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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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As I walk around the streets, or go into stores, or take mass transit, I hear so much
Spanish around me.

What is wrong with having English spoken in our great nation? After all, that is the
national language.

If one goes to Europe, each country has its own national language. They are proud of
that language and their own culture.

Why should we have our national language and our American culture taken from us?

Sure, things change and that is a natural progression, but when it happens in less than 30 years,
that is more like a forced progression. And now we have a divided America. What is wrong with
a divided America?

A lot is wrong with a divided America.

Nov 24th 2012 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: As I walk around the streets, or go into stores, or take mass transit, I hear so muchSpani...
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:

As I walk around the streets, or go into stores, or take mass transit, I hear so much
Spanish around me.

What is wrong with having English spoken in our great nation? After all, that is the
national language.

If one goes to Europe, each country has its own national language. They are proud of
that language and their own culture.

Why should we have our national language and our American culture taken from us?

Sure, things change and that is a natural progression, but when it happens in less than 30 years,
that is more like a forced progression. And now we have a divided America. What is wrong with
a divided America?

A lot is wrong with a divided America.

--hide--

English may be the most frequently spoken language. In reality, we don't have an official language. Every time a law has been proposed in Congress to designate English as the official language it has been defeated as un-American. But all the inane laws requiring official documents to be available in an assortment of languages pass with flying colors.

I would also point out that as each wave of immigrants arrived in this country, the older inhabitants complained about the language, culture or practices the newcomers arrived with.

What appears to be very different now is that unlike those previous immigrants, the current crop, both legals and illegals, don't seem to think assimilation for themselves and especially for their children is important. The intellectual elites seem to think we should not just celebrate what immigrants bring but must cater to them. Before WWII, virtually every school had night classes for adult immigrants to learn English and civics so they could become citizens and acquire some skills that would help them find jobs. Now days, they don't even successfully do that for the any kids, immigrants or native born.

Among many Mexican immigrants, there appears to be an undercurrent of, "this country was stolen from us and we want it back."

Nov 24th 2012 new

My parents were legal immigrants after WWII. While they retained much of their Lithuanian culture, they still learned the English language. And no region of this country made bi-lingual signs so that they could understand in their first language. None of their neighbors were encouraged to learn Lithuanian so as to make them feel more comfortable or what-have-you.

At our parish staff meetings, we recently started to pray a decade of the rosary at the beginning--half in English and half in Spanish. There's not a single staff member who doesn't understand English; but a handful of us cannot, or do not, pray the Hail Mary in Spanish. And I have attended English Masses where some of the hymns were parly in Spanish. It's bothered me, this unnecessary "catering" to a portion of the population which, in my experience, have in small percentage bothered to learn English at all.

If I move to China, I doubt they'll make provisions to accommodate my native language. And it would be silly, arrogant, and stupid of me to expect them to.

Nov 24th 2012 new

(Quote) Lina-796057 said: My parents were legal immigrants after WWII. While they retained much of their Lithuanian culture,...
(Quote) Lina-796057 said:

My parents were legal immigrants after WWII. While they retained much of their Lithuanian culture, they still learned the English language. And no region of this country made bi-lingual signs so that they could understand in their first language. None of their neighbors were encouraged to learn Lithuanian so as to make them feel more comfortable or what-have-you.

At our parish staff meetings, we recently started to pray a decade of the rosary at the beginning--half in English and half in Spanish. There's not a single staff member who doesn't understand English; but a handful of us cannot, or do not, pray the Hail Mary in Spanish. And I have attended English Masses where some of the hymns were parly in Spanish. It's bothered me, this unnecessary "catering" to a portion of the population which, in my experience, have in small percentage bothered to learn English at all.

If I move to China, I doubt they'll make provisions to accommodate my native language. And it would be silly, arrogant, and stupid of me to expect them to.

--hide--


When I hire people who speak Spanish, and suggest that they speak English to me, they tell me to speak Spanish to
them. Go figure.

Nov 24th 2012 new

(Quote) Paul-866591 said: English may be the most frequently spoken language. In reality, we don't have an offi...
(Quote) Paul-866591 said:

English may be the most frequently spoken language. In reality, we don't have an official language. Every time a law has been proposed in Congress to designate English as the official language it has been defeated as un-American. But all the inane laws requiring official documents to be available in an assortment of languages pass with flying colors.

I would also point out that as each wave of immigrants arrived in this country, the older inhabitants complained about the language, culture or practices the newcomers arrived with.

What appears to be very different now is that unlike those previous immigrants, the current crop, both legals and illegals, don't seem to think assimilation for themselves and especially for their children is important. The intellectual elites seem to think we should not just celebrate what immigrants bring but must cater to them. Before WWII, virtually every school had night classes for adult immigrants to learn English and civics so they could become citizens and acquire some skills that would help them find jobs. Now days, they don't even successfully do that for the any kids, immigrants or native born.

Among many Mexican immigrants, there appears to be an undercurrent of, "this country was stolen from us and we want it back."

--hide--


I imagine that English would be used in basic training for the US Military. Unless everyone is on the same page, efficiency
would be diminished.

Nov 24th 2012 new

And I feel "bad" when I object to this different standard, as though I will be perceived as anti-Mexican or as generally prejudiced, which I am not.

Nov 24th 2012 new

(Quote) Lina-796057 said: And I feel "bad" when I object to this different standard, as though I will be perceived...
(Quote) Lina-796057 said:

And I feel "bad" when I object to this different standard, as though I will be perceived as anti-Mexican or as generally prejudiced, which I am not.

--hide--


I like English spoken around me because it feels more like my homeland, America. When I travel, I don't
understand the native language for the most part, but that makes it more special to arrive home.

Nov 25th 2012 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: As I walk around the streets, or go into stores, or take mass transit, I hear so muchSpani...
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:

As I walk around the streets, or go into stores, or take mass transit, I hear so much
Spanish around me.

What is wrong with having English spoken in our great nation? After all, that is the
national language.

If one goes to Europe, each country has its own national language. They are proud of
that language and their own culture.

Why should we have our national language and our American culture taken from us?

Sure, things change and that is a natural progression, but when it happens in less than 30 years,
that is more like a forced progression. And now we have a divided America. What is wrong with
a divided America?

A lot is wrong with a divided America.

--hide--


As far as Europe goes, nationalism based on language is quite new. Even now in European countries such as Spain and France, the Basque language, Euskara and the Corsican language (also spoken in Italy), Corsu are still spoken widely. While they aren't majority languages, to my knowledge they are still taught in school in the regions where they're common.

After coming in from Ellis Island in 1917, my Lithuanian great-grandfather moved to "little Lithuania" in Chicago. There, it is common to hear the language, even now. There even used to be a Lithuanian language newspaper there, too.

I don't have a problem hearing people speak Spanish or Hindi or Urdu or Portuguese or any number of other languages. These things come and go. I understand speaking in English being a pre-requisite of business with the public at large, but could care less if people spoke their mother-tongue on the bus, sidewalk, shopping mall, etc. in a private capacity.

It's not language that divides us in the USA, it's religion and rationality. I, for one, do not ascribe to the post-protestant mainstream americanism...and that divides me from a lot of people whether I speak English or not.

Nov 25th 2012 new

(Quote) Chelsea-743484 said: As far as Europe goes, nationalism based on language is quite new. Even now in European countri...
(Quote) Chelsea-743484 said:

As far as Europe goes, nationalism based on language is quite new. Even now in European countries such as Spain and France, the Basque language, Euskara and the Corsican language (also spoken in Italy), Corsu are still spoken widely. While they aren't majority languages, to my knowledge they are still taught in school in the regions where they're common.

After coming in from Ellis Island in 1917, my Lithuanian great-grandfather moved to "little Lithuania" in Chicago. There, it is common to hear the language, even now. There even used to be a Lithuanian language newspaper there, too.

I don't have a problem hearing people speak Spanish or Hindi or Urdu or Portuguese or any number of other languages. These things come and go. I understand speaking in English being a pre-requisite of business with the public at large, but could care less if people spoke their mother-tongue on the bus, sidewalk, shopping mall, etc. in a private capacity.

It's not language that divides us in the USA, it's religion and rationality. I, for one, do not ascribe to the post-protestant mainstream americanism...and that divides me from a lot of people whether I speak English or not.

--hide--
Chelsea, I agree with what I bolded in your quote above. I, too, don't have a problem with people speaking their native tongues if it differs from English. I think it's wonderful to retain a portion of your cultural heritage, no matter where you are. What I do find objectionable is how America has chosen to cater to one particular ethnicity on such a grand scale. I don't recall whether it was 10 or more years ago, but I was shocked to walk in to Home Depot one day and find signs in both English and Spanish. And why should ballots or other government forms be printed in both languages now, when it was never done for other languaged peoples? Why is the preference for the Latino culture now--is it just a numbers game, as the Latino population is so large here now?

I sort of answered my own question, as I thought about other countries. In certain tourist hot spots, one would find signs in several foreign languages. This, I'm sure, is done to "help" foreigners visiting, but I think it boils down to making more money by "catering" in such a way.

Nov 25th 2012 new

(Quote) Lina-796057 said: Chelsea, I agree with what I bolded in your quote above. I, too, don't have a problem with peo...
(Quote) Lina-796057 said:

Chelsea, I agree with what I bolded in your quote above. I, too, don't have a problem with people speaking their native tongues if it differs from English. I think it's wonderful to retain a portion of your cultural heritage, no matter where you are. What I do find objectionable is how America has chosen to cater to one particular ethnicity on such a grand scale. I don't recall whether it was 10 or more years ago, but I was shocked to walk in to Home Depot one day and find signs in both English and Spanish. And why should ballots or other government forms be printed in both languages now, when it was never done for other languaged peoples? Why is the preference for the Latino culture now--is it just a numbers game, as the Latino population is so large here now?

I sort of answered my own question, as I thought about other countries. In certain tourist hot spots, one would find signs in several foreign languages. This, I'm sure, is done to "help" foreigners visiting, but I think it boils down to making more money by "catering" in such a way.

--hide--


I think the answer boils down to the little tid-bit of wisdom Big Dan Teague gave to Everett in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? :

It's all about the money, boys!

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