Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match! Sign Up for Free
A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
Learn More:Saint Thomas More

Apr 5th 2013 new

(Quote) Bernard-2709 said: Best Book on End Times The Book of...
(Quote) Bernard-2709 said:

Best Book on End Times

The Book of Destiny (Imprimatur) Fr. Herman Bernard Kramer (Author)

www.amazon.com

--hide--



Ever read anything by Fr. Fahey or Fr. Feeney? Fr. Coughlin had good stuff too.

Apr 5th 2013 new

(Quote) Marissa-529206 said: China has a strict no refugee policy....they would shoot them and I'm not really kidding. Actually...
(Quote) Marissa-529206 said: China has a strict no refugee policy....they would shoot them and I'm not really kidding. Actually, I could see China teaming up with N. Korea. China has almost weaned themselves perfectly away from us. Most of their exports no longer come over here and pretty much none of our stuff goes over there anymore. That would be bad though. Because China's navy has surpassed ours and we know that they have been selling weapons to many of our enemies. They probably could lick us. And we really don't have anyone to back us up.
--hide--

On what basis do you claim the Chinese navy has surpassed ours?

The U.S. is still China's single largest trading partner.

www.uschina.org

Apr 5th 2013 new

I agree with John's comments that the US is still China's single largest trading partner. Also, China has an interest in the U.S. being healthy financially, because we (US) own them a whole lot of money (a portion of our national debt).


Also, while China has put a lot of effort into beefing-up their navy in these past years, their navy really is not close to the US Navy in terms of total capability. Just two examples (aircraft carriers & submarines)....


Aircraft Carriers - By my count, the US current has 11 nuclear-powered aircraft carriers on active duty and two more under construction. The US carriers can run for somewhere between 13-20 years before refueling. China has just one diesel-powered aircraft carrier on active duty and it requires servicing (probably refueling) about every two weeks.


>>> reference www.navy.mil


>>> reference www.ukrainebusiness.com.ua


>>> reference www.ukrainebusiness.com.ua


In terms of submarines, at this time the US Navy still far surpasses China in terms of capability:


>>> reference thediplomat.com


The U.S. has had a "blue water" (ocean-going, anywhere in the world) navy for many, many years while China has historically had mostly a "brown-water" navy (staying primarily close to the coast-lines). Only within the past several years (or decade) has China focused more on a "blue-water" navy to eventually match that of the U.S.


Ed

Apr 5th 2013 new

Yes, I do believe that China would likely shoot-to-kill if North Korean refugees start to flow over their border.


There are many, many manufacturing ties between the U.S. and China. It is in neither contries' economic interest to have some sort of shooting war.


Ed

Apr 5th 2013 new

We are much safer in the short and long run when we have a very strong military. It is never in the interest of the U.S. when we appear to be weakened. The world simply isn't a soft, warm and fuzzy place.... and it almost certainly never will be.


Ed

Apr 5th 2013 new

I guess if we consider the entire European Union as a single trading partner, then the EU may just edge-out the USA as China's largest trading partner.


en.wikipedia.org


Ed

Apr 5th 2013 new

(Quote) Sean-851370 said: (Quote) Bernard-2709 said: Best Book on End Times
(Quote) Sean-851370 said:

Quote:
Bernard-2709 said:

Best Book on End Times

The Book of Destiny (Imprimatur) Fr. Herman Bernard Kramer (Author)

www.amazon.com





Ever read anything by Fr. Fahey or Fr. Feeney? Fr. Coughlin had good stuff too.

--hide--
Yes I have.Don't let John find out shhh

Apr 6th 2013 new
Any time now, and the war will begin! Let us pray. We don't need any more wars. Power and money and fame is a rooted evil. I pray for the conversion of North Korea and let the people free. Praying
Apr 6th 2013 new

(Quote) Brian-252799 said: I dont think the Korean War ever ended.You have the same warlike Stalinist government that was se...
(Quote) Brian-252799 said:

I dont think the Korean War ever ended.You have the same warlike Stalinist government that was set up by Russia in 1945.The Kim family has always wanted the same thing.To reunite Korea under Red Rule.

--hide--


Yes, sad to say, it's a continuing tragedy of a divided country caught between the super powers.


"An armistice treaty, signed on July 27, 1953, by representatives of the North Korean Army and its Chinese allies, on one side, and the UN Command led by the United States, on the other, put an end to all hostilities. But it did not end the war.

WWII could have paved the way for Korean liberation from colonialism, the way it did for many countries in Asia. Japan’s brutal 40-year rule over Korea, which had sought to obliterate all traces of Korean culture and identity, brought out a robust Korean patriotic resistance. It had two leaders—Kim Il Sung and Syngman Rhee—who, while they differed in ideology, agreed that a unified Korea should be emancipated from foreign rule.

It was not the Korean people’s will, however, that was to prevail in the aftermath of WWII, but rather the geostrategic calculations of the victorious world powers. On one hand, the Allies recognized the Soviet Union’s need to keep North Korea as a buffer zone, and indeed this was a condition for the Soviet entry into the Pacific theater of the war in 1945. On the other hand, the Americans saw how the spread of communism had become more pronounced when China’s communists won against the nationalists in 1949. In this unfolding scenario, they figured how important it was to turn a completely subdued but industrialized Japan into an ally against communism. Korea’s full independence from Japan was thus compromised when both countries became valuable pawns in the ensuing Cold War. Despite the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, that is pretty much where things have stood in the last 63 years.

We may scoff at the bizarre antics of the eccentric heirs of Kim Il Sung, but there must be a reason why the Kims continue to be revered in North Korea. The elder Kim fought to free his people from foreign rule. He gave them pride even if this meant going hungry and being left behind by a more prosperous South that, to this day, is secured by American troops.

If they were free to do so, most North Koreans today might move to the South where food and work abound. It is not easy to live under a dictatorship, and in isolation from the rest of the world, which is where they have been consigned by US-led economic sanctions. What makes this situation particularly tragic is that the impulse to reunify the country remains strong on both sides. The Koreans are, after all, one nation. But there are forces that benefit from keeping the country divided, and it is these that sadly fill the air with their voices when there is talk of war.

Kim Jong Un is a poor shadow of his grandfather, Kim Il Sung. No one takes his threats seriously. But we must take the yearnings of the Korean people seriously, and we can only do so if we are prepared to review the past. Paul Johnson once wrote: “The study of history is a powerful antidote to contemporary arrogance. It is humbling to discover how many of our glib assumptions… have been tested before… and discovered to be, at great human cost, wholly false.”


Apr 6th 2013 new

(Quote) Brian-252799 said: I dont think the Korean War ever ended.You have the same warlike Stalinist government that was se...
(Quote) Brian-252799 said:

I dont think the Korean War ever ended.You have the same warlike Stalinist government that was set up by Russia in 1945.The Kim family has always wanted the same thing.To reunite Korea under Red Rule.

--hide--


Yes, sad to say, it's a continuing tragedy of a divided country caught between the super powers.


"An armistice treaty, signed on July 27, 1953, by representatives of the North Korean Army and its Chinese allies, on one side, and the UN Command led by the United States, on the other, put an end to all hostilities. But it did not end the war.

WWII could have paved the way for Korean liberation from colonialism, the way it did for many countries in Asia. Japan’s brutal 40-year rule over Korea, which had sought to obliterate all traces of Korean culture and identity, brought out a robust Korean patriotic resistance. It had two leaders—Kim Il Sung and Syngman Rhee—who, while they differed in ideology, agreed that a unified Korea should be emancipated from foreign rule.

It was not the Korean people’s will, however, that was to prevail in the aftermath of WWII, but rather the geostrategic calculations of the victorious world powers. On one hand, the Allies recognized the Soviet Union’s need to keep North Korea as a buffer zone, and indeed this was a condition for the Soviet entry into the Pacific theater of the war in 1945. On the other hand, the Americans saw how the spread of communism had become more pronounced when China’s communists won against the nationalists in 1949. In this unfolding scenario, they figured how important it was to turn a completely subdued but industrialized Japan into an ally against communism. Korea’s full independence from Japan was thus compromised when both countries became valuable pawns in the ensuing Cold War. Despite the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s, that is pretty much where things have stood in the last 63 years.

We may scoff at the bizarre antics of the eccentric heirs of Kim Il Sung, but there must be a reason why the Kims continue to be revered in North Korea. The elder Kim fought to free his people from foreign rule. He gave them pride even if this meant going hungry and being left behind by a more prosperous South that, to this day, is secured by American troops.

If they were free to do so, most North Koreans today might move to the South where food and work abound. It is not easy to live under a dictatorship, and in isolation from the rest of the world, which is where they have been consigned by US-led economic sanctions. What makes this situation particularly tragic is that the impulse to reunify the country remains strong on both sides. The Koreans are, after all, one nation. But there are forces that benefit from keeping the country divided, and it is these that sadly fill the air with their voices when there is talk of war.

Kim Jong Un is a poor shadow of his grandfather, Kim Il Sung. No one takes his threats seriously. But we must take the yearnings of the Korean people seriously, and we can only do so if we are prepared to review the past. Paul Johnson once wrote: “The study of history is a powerful antidote to contemporary arrogance. It is humbling to discover how many of our glib assumptions… have been tested before… and discovered to be, at great human cost, wholly false.”


Posts 101 - 110 of 110