Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match! Sign Up for Free
A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for discussion for anyone who adheres to the Extraordinary form of the mass and any issues related to the practices of Eastern Rite Catholicism.

Saint Athanasius is counted as one of the four Great Doctors of the Church.
Learn More:Saint Athanasius

02/11/2013 new

(Quote) John-842063 said: I am not convinced- why do you think so? And am I wrong.. I saw on the news that t...
(Quote) John-842063 said:

I am not convinced- why do you think so?

And am I wrong.. I saw on the news that to be elected one

must be a baptised catholic- I really think I was taught that ANYONE

could be elected pope- anyone whom the college decided to choose?

--hide--

Not quite. The Cardinals may, in fact, elect any baptized, practising Catholic man to the Papacy. The chances of anyone other than a Cardinal being elected are rather slim. Under no circumstances can they elect a women, no matter how holy or worthy.

LOCKED
02/11/2013 new

So, my recollection is of a bishop elected before he was baptised- too late at night for me to google that one...

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

(Quote) John-842063 said: So, my recollection is of a bishop elected before he was baptised- too late at night for me to goo...
(Quote) John-842063 said:

So, my recollection is of a bishop elected before he was baptised- too late at night for me to google that one...

--hide--

As I remember, that did happen sometime in the first 500 years of the Church. However, before he took office, he was baptized, received all the other pertinent sacraments as well as ordination to the priesthood and then consecrated as a Bishop.

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

(Quote) Edward-4511 said: I would like to emphasize ignoring the "chicken Little chorus". There was a...
(Quote) Edward-4511 said:


I would like to emphasize ignoring the "chicken Little chorus". There was a commenter somewhere on Facebook going on about the so called "St. Malachy prophecy" and that there is only one papal tomb left (as if they can't build more .... even if they run out of space at St. Peter's Basilica, not all popes are buried there and there are plenty of churches around Rome where a future Pope could be buried).

--hide--

Too true. Couldnt agree more. The recent History Channel programme on the Vatican they mentioned plans already exist to expand the Crypt, so the conspiracy theorists will have to find another theory. Especially as the Holy Father is on sick call, theyll have to make the crypt large enough to fit a living Pope, I mean hell need a flat to live in, Im assuming they arent going to bury him alive.

Seriously though I admire the man, he is a great Pope better than JPII or Paul VI, a true Christian who was leading back to core values.

I understand he will eventually move to a convent. I mean its every mans drean. Ritire to not a care or worry in the world to do nothing all day surrounded by women who are willing to do everything for you without complaint. The only thing are there Convents in the Seychelle Islands? laughing cool mischievous

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Shocked. Concerned. Pondering the spiritual/historic significance of this announcement on the Feast of Ou...
(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Shocked. Concerned. Pondering the spiritual/historic significance of this announcement on the Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes.

God Bless Pope Benedict XVI!

Blessed Pope John Paul II, pray for us and intercede!
--hide--

Relax The Church has been around for 2000+years and is still intact. Pope Benedict is a good man and stated he prayed and was moved by the Holy Spirit to abdicate, so the Holy Spirit will supply the right man for the job as He always has.

One thing is for sure the man we expect to be Pope will not be the one He will choose. But he will be the right one.

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: I worry that a Modernist will be elected who will undo Pope Benedict's accomplishments. We can't ...
(Quote) John-220051 said: I worry that a Modernist will be elected who will undo Pope Benedict's accomplishments. We can't go back to having a Pope who promotes religious indifferentism and sows more confusion among the faithful.
--hide--

As I said no need to worry. The new Pope will be the right man for the role, modernist (what ever that is), tradionalist, communist, socialist, futurist, Medievialist, Black, White, Asian or Middle Eastern, he will be the right man for the job choosen by the Holy Spirit for the comming century and challenges.

Instead of praying for what we dont want we should pray that the man who takes th throne has the help, direction and support of the Church, and will reconcile Rome with her strayed sheep from Protestant strays.

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

(Quote) Paul-866591 said: As I remember, that did happen sometime in the first 500 years of the Church. However, be...
(Quote) Paul-866591 said:

As I remember, that did happen sometime in the first 500 years of the Church. However, before he took office, he was baptized, received all the other pertinent sacraments as well as ordination to the priesthood and then consecrated as a Bishop.

--hide--

142? Pope Gregory X

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

(Quote) Paul-866591 said: Not quite. The Cardinals may, in fact, elect any baptized, practising Catholic man to the...
(Quote) Paul-866591 said:

Not quite. The Cardinals may, in fact, elect any baptized, practising Catholic man to the Papacy. The chances of anyone other than a Cardinal being elected are rather slim. Under no circumstances can they elect a women, no matter how holy or worthy.

--hide--

Indeed you are correct any Priest may be elected Pope. The only stipulation is that he can only be elected by the College of Cardinals, the Cardinals must be below the age of 80 years, the candidate must still be free to deliver all the sacraments, in otherwords is not a under discipline or restriction. They must be theological competent and of sound mind.

The Holy Spirit moves in mysterious ways

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

I have always been so proud of him. He really stood strong through all the scandal and criticism. He is such a good fighter, courageous leader, and gentle shepherd. He refused to compromise the Fatih. Did you know that he tried to retire twice under JP II? But JP II would not accept his retirement. And he is the only pope in history to ever compare the papacy to a guillotine falling over his head. So, I can't say that I am too surprised. He must be quite battle weary from a post that he has been reluctant to accept from the beginning. Even though he was reluctant, I don't think anyone can say that he has done a half-hearted job or has not put his all. I think that he has done his best to follow his conscience and lead the Church to what he believed was the right path despite all the challenges. He was not perfect, of course. But I think he really is a person who fights hard to always follow his conscience and glorify God. Truly God's Rottweiler.

Though I think he would continue to be great as a leader and am anguished over his leaving, I respect and admire his decision since I know that it must have come from a very serious examination of conscience and selflessness. I have always admired that he never needed the spotlight or be overbearing, but remained quiet yet strong and resolute. I will really miss him. I feel like I am saying farewell to a venerable, gentle little grandpa.

LOCKED
02/12/2013 new

(Quote) Patrick-624504 said: 142? Pope Gregory X
(Quote) Patrick-624504 said:

142? Pope Gregory X

--hide--

Sorry misread Pauls post. Here are couple of world opinions from around the world you may be interested in.

www.washingtontimes.com

www.mirror.co.uk

www.dailymail.co.uk

www.dailymail.co.uk

www.irishtimes.com

just a few I found may be grist for the mill.

Electing the Next Pope Who Can Be Elected Pope?

ByAustin Cline,

Technically, any Catholic male who has reached the age of reason, is not a heretic, is not in schism, and is not “notorious” for simony can be elected pope — there is no other requirement for election (although there are several requirements before a person can actually assume the papacy once elected). It might even be technically possible for them to elect a non-Catholic male, if they had reason to believe that he would immediately convert to Catholicism.

The lack of a long list of formal requirements is probably due to the fact that, in times past, it was possible for the elector cardinals to elect a new pope not through formal ballots but rather through sudden acclamation after being inspired. A list of formal rules would make such acclamation much more difficult, even though the rules have now eliminated acclamation (as well as the use of committees) to elect new popes.

In practice, of course, Catholic laity and even common clergy have no real chance to be elected pope and the papacy is restricted to cardinals or perhaps a few bishops. The last non-cardinal elected pope wasUrban VIin 1379. Certain cardinals may be more likely to be elected than others (because of age, for example), but within that group there is no way to say who is the favorite.

Indeed, it may be more likely that a non-favorite could be elected. Every “favorite” may be favored by a different group but no group may be able to get the others to accept their candidate. As a consequence, the man finally elected may be no one’s favorite, but ultimately the only man that enough of the cardinals can actually agree upon.

In another informal nod to tradition, the next pope will certainly have to speak Italian. Most people regard the pope as simply the head of the Roman Catholic Church, and that he is; but we must not forget that he is also the Bishop of Rome, and as such he carries with him the same responsibilities of all bishops. Indeed, no one can become pope officially until they are also officially made bishop in Rome.

One of the sources of the the great popularity of Pope John XXIIIwas apparently the fact that he acted like the Bishop of Rome more than most popes. He visited prisons, visited hospitals, and took a genuine interest in the lives and fortunes of the average Roman citizen. This was as unusual as it was appropriate and it helped guarantee his place in the hearts and minds of Romans for generations to come.

If the next pope cannot address the crowds in Rome in their own language, he won’t be readily accepted or highly regarded. This may not be the “mob” of antiquity, but it seems unlikely that the elector cardinals will completely ignore their needs when it comes to choosing the next pope. The exclusion of non-Italian speakers may not narrow the field of likely popes very far, but it does narrow it.

The formal naming of a new pope, just like the election process itself, is heavily defined by long-standing traditions. A person doesn’t simply get a phone call or short applause; instead, they are invested with the title and vestments of his new office in a manner that harkens back to the days when a pope was as much a temporal as spiritual ruler.

Once elected, the new pope is asked by the Dean of the College of Cardinals if he accepts the election (“Do you accept your canonical election as Supreme Pontiff?”) and, if so, what new name he would like to be known as. At this point he officially becomes Pontifex Maximus, or the Holy Roman Pontiff. The other cardinals pledge their allegiance to him and he is dressed in the pontifical vestments, a white soutane and skull cap. This occurs in “The Room of Tears,” so called because it is common for a new pope to break down and cry now that the magnitude of what has befallen them becomes clear.

If for some reason a lay person were elected, the Dean of the College of Cardinals would first have to ordain him to the appropriate clerical offices, from priest through bishop, before he could take over the post of Bishop of Rome that is required of all popes. If he is already a bishop somewhere, it is tradition that he set aside that post.

The Dean of the College of Cardinals then exits the conclave to announce to the world:

Annuntio vobis gaudium magnum. Habemus Papam. Eminentissimus et Reverendissimus Dominus, Dominus ___ Sanctae Romanae Ecclesiae Cardinalis Qui sibi accipit nomen ___.(I announce to you a great joy. We have a Pope. The most eminent and reverend Lord, the Lord ___ Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church Who takes to himself the name __)

The new pontiff then appears alongside the Dean to deliver an Apostolic Blessing. Traditionally the new pope is then carried on a Sedia Gestatoria (Papal Throne) around St. Peter’s and has a Papal Tiara ceremoniously placed on his head. This monarchial symbolism has lost much of its luster in modern times and Pope John Paul I abolished it. No further “ordination” or “coronation” is required after a person has accepted their election as papacy; theologically, there is no one “above” the pope with the authority necessary to do such a thing.

A few days after a successful election, the first Papal Mass is held at St. Peter’s. While walking to the altar, the whole procession stops three times to burn a piece of flax that has been mounted on a reed. As the flames go out, someone says quietly to the new pope “Pater sancte, sic transit gloria mundi” (“Holy Father, thus passes the glory of the world”). This is meant to remind the pope that, despite his powerful position, he remains a mortal who will also die someday.

atheism.about.com

This might answer the question

LOCKED
Posts 31 - 40 of 200