Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match! Sign Up for Free

info: Please Sign Up or Sign In to continue.

A place to learn, mingle, and share

Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
Learn More: Tobias & Sarah as led by Saint Raphael

Mar 18th 2013 new

(Quote) Chuka-941523 said: Hi Naomi, this seems to be somewhat true in western world, but ironically it is not ...
(Quote) Chuka-941523 said:


Hi Naomi, this seems to be somewhat true in western world, but ironically it is not always the case in general. In fact, in my home country, it's almost the opposite as intellectuals, CEOs, and very higly educated individuals regardless of career path are still strongly devoted to God. This is probably because the general attitude of many back home is "whatever I am today, it is by God's grace".. an attitude which I notice to be somewhat lacking in western worlds where more people believe humans are in full control of everything in life. Since the western attitude leans more towards "I can be whatever I want to be", as an intellectual who has put in years of personal hardwork it may be harder to see God through one's career success

--hide--

scratchchin Well, the intellectual revolution of the past few hundred years had lead many western countries down the garden path with empty promises and talk of wonders. Satan has long been at work, using our weaknesses against us.

Mar 19th 2013 new

Chuka,


I do think that you are on to something when you seem to find "..... that people of certain careers (usually careers that require critical thinking such as science and technology/research)" may have a conflict with faith.


I've been a mechanical engineer for over 25 years now... and Catholic from day one. I personally have never had any such conflict. However, I could see how some people would have conflicts.


I don't know that it is that they "tend to seek deterministic and empirical "proof" for God's existence and also believe they are in "control" of everything and thus no "Greater Being" exists, regardless of religion?".... as you wrote. I tend to believe that it has more to do with the actual beliefs of their particular religion.


For a Catholic, I don't see any conflicts between religious beliefs and science/engineering. Catholics believe in faith and reason. Also, they don't necessarily believe in a literal interpretation of the bible. I find that my science and engineering work actually strengthens my faith. The more that I learn about subjects such as astronomy, robotics, geology, archaeology, the physical sciences and the natural sciences, the greater my appreciation for the brilliance, complexity and simplicity of how everything was "put together" in the first place. It seems quite far-fetched to me that the whole of this universe and everything in it is just a big coincidence or "roll of the dice".


Now for someone of a very fundamentalist religion and a very literal interpretation of the bible, I can see many conflicts. Some of these conflicts could include (in no particular order) >>> 1) Was the earth (and everything on it) created in 6 days or millions/billions of years? 2) What about all those dinasaur bones? 3) What about the Big Bang theory? 4) Could there be inteligent life on other planets? 5) If there is intelligent life somewhere else, would they also have a "Savior"? 6) Why is so much of human DNA so similar to the DNA of all other animals? 7) Why is human DNA very, very similar to that of other primates if we are in no way evolutionarily-related to them? 8) How best to explain the bible story of Noah's Arc and the great flood? 9) Why do we find sea shells on some mountain tops if the Earth is so young? 10) How do we explain why radiocarbon dating works? ....... I'm sure there are many, many other potential conflicts too. With all these potential conflicts between science and fundamentalist religions, I could see how some people could lose their faith. No such conflicts arise between the Catholic faith and science/engineering.


Just my thoughts.


Ed

Mar 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Naomi-825244 said:Not to be judgemental or make sweeping judgements, but atheism is a disease largly of the intellectual. T...
(Quote) Naomi-825244 said:Not to be judgemental or make sweeping judgements, but atheism is a disease largly of the intellectual. The simpleton tending sheep is much less likely to disbeleive the existance of God than the intellectual giving a lecture on nuclear fusion. Many people on this discussion have already alluded to the fact that this along with every other attrocity man is capable of committing are largly a matter of enculturation, of accepting something that everyone else does because I don't want to be an odd ball.

I think that, for some strange and largly as yet unexplained reason, people get the feeling that the existance of God has been scientifically disproved, or at least that it is unsupportable. All that has really happened is that Atheism or Agnosticism has been part of the scientific culture for hundreds of years due to loudmouths throughout history who really didn't know what they were talking about. A good example of this is Darwin's Origin of Species, which has been disproved many times over and was never recognized as fact among the more discerning intellectuals even of his day, but it is still clung to by so many people today. I am not here discounting the evolutionary process in general or the possibility that God may have used evolution to accomplish much of His work here on earth. I am merely pointing out that though it could not have happened in the way that Darwin states, people still hold him up as a great thinker and intellectual, and many poor, thoughtless, self made peole use his theory as a foundation of their own lives. White coats, bow ties, spectacles, and atheism give you a pretty solid picture of a scientist, doctor, or teacher.

--hide--

I agree that atheism largly is a disease of the intellectual. It is up to those of us who are scientifically oriented and does believe in God to show the atheists that there is no contradiction between God and science.

If Darwin's theory of evolution has been disproved in such a way that you describe why do you think it still is the foundation of modern evolutionary biology?

Mar 19th 2013 new

(Quote) Susan-940526 said: Thanks for all the great posts. I hope I don't repeat to much but I will share my experience....
(Quote) Susan-940526 said:

Thanks for all the great posts. I hope I don't repeat to much but I will share my experience.

My Agnosticism stems from my hypersensitivity. I feel wounded so often by the news, current event and t he world we live in in general. Many people turn towards God in these times. For me and my sensitivities, I constantly questioned "where is God?"

I've worked in human and veterinary medicine and have seen some terrible things. Abused children and pets. Heartbreaking. I can see how one could disbelieve after years of exposure to this. I had to leave the field for awhile. And now I'm finding my w ay back to God. I hope I can one day be as learned and devout as so many of you here. And go back into my field. And bring God with me!


I do hope that in the meantime people would be patient and kind to those who struggle with faith.

--hide--

This is pretty much where I am, Susan. Something that might help you: a priest recently suggested I read the story of the raising of Lazarus. I read the entire thing (John chapter 9, I believe). It got to the heart of this question, I think, because Mary and Martha tell Christ, "Sir, if you had been here, my brother would not have died." This is the same as saying, "Where were you??" And then Christ goes to the tomb and weeps openly with them. It hit me then that Christ grieves with us in every suffering that happens.

I guess you could look at the situation and say: see! He knows what's going on and how painful it is and He still lets it happen! But last Saturday when I read this passage, I felt like Christ was weeping with me in everything I've suffered. It made me wonder if God somehow would prevent these evils if He could, but cannot because His Will will bring something greater out of it and He cannot go against His own Will.

It's really, really hard to accept, I know. I feel like the pain of things that have happend to me are a mountain standing between God and I which I must climb over before I can be with Him again.

I can't imagaine standing by and watching someone suffer without helping them as I feel God does sometimes. But God is not us. For reasons unknown to us, I believe that He cannot step in. But, by weeping with Mary and Martha over the death of their brother and dying on the Cross for us, I think He's saying that He cannot prevent all suffering, but He will enter into the suffering with us. For some reason, that gave me a lot of comfort.

I hope God brings you closer to Him soon and that you experience joy in contemplating Him once again.

Mar 21st 2013 new

Well, it has a lot to do with human nature and people just following what they think is the thing that everyone else believes. The documentary "Expelled" has a ton to say on this topic.

Mar 21st 2013 new

(Quote) Justin-32820 said: I hope you not calling me old but at 28 we are basically in the same age group Also, I&#...
(Quote) Justin-32820 said:

I hope you not calling me old but at 28 we are basically in the same age group Also, I've worked most of my career in education and I have come across home schooled students before.

--hide--

Homeschool has its own culture....while we are 10 years apart, what happend to views of homeschooling and the people who homeschooled in that time is startling signfigant. You stating that homeschooling was mostly protestant and evangelicals and that sort really just proves to me that you don't know from experiance what's going on in the HS world today. A decade is a big deal when it comes to alot of things, growing up with computers, electronic devices, homeschool....It's a different world...there is a digital and cultural divide and you're on the other side.

Mar 21st 2013 new

(Quote) Naomi-825244 said: Well, it has a lot to do with human nature and people just following what they think is the thing...
(Quote) Naomi-825244 said:

Well, it has a lot to do with human nature and people just following what they think is the thing that everyone else believes. The documentary "Expelled" has a ton to say on this topic.

--hide--
I sincerely hope you don't have this documentary as a foundation for your statement: "Darwin's Origin of Species has been disproved many times over".

Mar 23rd 2013 new

(Quote) Marian-83994 said: You are living near where I used to live as a child.
(Quote) Marian-83994 said: You are living near where I used to live as a child.
--hide--


Hi Marian, that's good to know.. it's a very nice and peaceful neighborhood, and I can imagine how much you must have enjoyed growing up here smile

Mar 23rd 2013 new

(Quote) ED-20630 said: Some of these conflicts could include (in no particular order) >>> 1) Was the eart...
(Quote) ED-20630 said: Some of these conflicts could include (in no particular order) >>> 1) Was the earth (and everything on it) created in 6 days or millions/billions of years?...
--hide--

Hi ED, those are very deep thoughts.. thanks for sharing them. I'm glad that after having such thoughts you realize that science/engineering principles do not conflict with religious beliefs, but rather should be a source of strengthening for one's faith. God bless! theheart

Mar 23rd 2013 new

(Quote) Renee-288471 said: (Quote) Justin-32820 said: I hope you not calling me old but at 2...
(Quote) Renee-288471 said:

Quote:
Justin-32820 said:

I hope you not calling me old but at 28 we are basically in the same age group Also, I've worked most of my career in education and I have come across home schooled students before.


Homeschool has its own culture....while we are 10 years apart, what happend to views of homeschooling and the people who homeschooled in that time is startling signfigant. You stating that homeschooling was mostly protestant and evangelicals and that sort really just proves to me that you don't know from experiance what's going on in the HS world today. A decade is a big deal when it comes to alot of things, growing up with computers, electronic devices, homeschool....It's a different world...there is a digital and cultural divide and you're on the other side.

[quote]

--hide--

Renee, sorry if I hit a nerve with you and I'm not claiming to be an expert on home schooling culture. I'm well aware that home schooling has grown over the years. But some of your comments got me curious so I googled it and according to this Catholic homeschooling website http://www.homeschoolingcatholic.com about 5 % of home schooled students are Catholic. Now, I don't know how good those numbers are, but are likely pretty close.

Posts 61 - 70 of 74