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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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We've all heard that we are to rest from servile labor on Sundays and to attend Mass. The latter (Mass attendance) is pretty clear and cut and dry. The former is a bit more vague. scratchchin

A priest told me recently that to rest from servile labor means that you rest from the job that you do for a living, so if you are a bricklayer, you don't lay bricks on Sundays, if you are a lawyer, you don't write briefs, etc. (If you must work on Sunday because you are an ER doc or because you work at Walmart and have no choice, that's a different story). He also said Sunday shouldn't become our weekly "cleaning day" or our shopping day, although a bit of cleaning, cooking and general chores are ok on Sunday.

So my question to you is: What do you consider ok and not ok for Sunday activities? Do you shop on Sundays? Does it make a difference if the shopping is for groceries (a chore) versus for fun things? Do you do laundry on Sundays? Other than attending Mass, which goes without saying, what are the practical ways in which you keep the Sabbath holy?

Feb 25th 2013 new
Usually I cook Sunday dinner - and often a pot of soup or stew for my elderly parents. They can eat that for 2 or 3 days. Sometimes I do light housework or yard work. I am a lawyer and work every Saturday. Once in a while I put in a long Sunday at the office. When I was a young associate, there were always certain partners who'd look around on Friday afternoon for whoever was there and assign work that would take all weekend to complete. It always had to be done by Monday but then they'd never look at it for days after it was turned in. So I went in house. Now I'm a partner at a small firm. All that means is I don't have a salary. Only paid for what I do. Our poor associate (Catholic father of 3 young kids) is always there on Sundays. No jerky partners making him do this; he's just overworked. I never give him work because my practice is in an area of law (shopping center leases) different from what he and the others do (corporate stuff and securities law). When I confess working on Sundays the priest rarely acts like its a serious sin.
Feb 25th 2013 new

(Quote) Lisa-54615 said: (Quote) A priest told me recently that to rest from servile labor means that you r...
(Quote) Lisa-54615 said:

Quote:

A priest told me recently that to rest from servile labor means that you rest from the job that you do for a living, so if you are a bricklayer, you don't lay bricks on Sundays, if you are a lawyer, you don't write briefs, etc. (If you must work on Sunday because you are an ER doc or because you work at Walmart and have no choice, that's a different story). He also said Sunday shouldn't become our weekly "cleaning day" or our shopping day, although a bit of cleaning, cooking and general chores are ok on Sunday.[quote]
--hide--

Oh my dear, if I do not do my work on the Sunday, my kids will be hungry & they will not have clean clothes. I am a single mother to two lovely children who do try and help me around the house. I lost my husband and to support the family I have to work. I am the breadwinner of the family, the teacher, the mother and the father and the taxi driver, etcetcetc.

Sunday is my only free day to catch up. I keep the day holy by having some quiet time with my God in the morning, then we all go to mass and spend some time after mass with the Catholic community. I try to relax and spend some quality times with my girls but then if I do not do groceries, cooking and cleaning, the rest of the week I work.


I must say I do pray unceasingly while I do all my chores, and wherever I am, but that goes for all days 7/7.

I know my heavenly Father loves me and his heart is big enough to accept my Sunday.


Concerning work, I used to work as a nurse, so would it mean I should stay at home and let my patients suffer rolling eyes . Remember the saying of Jesus regarding the Sabbath - he too was accused of working on the Sabbath.

God Bless you





Feb 25th 2013 new

(Quote) Lisa-54615 said: We've all heard that we are to rest from servile labor on Sundays and to attend Mass. The latte...
(Quote) Lisa-54615 said:

We've all heard that we are to rest from servile labor on Sundays and to attend Mass. The latter (Mass attendance) is pretty clear and cut and dry. The former is a bit more vague.

A priest told me recently that to rest from servile labor means that you rest from the job that you do for a living, so if you are a bricklayer, you don't lay bricks on Sundays, if you are a lawyer, you don't write briefs, etc. (If you must work on Sunday because you are an ER doc or because you work at Walmart and have no choice, that's a different story). He also said Sunday shouldn't become our weekly "cleaning day" or our shopping day, although a bit of cleaning, cooking and general chores are ok on Sunday.

So my question to you is: What do you consider ok and not ok for Sunday activities? Do you shop on Sundays? Does it make a difference if the shopping is for groceries (a chore) versus for fun things? Do you do laundry on Sundays? Other than attending Mass, which goes without saying, what are the practical ways in which you keep the Sabbath holy?

--hide--

Pope John Paul II wrote an encyclical entitled "Dies Domini." It is relatively short and worth reading. It may provide some perspective on the subject.

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