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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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Dec 28th 2012 new

WHy not take a look at some of the folks that work here at CM? They are computer people and very Catholic.

Dec 28th 2012 new

(Quote) Marian-83994 said: being a gamer is rather narrow- isn't it? Correect me because I know almost nothing a...
(Quote) Marian-83994 said:



being a gamer is rather narrow- isn't it? Correect me because I know almost nothing about it but it does seem a bit unattractive of a focus for a prospective husband. I know a young lady whose husband divorced her due to gaming addiction. He found another gamer and married her or is living with her.. THAT's NOT REALLY LIVING IMHO... is it? I mean, come on...

--hide--



There is nothing wrong with gaming. I have a geeky younger sister and her geeky younger BILwho love to play fun games. Obviously they are more into other things than just that, but they enjoy that for pasttime. Craig, don't loose hope and be yourself because you will someday whether you like your games or not find the perfect woman for you biggrin There is nothing wrong with enjoying the GAME cool I thought it was cute when I visit them and they are all about their wii games, hehe. They are perfect and have an excellent loving relationship along with the management jobs they both hold biggrin

Dec 28th 2012 new

(Quote) Craig-883532 said: I'm a bit of a curious one. Computer programmer, geek of all trades, but also someone who enj...
(Quote) Craig-883532 said:

I'm a bit of a curious one. Computer programmer, geek of all trades, but also someone who enjoys camping, kayaking, sailing, swimming and biking. Not so much expecting an answer as much as positing a quandry to the world. There are two dating sites I frequent: Catholic Match is one, and Geek2Geek is the other. Personally, I prefer the style and layout, and inhabitants of CM. When I search through people in my area, I see plenty of kind individuals listed, but unfortunately no one seems to identify as a gamer beyond enjoying the occaisional movie. On the other hand, when I go to gk2gk, I see plenty of matches for women who are into Harry Potter, Doctor Who, video gaming and the like, but not one, not one who is Catholic.

This raises an interesting (if false) dichotomy. The appearance is that being geeky and being Catholic are mutually exclusive, but I don't buy that. Am I putting too much weight into common interest? I was always taught (and I firmly believe) that there can be no love without friendship, and friendships are formed on the basis of common (or at least compatible) interest. Religion is something I can't compromise on in a relationship (I tried once and it didn't end well, even though the Church would have allowed the wedding), but on the same note, I feel someone who isn't a geek is going to be put off by my hobbies, since roleplaying, gaming etc carries such a social stigma to it.


Am I crazy, or am I making this harder than it has to be?



--hide--

Craig, and maybe Greg as well - just tossing in my $.02 here as an older fella who built and programmed an Altair 8800 shortly after earning a Chemistry degree. I do not know if you're crazy, but yes, you ARE making this harder than it needs to be. I'd suggest not leading with the 'geek' label, or for that matter, ANY label - every label carries with it positive and negative associations, and labels are inherently limiting, to the person who wears the label AND the person who reads it. Your self-labeling ends up not only limiting you but to a great extent creating who you are; we self-label when we WANT to be what the label describes.

Just out of school, and working in a geeky field - I designed, built and programmed custom-designed automated analytical systems - I took inordinate pride in my 'smarts', labeled myself as a 'nerd' (this was the mid-70s) and in so doing succeeded in isolating myself from people who were every bit as intelligent and capable as I was, but worked in different fields. After a few years I figured out that my work need not be my identity - and it's clear from your profile, once one gets past your self-identification, that there is a great deal more to you than digital intelligence.

People are seldom if ever just one thing: you're a very bright young guy who does athletic, outdoorsy things, is serious about his faith (bravo!), is articulate, writes a fair stick (NOT common for 'geeks') and works in a technical field. That description of you is SO much more interesting than 'geek'. I respectfully suggest that the social stigma assoicated with gaming, role-playing and the like stems from the implication that grown men and women spending time in these activities - identifying these as significant in their lives - are somewhat less than mature and probably not great marriage / family material. Every stereotype has its origin in observable truth...and this would apply to yourself and the partner you seek. Lisa is, IMO, absolutely right on with the scripture she paraphrases.

Perhaps this is a good time to consider a review of your priorities. If marriage in the faith and starting a family have become more important than being a 'geek', and all that label implies, then you might consider doing something risky and and out of character: depart from your comfort zone, i.e., the company of other 'geeks', and develop your other interests by seeking the company of people who do those things. Your boundaries will expand, you'll develop new interests from meeting people you would otherwise no have met, and thereby increase the probability of finding friendship based on common (new for you? maybe!) interests. Take off the 'geek' armor, Craig, and find out who God made you to be.

Dec 28th 2012 new

(Quote) Cathy-564420 said: (Quote) Marian-83994 said: being a gamer is rather narrow- isn'...
(Quote) Cathy-564420 said:

Quote:
Marian-83994 said:



being a gamer is rather narrow- isn't it? Correect me because I know almost nothing about it but it does seem a bit unattractive of a focus for a prospective husband. I know a young lady whose husband divorced her due to gaming addiction. He found another gamer and married her or is living with her.. THAT's NOT REALLY LIVING IMHO... is it? I mean, come on...





There is nothing wrong with gaming. I have a geeky younger sister and her geeky younger BILwho love to play fun games. Obviously they are more into other things than just that, but they enjoy that for pasttime. Craig, don't loose hope and be yourself because you will someday whether you like your games or not find the perfect woman for you There is nothing wrong with enjoying the GAME I thought it was cute when I visit them and they are all about their wii games, hehe. They are perfect and have an excellent loving relationship along with the management jobs they both hold

--hide--


Thanks for sharing. I do not know enough about what it is and I know that these things are fun. I was sharing that I know a woman who lost her husband and marriage to it but he found another gamer. I am not sure if gaming refers to the same thing in every case?Aren't there many types of gaming and does it mean several things? Is it all the same? I would think not.

Dec 28th 2012 new

Shh...you're not supposed to admit that you have a d20 collection or that you have the Amtgard rulebook!

Dec 28th 2012 new

(Quote) Steven-924301 said: (Quote) Craig-883532 said: I'm a bit of a curious one. Computer progr...
(Quote) Steven-924301 said:

Quote:
Craig-883532 said:

I'm a bit of a curious one. Computer programmer, geek of all trades, but also someone who enjoys camping, kayaking, sailing, swimming and biking. Not so much expecting an answer as much as positing a quandry to the world. There are two dating sites I frequent: Catholic Match is one, and Geek2Geek is the other. Personally, I prefer the style and layout, and inhabitants of CM. When I search through people in my area, I see plenty of kind individuals listed, but unfortunately no one seems to identify as a gamer beyond enjoying the occaisional movie. On the other hand, when I go to gk2gk, I see plenty of matches for women who are into Harry Potter, Doctor Who, video gaming and the like, but not one, not one who is Catholic.

This raises an interesting (if false) dichotomy. The appearance is that being geeky and being Catholic are mutually exclusive, but I don't buy that. Am I putting too much weight into common interest? I was always taught (and I firmly believe) that there can be no love without friendship, and friendships are formed on the basis of common (or at least compatible) interest. Religion is something I can't compromise on in a relationship (I tried once and it didn't end well, even though the Church would have allowed the wedding), but on the same note, I feel someone who isn't a geek is going to be put off by my hobbies, since roleplaying, gaming etc carries such a social stigma to it.


Am I crazy, or am I making this harder than it has to be?




Craig, and maybe Greg as well - just tossing in my $.02 here as an older fella who built and programmed an Altair 8800 shortly after earning a Chemistry degree. I do not know if you're crazy, but yes, you ARE making this harder than it needs to be. I'd suggest not leading with the 'geek' label, or for that matter, ANY label - every label carries with it positive and negative associations, and labels are inherently limiting, to the person who wears the label AND the person who reads it. Your self-labeling ends up not only limiting you but to a great extent creating who you are; we self-label when we WANT to be what the label describes.

Just out of school, and working in a geeky field - I designed, built and programmed custom-designed automated analytical systems - I took inordinate pride in my 'smarts', labeled myself as a 'nerd' (this was the mid-70s) and in so doing succeeded in isolating myself from people who were every bit as intelligent and capable as I was, but worked in different fields. After a few years I figured out that my work need not be my identity - and it's clear from your profile, once one gets past your self-identification, that there is a great deal more to you than digital intelligence.

People are seldom if ever just one thing: you're a very bright young guy who does athletic, outdoorsy things, is serious about his faith (bravo!), is articulate, writes a fair stick (NOT common for 'geeks') and works in a technical field. That description of you is SO much more interesting than 'geek'. I respectfully suggest that the social stigma assoicated with gaming, role-playing and the like stems from the implication that grown men and women spending time in these activities - identifying these as significant in their lives - are somewhat less than mature and probably not great marriage / family material. Every stereotype has its origin in observable truth...and this would apply to yourself and the partner you seek. Lisa is, IMO, absolutely right on with the scripture she paraphrases.

Perhaps this is a good time to consider a review of your priorities. If marriage in the faith and starting a family have become more important than being a 'geek', and all that label implies, then you might consider doing something risky and and out of character: depart from your comfort zone, i.e., the company of other 'geeks', and develop your other interests by seeking the company of people who do those things. Your boundaries will expand, you'll develop new interests from meeting people you would otherwise no have met, and thereby increase the probability of finding friendship based on common (new for you? maybe!) interests. Take off the 'geek' armor, Craig, and find out who God made you to be.

--hide--


THIS is such excellent advice. I found that as talented as I am in music, many musicians did nto have much to talk about and somehow limiting myself to that just after college was too quick of a limitation on me. I am an example of someone who is enjoying the richness of many fields and I am not just one thing. LOVE YOUR post!

Dec 28th 2012 new

I will say, too, that someone who is completely unwilling to sacrifice a complete devotion to a pastime or hobby (no matter what it is) when it is time to support a family is very scary. Whether it's gaming, dirt bikes, gourmet cooking, or base jumping doesn't matter at that point. "Geek" or "gamer" does tend to conjure someone who is fairly obsessed with the pastime, possibly to the exclusion of other pursuits.

Gold farming for WoW is not exactly a job...or the Trekkie who went to jury duty in the Starfleet uniform...not attractive. Going to ComicCon or playing D&D on Saturday nights? Cool.

Dec 28th 2012 new

(Quote) Craig-883532 said: I'm a bit of a curious one. Computer programmer, geek of all trades, but also someone who enj...
(Quote) Craig-883532 said:

I'm a bit of a curious one. Computer programmer, geek of all trades, but also someone who enjoys camping, kayaking, sailing, swimming and biking. Not so much expecting an answer as much as positing a quandry to the world. There are two dating sites I frequent: Catholic Match is one, and Geek2Geek is the other. Personally, I prefer the style and layout, and inhabitants of CM. When I search through people in my area, I see plenty of kind individuals listed, but unfortunately no one seems to identify as a gamer beyond enjoying the occaisional movie. On the other hand, when I go to gk2gk, I see plenty of matches for women who are into Harry Potter, Doctor Who, video gaming and the like, but not one, not one who is Catholic.

This raises an interesting (if false) dichotomy. The appearance is that being geeky and being Catholic are mutually exclusive, but I don't buy that. Am I putting too much weight into common interest? I was always taught (and I firmly believe) that there can be no love without friendship, and friendships are formed on the basis of common (or at least compatible) interest. Religion is something I can't compromise on in a relationship (I tried once and it didn't end well, even though the Church would have allowed the wedding), but on the same note, I feel someone who isn't a geek is going to be put off by my hobbies, since roleplaying, gaming etc carries such a social stigma to it.


Am I crazy, or am I making this harder than it has to be?



--hide--


Craig - I dated a woman who did have issue with my education background and career accomplishments. She later explained that her insecurities were an issue. The relationship ended for several reasons...guess she jsut wasn't the one..... :(

Dec 28th 2012 new

It's unfortunate that the term "gamer" has a negative connotation because not all people who play video games are addicted to them or have problems managing their enjoyment of them with their life's obligations. Plus, who can't appreciate a man who has invested his free time preparing for a zombie apolcalypse? Playing games also does not mean that the gamer wants to live in some sort of fantasy land that a game could provide--really, who would want to live in a world full of zombies, or worse yet in a town whose only merchant is an extortionist raccoon?

Dec 28th 2012 new

I have to share about my geeky son and his company IFTTT!!


They were just featured in the CatholicMom daily e letter!!


Using IFTTT.com for Ministry

Posted: 28 Dec 2012 04:00 AM PST

I’m a geek. Perhaps not a mega-geek, but a geek none the less. I LOVE geeky stuff, from Star Wars, to LoTR, to anything Apple/Mac related. LOVE IT! One of the COOLEST geeky things I’ve found recently is IFTTT.com.

I.f T.his T.hen T.hat .com is an incredible web-service that connects all of your most used web services, like Facebook, Dropbox, Evernote, Twitter, Instagram, and MORE! The idea behind it is automating a string of tasks to make your life simpler. Here are just a few examples of what you can do with IFTTT.com:

* Have your phone text you the weather every day.

* Have your phone CALL YOU, when you send a particular text message – sneaky way to get out of a meeting

* Have any pictures you take on Instagram automatically backed up to your Dropbox account

* Have your Facebook status PUSHED to Twitter (instead of the other way around)

* Plus so so so much more!

How can IFTTT.com help in terms of ministry? My inspiration came from reading an article about a youth ministry group that had created an Instagram account to share youth group photos with students and parents. I thought to myself, “Hmmmm, how could I make this more interactive?”

Here’s what I did:

I created an IFTTT.com recipe (ifttt.com that looks for ANY public Instagram photo with a designated hashtag (for me, I chose “#stmyouth” for St. Thomas More Youth Ministry) Once ifttt.com finds this hash tag, it DOWNLOADS the photo to my dropbox account!

Couple that with this recipe (ifttt.com which takes any pictures YOU take and archives it to Dropbox and you have a great opportunity to collect photos from any given trip because they’ll all be in your Dropbox waiting for you when you get back from the trip.

For some added interactivity use this recipe (ifttt.com and ifttt.comwill automatically post your instagram pictures to your group’s Facebook Fan Page.

Read more of our Tech Talk columns.

Copyright 2012 Tom Lelyo

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