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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
Learn More: Tobias & Sarah as led by Saint Raphael

04/08/2013 new

(Quote) Carol-737878 said: Dana, You're right, the discussion on annulment needs to go to the Divorced room. ...
(Quote) Carol-737878 said:

Dana,

You're right, the discussion on annulment needs to go to the Divorced room.


Frank,

The information on grounds for nullity in any particular case can be obtained from any tribunal office or any valid resource. Suggestions can be found in the Divorced room.

--hide--

The person who asked the questions about annulments is not divorced, and thus is not able to discuss the topic in the Divorced forum.

I agree with the previous suggestion that the annulment questions belong in a different topic, discussing the questions in the abstract rather than giving the appearance (whether such was intended or not) of questioning the validity of a specific member's annulment.

04/08/2013 new

(Quote) Dave-146273 said: Dana said "jason" but i think she meant Frank.. and i agree.. let's be poli...
(Quote) Dave-146273 said:

Dana said "jason" but i think she meant Frank.. and i agree.. let's be polite to the Op and if anyone wants to discuss Annulments they can do so in another Thread. Thanks.

--hide--


I did so thanks for catching that. embarassed

04/08/2013 new

(Quote) Jerry-74383 said: The person who asked the questions about annulments is not divorced, and thus is not able...
(Quote) Jerry-74383 said:

The person who asked the questions about annulments is not divorced, and thus is not able to discuss the topic in the Divorced forum.

I agree with the previous suggestion that the annulment questions belong in a different topic, discussing the questions in the abstract rather than giving the appearance (whether such was intended or not) of questioning the validity of a specific member's annulment.

--hide--


Jerry, that's a good point. I guess I didn't check his marital status. He could read through the treads, though, and maybe gain some insight. It is not any easy or pleasant process to go through. I don't think any of us intended to be where we are today so maybe we could just pray for each other and ask for God's blessings for each of us. Praying Praying

04/08/2013 new

(Quote) Frank-410833 said: (Quote) Bernard-2709 said: No such thing as a Schismatic Annulment in the Catholi...
(Quote) Frank-410833 said:
Quote:
Bernard-2709 said:

No such thing as a Schismatic Annulment in the Catholic Church.There are cases where perfectly valid marriages can be dissolved.They are called Pauline Privilege,and Petrine Privilege en.wikipedia.org




The Pauline Privilege does not apply when two baptized people marry and later one quits being Christian. These people had a sacramental marriage forged between them, and this marriage is indissoluble, even if one partner is failing to fulfill his marital responsibilities. In that case 1 Corinthians 7:10-11, which concerns such problem marriages, applies.

The Pauline Privilege also does not apply when a Christian has married a non-Christian. In those cases, a natural marriage exists and can be dissolved for a just cause, but by what is called the Petrine Privilege rather than by the Pauline Privilege. The Petrine Privilege is so-named because it is reserved to the Holy See, so only Rome can grant the Petrine Privilege (which it seldom does).

If there is schism in the Catholic church ( and there is and it'll only get worse ) then Bernard, it is a schismatic annulment. No way around it.
--hide--
You can say that things are really bad,but there is no Formal Schism yet,so your term doesn't apply.

04/09/2013 new
(Quote) Bernard-2709 said: You can say that things are really bad,but there is no Formal Schism yet,so your term doesn't apply.
(Quote) Bernard-2709 said:

You can say that things are really bad,but there is no Formal Schism yet,so your term doesn't apply.

--hide--


Even the changes to the responses in mass are just a small token of schismatic changes yet to come. Mark my words Bernard. You'll see.
04/09/2013 new

(Quote) Frank-410833 said: (Quote) Bernard-2709 said: You can say that things are really bad,but there is no...
(Quote) Frank-410833 said:
Quote:
Bernard-2709 said:

You can say that things are really bad,but there is no Formal Schism yet,so your term doesn't apply.




Even the changes to the responses in mass are just a small token of schismatic changes yet to come. Mark my words Bernard. You'll see.
--hide--
I believe that there may be a Schism in the Church too.I am just saying that it is not formal yet.You can't say that the annulments are schismatic per se.

04/09/2013 new

Good question. I wouldn't say that it was THE most important, but that it is one of the essentials. My spouse might not have to be in the same place spiritually as me, but she would have to believe everything the Church teaches and sincerely be trying to live it. There's a lot of latitude in there. I have children so I couldn't marry a lady whom my children needed to evangelize. I have only dated ladies that I considered devout since my wife passed away.

04/09/2013 new
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said: Hi Christine, From my experience while it is wonderful to share the same faith and practice tog...
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said:

Hi Christine,

From my experience while it is wonderful to share the same faith and practice together, we are rarely if ever at the same point along the way, so the journey itself is a series of hills and valleys, twists and turns. Sometimes pushing forward sometimes being pushed, sometimes veering off and veering back, getting separated and having to go back and find the other one, sometimes having to run to keep up. And, that is one of the best things about it and can be one of the worst things. My Pete had been raised with no faith at all, but one of the things that drew him to me was that I not only had a faith but appeared to follow it. We were married ten years when he began taking instruction and received into the Church. It definitely helps to be of the same faith when raising little ones. But, I think if we limit ourselves to those who are at the same point in the journey we may very well be missing one of the purposes of our lives, to be examples for our spouses and help them know God and the same for us.

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Totally agree. I know many people who are strong in their faith and their spouses are not catholic. Sometimes it is better to have mutual respect for each other than the same faith if it is in name primarily,
04/17/2013 new

I've gotten some great responses from people. biggrin The reason why I asked this question is because I have what is a friendship right now with a young man, also on CM, who was raised in a non-practicing family yet, like myself, has gone deeper into the study of the Faith and believes, as I do, all that is taught by the Catholic Church. We are not exactly in the same place on our spiritual journey, but it has been a process of conversion experiences that has us in a similar place in our walk with Christ. I'm hoping to be catechized into the Neo-Catechumenal Way; I have been going to his parish as often as I can, and have also joined him a few times for cantor practices. We are able to easily converse on a variety of subjects, both religious and secular. I had wondered if other people might have a similar opinion, as there are times when the spiritual journey shared by two marriage-minded people could be overlooked as a factor in compatibility (even though it's not the only factor to consider). I love hearing what others have to say about this subject.

May God's peace and the joy of the Resurrection be in your hearts now and always. Praying theheart rosary

04/17/2013 new

I don't think anyone's spiritual journey is identical or "in the same place" as someone else's. Even within the context of marriage, there will always be a difference between the spouses.

For me, I desire above all else a Catholic spouse in full agreement with the Magistrium. I don't care about the nonsense vain concepts of appearance or stupid empty materilaistic leanings, I care about is my future spouse a strong Catholic? He can be a poor grubby garbage collector who has a face that looks like he was beaten with a sack full of hammers covered in dog poo and I would still desire him as spouse if he was a man of God, a good solid Catholic.

Even in Catholicism we have been invaded by petty notions of beauty and materalism.

As for equality in the faith journey, with no arrogance, I've met very few men, if any, that come close to where I am with the Lord. Not to mention, I think there will seldom be equality of pace, as the man is supposed to be the spiritual head of the household. If he's doing his job right, living his vocation correctly, he will be slightly ahead.

I for one am not seeking some wishy washy cafeteria cathoic who views his walk with the Lord in some easy going, OSAS protestant context. I"m not here to be a missionary. But there are plenty of men and women out there who are ahead of me on the spiritual journey with God. I need one such man who can guide my spiritual shenangians as much as he will be involved with them.

Kinda like a school teacher, the teacher wont' be on the same level as a pack of 7 year olds at colouring-in-time but they can be involved in the process with guiding, suggesting and most importantly, the enjoyment that comes from it.

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