered me and said: Write down the vision Clearly upon the tablets, So that one can read it readily. For the vision still has its time, Presses on the fulfillment, and will not disappoint; If it delays, wait for it, It will surely come, it will not be late. (Habakkuk 2,2-3) Let us thank The Lord for giving us this story, "The Greatest Story Ever Told", as the old book put it. But it is not just a story about Jesus - It is also a story about us.
--hide--


John, thank you so much! What a perfect day to read this. I hope you had a great day!

Nov 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) Helen-450889 said: Kathy, Thank you for sharing!
(Quote) Helen-450889 said:

Kathy, Thank you for sharing!
--hide--


You're very welcome, Helen. Do you have a favorite you can share?

Nov 23rd 2012 new

So far, I like St. John Chrysostom's 26th Homily on First Corinthians.

The text of it is available at this link:

newadvent.org



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