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confession

02/17/2013 new

I am not sure about anyone else but I really wish that we could be blessed with priests today like Padre Pio or St. John Vianney who stay in the confessional for hours at end to hear confessions and not a mere 30 minutes to an hour once a week before Saturday evening mass and priests that can read souls. I also don't get who some priests change the words to the absolution prayer. Comments...

02/17/2013 new

Yes, having Padre Pio as your confessor would be nice. Praying

Back to reality... I've found that priests at more traditional churches (TLM, churches run by Opus Dei or other conservative orders) are not only available more frequently for confession (usually before every Mass), but are also "stricter" in confession (for lack of a better word). By that, I mean they will tell you what you need to change in your life and how you can grow in your spiritual life, and they are not as concerned about making you feel all "warm and fuzzy" in confession.

02/17/2013 new

I'm not sure if there is enough demand for confession to support a priest spending hours in a confessional. This would take them from other duties and many are overworked as it is.

The idea of sin and being sinner is not in vogue these days if it was there would be more demand for confession.

Sometimes when I go to confession I'm not always asked to say an Act of Contrition. And sometimes my penance at one parish is to just sit in the church for a while and reflect.

02/17/2013 new
There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious rather than diocesan priests. Also, priests of Opus Dei hear confessions for hours on end. We must be gentle on our poor parish priests. They get attacked from all sides. They get dumped on. The get complained about. The bishops get anonymous letters about them. It's a wonder they all don't quit in disgust or get roaring drunk every night. Every minute of their time belongs to someone else and more often than not, that person is ungrateful. Look around and you'll find priests in your diocese who hear confessions all the time.
02/18/2013 new

The town I grew up in, the local Parish only had confession once a week for half an hour, 2nd rite service before Easter and no increase before Christmas.

Where I go to Church now, there's half hourly sessions each day except Sunday. And there are several other churches in the local diocese that have at least two sessions a day, and one Church having a session on Sunday! Our priests also take appointments if we want a longer confession. Because sometimes theres a good 20 people waiting for confession in that 30 minute block.

Where I am now is kinda old skool, so there's obviously a demand for it.

But more and more I'm hearing a lot of catholics ask why even bother? The Protestant "once saved always saved" nonsense is creeping in. The stupid "well, if I say I sorry to God in my prayers than I'm okay, I don't need to tell a priest".

Once again, it all boils down to educating the faithful.

02/18/2013 new
(Quote) David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious rather than...
(Quote) David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious rather than diocesan priests. Also, priests of Opus Dei hear confessions for hours on end.

We must be gentle on our poor parish priests. They get attacked from all sides. They get dumped on. The get complained about. The bishops get anonymous letters about them. It's a wonder they all don't quit in disgust or get roaring drunk every night. Every minute of their time belongs to someone else and more often than not, that person is ungrateful. Look around and you'll find priests in your diocese who hear confessions all the time.
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lol David....I'm sure they all do get roaring drunk....

I have such admiration for all priests....and it really is a shame all they have to go thru; but yes, I wish they were more available for confessions, but as pointed out, most are willing to see you privately.
02/18/2013 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious ra...
(Quote) David-364112 said: There are plenty of priests who spend HOURS in the confessional every week. They tend to be religious rather than diocesan priests. Also, priests of Opus Dei hear confessions for hours on end. We must be gentle on our poor parish priests. They get attacked from all sides. They get dumped on. The get complained about. The bishops get anonymous letters about them. It's a wonder they all don't quit in disgust or get roaring drunk every night. Every minute of their time belongs to someone else and more often than not, that person is ungrateful. Look around and you'll find priests in your diocese who hear confessions all the time.
--hide--

Yes, I agree with you David that we all must be gentle and kind to all praish priests. I guess the question I posed earlier about there only being confession once a week for 30 minutes to an hour came to mind as I was waiting for confession and the line for people wishing for their confession to be heard was getting longer and I know there were times where I wondered if I would make it through before the priest had to leave, which is the reason for my question.

To me, it would be wonderful to live near a parish or a relgious group that offered confession everyday. The parishes around where I live only offer it once a week which I guess is fair. Yet, still I think it would be awesome to go into a confession and have the priest read my soul like Padre Pio did to those who went to him for confession.

02/18/2013 new

(Quote) Naomi-698107 said: The town I grew up in, the local Parish only had confession once a week for half an hour, 2nd rit...
(Quote) Naomi-698107 said:

The town I grew up in, the local Parish only had confession once a week for half an hour, 2nd rite service before Easter and no increase before Christmas.

Where I go to Church now, there's half hourly sessions each day except Sunday. And there are several other churches in the local diocese that have at least two sessions a day, and one Church having a session on Sunday! Our priests also take appointments if we want a longer confession. Because sometimes theres a good 20 people waiting for confession in that 30 minute block.

Where I am now is kinda old skool, so there's obviously a demand for it.

But more and more I'm hearing a lot of catholics ask why even bother? The Protestant "once saved always saved" nonsense is creeping in. The stupid "well, if I say I sorry to God in my prayers than I'm okay, I don't need to tell a priest".

Once again, it all boils down to educating the faithful.

--hide--


Yes, I would agree it is more than likely education. I grew up in a lukewarm cafeteria catholic home where the faith was hardly if ever taught. I only went to confession three times (once for First Reconciliation and once at two different retreats) up until was I a senior in high school because the importance of the sacraments was not taught to myself or my sisters. It was not until I was in college that I found the importance of confession and the sacraments and I look at my family and wonder why, why they never taught about the sacraments. I try to place little hints to them about how important it is to go to confession, etc but right now, I feel I can only pray for my family. Both my sisters feel that they only need to tell God that they are sorry in their prayers and that they will be fine.

That is awesome that you go to a church that offers confession everyday.

02/18/2013 new

Penance needs to be elevated to the level that we celebrate the other Sacraments. All of the other Sacraments (even Supreme Unction) are events shared with family and loved ones. With the exception of Penance and Supreme Unction, all of the Sacraments are joyful events featuring special Masses, blessings, gifts, clothes, and receptions. Penance is the one Sacrament we receive alone, traditionally communicated through whispers in a tiny closet late on a Saturday afternoon. Sometimes priests will deliver a sermon on the necessity of Penance (usually during Lent), but rarely do they stress the joy one receives through Penance and the grace of reconciliation.

I know that too many Catholics do not give too much regard to Penance, or perhaps they do not understand the grace we receive through absolution. I might see one or two dozen people waiting for confession every Saturday. But I see nearly the entire congregation receiving Communion the next day at Mass. But then again, I can't remember the last time I heard a preist sermonize on the fallacy of receiving Communion while not in a state of Grace.

02/18/2013 new

(Quote) John-146319 said: Penance needs to be elevated to the level that we celebrate the other Sacraments. All of the other...
(Quote) John-146319 said:

Penance needs to be elevated to the level that we celebrate the other Sacraments. All of the other Sacraments (even Supreme Unction) are events shared with family and loved ones. With the exception of Penance and Supreme Unction, all of the Sacraments are joyful events featuring special Masses, blessings, gifts, clothes, and receptions. Penance is the one Sacrament we receive alone, traditionally communicated through whispers in a tiny closet late on a Saturday afternoon. Sometimes priests will deliver a sermon on the necessity of Penance (usually during Lent), but rarely do they stress the joy one receives through Penance and the grace of reconciliation.

I know that too many Catholics do not give too much regard to Penance, or perhaps they do not understand the grace we receive through absolution. I might see one or two dozen people waiting for confession every Saturday. But I see nearly the entire congregation receiving Communion the next day at Mass. But then again, I can't remember the last time I heard a preist sermonize on the fallacy of receiving Communion while not in a state of Grace.

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The proper term is not "Supreme Unction" but "Extreme Unction".

Prior to Vatican II that Sacrament was administered only to the dying. But that was because the old meaning and purpose of the Sacrament had somehow been lost over the years. VII brought it back to its original meaning and intent. Hence it is now called the Sacrament of the sick (and dying.)

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