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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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One of the poll questions gave me the idea for this topic.


When I was in grade school, the practice of giving something additional up for Lent was always stressed. (I always practice not eating meat on Fridays during Lent. What I am talking about is giving up something in addition to the "no meat" practice.) I understand the meaning for giving up something you like for Lent, like chocolate or goodies as a reminder of Christ's sacrifice and love for us.


When I got to college, though, after a couple of years of giving up sweets for Lent, I began to reflect on the "giving up" practice and realized that you can practice Jesus's teachings during Lent by DOING something more, like a novena (which I plan to do) or volunteering to help at a humanitarian organization.


Now, I'm not judging here, because obviously good changes may occur through "giving up" something for Lent as well. I'm wondering what you prefer and how you practice your faith during Lent? Do you give something else up in addition to meat OR do you do something else instead?

Feb 2nd 2013 new

I give something up. Last year it was TV (except for EWTN), the year before was eating out. This year will be eating out/take out again. By the time Lent rolls around each year, I can really use a break from my indulgences. Giving up all restaurant and fast food is really good for the wallet too, and some of the money saved can be given to charity. Giving up TV last year was supposed to free me up for things like spiritual reading, but that didn't work too well because I just ended up spending the time on the internet instead. embarassed

Feb 2nd 2013 new

Before a penitential season like Advent or Lent rolls around I like to pray and ask the Lord to guide me in how to approach it. Is there maybe a certain theme that he wants me to take to prayer? How about a particular aspect of his suffering, or a particular Scripture verse that will remain with me throughout the Season? Preparing for it in this way helps to guide me in what I think He may be guiding me to do (which could entail spending more time in prayer, doing some service, or whatever) or to pray about. God bless your Lenten journey everyone! And remember, it's the year of Faith. Let us ask ourselves: Do we truly believe in what the Lord reveals? Do we truly believe in his love for us? After all, it's why he died for us. May it be a fruitful time for all!

Feb 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Alena-887599 said: One of the poll questions gave me the idea for this topic.When I was in grade school,...
(Quote) Alena-887599 said:

One of the poll questions gave me the idea for this topic.


When I was in grade school, the practice of giving something additional up for Lent was always stressed. (I always practice not eating meat on Fridays during Lent. What I am talking about is giving up something in addition to the "no meat" practice.) I understand the meaning for giving up something you like for Lent, like chocolate or goodies as a reminder of Christ's sacrifice and love for us.


When I got to college, though, after a couple of years of giving up sweets for Lent, I began to reflect on the "giving up" practice and realized that you can practice Jesus's teachings during Lent by DOING something more, like a novena (which I plan to do) or volunteering to help at a humanitarian organization.


Now, I'm not judging here, because obviously good changes may occur through "giving up" something for Lent as well. I'm wondering what you prefer and how you practice your faith during Lent? Do you give something else up in addition to meat OR do you do something else instead?

--hide--
A person may do one or the other, or both. You're right about the days of yesteryear when the emphasis was on "What are you giving up for Lent?" It doesn't have to be that way any longer. What's important is that some sacrifice is made to do penance for our shortcomings. This sacrifice can mean taking time to do something positive that will help others. As you mentioned, there are humanitarian organizations that would deeply appreciate someone helping out, even if it is temporary. There's a "catch" in that. Often people become involved and interested in a particular organization and continue to help out long after Lent is over. If each of us would do volunteer work for 1-2 hours a week, the results would be miraculous. Lent is sometimes the source of inspiration for this.

There's nothing wrong with giving up something -- that's a sacrfice, too, and involves will power to resist the temptation to dip into the cookie jar. During His 40 days in the desert, Jesus fasted -- another powerful means of penance for those who are healthy enough to handle that.

Whatever extras you do (or don't do) in His name are pleasing to the Good Lord, and your efforts will be recognized.

Feb 2nd 2013 new

I approach it as a time to give something up that I will really miss and to focus on renewed efforts of practices that I should really be carrying out through the entire year.

I'll probably try to give up listening to music because I really don't want to give it up... (is it true we can cheat on Sunday's?)

Blot out the popular culture as much as possible...(I hope EWTN has some good shows on)

I'll also try to overcome my laziness, wake up earlier, and go to Mass more during the week...

I will also attempt to see those moments during each day that provide oppurtunities to practice little acts of penance, sacrifices, mortifications of tongue, eyes, ears etc.

In other words...set myself up for failure...as usual...

Feb 2nd 2013 new

Jim, I admire the things you want to set out to do in striving to grow closer to the Lord this Lent. But failure? Come on. What about choosing one or two of those things and focus on that?

Feb 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Annie-892455 said: Jim, I admire the things you want to set out to do in striving to grow closer to the Lord this Le...
(Quote) Annie-892455 said:

Jim, I admire the things you want to set out to do in striving to grow closer to the Lord this Lent. But failure? Come on. What about choosing one or two of those things and focus on that?

--hide--

scratchchin Well Annie, I should be able to get my butt to Mass one or two more times a week....And it won't be so difficult to keep the TV off and grab a good religious book instead....It's the quitting music cold turkey that concerns me...but I guess as long as I go in with my expectations for myself low...I should be ok....It's a long time to go without listening to a U2 song.... wink



Feb 2nd 2013 new
You could always adopt the traditional Eastern Catholic fast of no meat, no dairy, no eggs and no fish.

It was embraced by St. Thomas Aquinas who writes:

Fasting was instituted by the Church in order to bridle the concupiscences of the flesh, which regard pleasures of touch in connection with food and sex. Wherefore the Church forbade those who fast to partake of those foods which both afford most pleasure to the palate, and besides are a very great incentive to lust. Such are the flesh of animals that take their rest on the earth, and of those that breath the air and their products, such as milk and eggs. (ST II-II, q. 147, a.8)
Feb 2nd 2013 new

I usually give something else up and I was thinking this year to do something more as well.

I remember during my senior in high school, I gave up chocolate (for me it was hard). I went on a retreat near the beginning of Lent and at that retreat everyone was encouraged to bring treats to share (not sure if I brought anything or not) and of course all the treats had chocolate in them, there were chocolate brownies, chocolate chip cookies, oreos, chocolate cake, chocolate ice cream, and other chocolatey delights. It was hard, so very hard sorry sad weeping but I made it through, I survived biggrin

Feb 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: You could always adopt the traditional Eastern Catholic fast of no meat, no dairy, no eggs and no fish. <...
(Quote) John-220051 said: You could always adopt the traditional Eastern Catholic fast of no meat, no dairy, no eggs and no fish.

It was embraced by St. Thomas Aquinas who writes:

Fasting was instituted by the Church in order to bridle the concupiscences of the flesh, which regard pleasures of touch in connection with food and sex. Wherefore the Church forbade those who fast to partake of those foods which both afford most pleasure to the palate, and besides are a very great incentive to lust. Such are the flesh of animals that take their rest on the earth, and of those that breath the air and their products, such as milk and eggs. (ST II-II, q. 147, a.8)
--hide--


I thought about fasting this way a couple years ago were I tried not to each any meat or dairy produts for all of Lent. It did not last long, since I was living at home and my parents did not understand why I wanted to give up meat and dairy for all of Lent.

I've read many great advantages to fasting to help both spiritually and physically.

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