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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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12 days of Christmas?

Dec 29th 2012 new
Hello all CMers, Who knows the history behind the '12 days if Christmas'? Is it a time to give that special someone gifts for 12 days? If a women ( today) received gifts from her true love for 12 days straight, What would she think? Would a man ( now) actually even do this? Just interested! Jake
Dec 29th 2012 new

Hi Jacob! I hope the link comes through in this thread. It's an interesting history of the Twelve Days of Christmas. Actually, I never really thought about it. Every year in southern California, one of the news stations will add up the cost of the gifts - like anything else, it continues to rise. Happy New Year! Chelle

www.byrum.org

Dec 29th 2012 new

(Quote) Jacob-203775 said: Hello all CMers, Who knows the history behind the '12 days if Christmas'? Is it a time to give t...
(Quote) Jacob-203775 said: Hello all CMers, Who knows the history behind the '12 days if Christmas'? Is it a time to give that special someone gifts for 12 days? If a women ( today) received gifts from her true love for 12 days straight, What would she think? Would a man ( now) actually even do this? Just interested! Jake
--hide--

In 1982, Fr. Stockert put this online in 1982. Since then there has been controversy on whether or not the story of the origin is correct. Much of the story makes sense, because there are other "Catechism songs" that have similar hidden meanings, such as "Green Grow the Rushes". Could some people be disputing the origin because they refuse to acknowledge the persecution of Catholic in England during 1558 to 1829? Perhaps the objection is just to the fact that there is no paper trail to this explanation. Regardless if the origin is accurate or not, as Catholics we can use this song as a catechism, to apply religious meanings to a secular song.

DIRECTIONS

You're all familiar with the Christmas song, "The Twelve Days of Christmas" I think. To most it's a delightful nonsense rhyme set to music. But it had a quite serious purpose when it was written.

It is a good deal more than just a repetitious melody with pretty phrases and a list of strange gifts.

Catholics in England during the period 1558 to 1829, when Parliament finally emancipated Catholics in England, were prohibited from ANY practice of their faith by law — private OR public. It was a crime to BE a Catholic.

"The Twelve Days of Christmas" was written in England as one of the "catechism songs" to help young Catholics learn the tenets of their faith - a memory aid, when to be caught with anything in *writing* indicating adherence to the Catholic faith could not only get you imprisoned, it could get you hanged, or shortened by a head — or hanged, drawn and quartered, a rather peculiar and ghastly punishment I'm not aware was ever practiced anywhere else. Hanging, drawing and quartering involved hanging a person by the neck until they had almost, but not quite, suffocated to death; then the party was taken down from the gallows, and disembowelled while still alive; and while the entrails were still lying on the street, where the executioners stomped all over them, the victim was tied to four large farm horses, and literally torn into five parts - one to each limb and the remaining torso.

The songs gifts are hidden meanings to the teachings of the faith. The "true love" mentioned in the song doesn't refer to an earthly suitor, it refers to God Himself. The "me" who receives the presents refers to every baptized person. The partridge in a pear tree is Jesus Christ, the Son of God. In the song, Christ is symbolically presented as a mother partridge which feigns injury to decoy predators from her helpless nestlings, much in memory of the expression of Christ's sadness over the fate of Jerusalem: "Jerusalem! Jerusalem! How often would I have sheltered thee under my wings, as a hen does her chicks, but thou wouldst not have it so..."

The other symbols mean the following:

Two (2) Turtle Doves = The Old and New Testaments

Three (3) French Hens = Faith, Hope and Charity, the Theological Virtues

Four (4) Calling Birds = the Four Gospels and/or the Four Evangelists

Five (5) Golden Rings = The first Five Books of the Old Testament, the "Pentateuch", which gives the history of man's fall from grace.

Six (6) Geese A-laying = the six days of creation

Seven (7) Swans A-swimming = the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, the seven sacraments

Eight (8) Maids A-milking = the eight beatitudes

Nine (9) Ladies Dancing = the nine Fruits of the Holy Spirit

Ten (10) Lords A-leaping = the ten commandments

Eleven (11) Pipers Piping = the eleven faithful apostles

Twelve (12) Drummers Drumming = the twelve points of doctrine in the Apostle's Creed

by Fr. Hal Stockert, 12/17/95

Dec 29th 2012 new

(Quote) Donna-521814 said: In 1982, Fr. Stockert put this online in 1982. Since then there has been controversy on whether o...
(Quote) Donna-521814 said:

In 1982, Fr. Stockert put this online in 1982. Since then there has been controversy on whether or not the story of the origin is correct. Much of the story makes sense, because there are other "Catechism songs" that have similar hidden meanings, such as "Green Grow the Rushes". Could some people be disputing the origin because they refuse to acknowledge the persecution of Catholic in England during 1558 to 1829? Perhaps the objection is just to the fact that there is no paper trail to this explanation. Regardless if the origin is accurate or not, as Catholics we can use this song as a catechism, to apply religious meanings to a secular song.

DIRECTIONS

You're all familiar with the Christmas song, "The Twelve Days of Christmas" I think. To most it's a delightful nonsense rhyme set to music. But it had a quite serious purpose when it was written.

It is a good deal more than just a repetitious melody with pretty phrases and a list of strange gifts.

Catholics in England during the period 1558 to 1829, when Parliament finally emancipated Catholics in England, were prohibited from ANY practice of their faith by law — private OR public. It was a crime to BE a Catholic.

"The Twelve Days of Christmas" was written in England as one of the "catechism songs" to help young Catholics learn the tenets of their faith - a memory aid, when to be caught with anything in *writing* indicating adherence to the Catholic faith could not only get you imprisoned, it could get you hanged, or shortened by a head — or hanged, drawn and quartered, a rather peculiar and ghastly punishment I'm not aware was ever practiced anywhere else. Hanging, drawing and quartering involved hanging a person by the neck until they had almost, but not quite, suffocated to death; then the party was taken down from the gallows, and disembowelled while still alive; and while the entrails were still lying on the street, where the executioners stomped all over them, the victim was tied to four large farm horses, and literally torn into five parts - one to each limb and the remaining torso.

The songs gifts are hidden meanings to the teachings of the faith. The "true love" mentioned in the song doesn't refer to an earthly suitor, it refers to God Himself. The "me" who receives the presents refers to every baptized person. The partridge in a pear tree is Jesus Christ, the Son of God. In the song, Christ is symbolically presented as a mother partridge which feigns injury to decoy predators from her helpless nestlings, much in memory of the expression of Christ's sadness over the fate of Jerusalem: "Jerusalem! Jerusalem! How often would I have sheltered thee under my wings, as a hen does her chicks, but thou wouldst not have it so..."

The other symbols mean the following:

Two (2) Turtle Doves = The Old and New Testaments

Three (3) French Hens = Faith, Hope and Charity, the Theological Virtues

Four (4) Calling Birds = the Four Gospels and/or the Four Evangelists

Five (5) Golden Rings = The first Five Books of the Old Testament, the "Pentateuch", which gives the history of man's fall from grace.

Six (6) Geese A-laying = the six days of creation

Seven (7) Swans A-swimming = the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit, the seven sacraments

Eight (8) Maids A-milking = the eight beatitudes

Nine (9) Ladies Dancing = the nine Fruits of the Holy Spirit

Ten (10) Lords A-leaping = the ten commandments

Eleven (11) Pipers Piping = the eleven faithful apostles

Twelve (12) Drummers Drumming = the twelve points of doctrine in the Apostle's Creed

by Fr. Hal Stockert, 12/17/95

--hide--

FWIW - here's what Snopes has to say about this claim: www.snopes.com

The most pursuasive objection is the most obvious: The important thing is to know what the (e.g.) 8 Beatitudes are, not only that there are 8 of them. The song provides no clue to the details.

Dec 29th 2012 new
Thanks for the responses, very interesting! Are there 12 days between Christmas and the epiphany? The Three kings followed a Star to The Holy Family to give these gifts to Jesus Christ and His family. Is this time the 12 days of Christmas? Does the Church treat these days between Christmas and the Epiphany as feast days? Days of rejoicing? Like the eight days of Easter ( Easter October)? Was the Star visible during all of this time? Can the Star still be seen ? Thoughts? Jake
Dec 29th 2012 new

Correction: Easter october should read Easter Octave.

Dec 29th 2012 new
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said: Hi Jacob! I hope the link comes through in this thread. It's an interesting history of the Twelve Da...
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said:

Hi Jacob! I hope the link comes through in this thread. It's an interesting history of the Twelve Days of Christmas. Actually, I never really thought about it. Every year in southern California, one of the news stations will add up the cost of the gifts - like anything else, it continues to rise. Happy New Year! Chelle

www.byrum.org

--hide--


Thanks Chelle, I knew this was behind the song, but didn't remember all of them rosary Clair
Dec 29th 2012 new
Mary had a little Lamb... Who's fleese was as white as snow.
Dec 29th 2012 new
(Quote) Jerry-74383 said: FWIW - here's what Snopes has to say about this claim: www.snopes.com.
(Quote) Jerry-74383 said:



FWIW - here's what Snopes has to say about this claim: www.snopes.com



The most pursuasive objection is the most obvious: The important thing is to know what the (e.g.) 8 Beatitudes are, not only that there are 8 of them. The song provides no clue to the details.



--hide--


How do we know Snoopes has any clue? It's a Google site.
Dec 29th 2012 new
If ' True love' refers to God in the song, 12 days of Christmas, And He gives us all ( the 'me') these gifts, are we not then supposed to be greatful and thank Him? Are we ( the 'me') then obliged to accept these gifts, use them Properly as our ' True Love' ( God ) would wish ( or Will) for us? In many ways, God should be our first and True Love, for if we don't love God, (who is Love,) how is it possible to Love someone else ( when we leave God= Love, out of the equation) Thoughts?
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