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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

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Apr 22 new

(Quote) Naomi-698107 said: That is quite strange, as I've heard the Church may never refuse communion on the basis that ...
(Quote) Naomi-698107 said:

That is quite strange, as I've heard the Church may never refuse communion on the basis that someone "may not" know they're recieving.

I used to work in an elder care hospital, populated with people who had terrible dementia, stroke related cognitive destruction and Alzheimers, teh Catholics were never denied Communion. In fact, the Priest himself came every Sunday after Mass to minister to these.

One woman I remember caring for appeared so far gone but as soon as the host was held before her, it was like something switched on inside her head. She'd even say "Amen", and this was a woman who never spoke any other time.

--hide--
It did sound strange, Naomi, and is possibly due to the philosphy of that particular priest. Most priests realize the benefits and graces that the Eucharist bestows upon its recipients, and are willing to see to it that the sacramental needs of their flocks are met. Chelle's mother has obviously spent years attending Mass, and the fact she is now disabled shouldn't be a reason for cutting her off from that which may sustain her spiritually.

Apr 22 new

(Quote) Chelle-924354 said: Thanks, Lauren and Ray! Thank you for your concern and suggestions. I am going to make a...
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said:



Thanks, Lauren and Ray! Thank you for your concern and suggestions. I am going to make a list and go from there.

Lauren, we have both a Catholic hospital and a large convent about five miles away. In fact, as a crow flies, I used to live about a block from both. I was thinking about that this morning. I'm so glad you mentioned it!

Ray, I had no idea that I could give my mom communion myself! Saturday evenings and Sunday mornings are difficult times to get coverage (caregivers) for her, and I can't leave her alone. However, I do have time during the week to swing by the church.

Thank you again for your replies! You all have given me plenty of avenues to pursue for success. Chelle

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Chelle, because of the practices of your mother's parish, you may have to receive an orientation that EME's receive, but it isn't that involved so as to take a lot of time.

Also, I'm sure you are aware that caring for a seriously ill person relieves you of the obligation to attend Sunday Mass. If possible, you can attend a Mass during the week or perform some other reverential act. I'm sure your extra time is minimal because of work and taking care of your mother.

Apr 22 new

(Quote) Chelle-924354 said: My mother has been a life-long devout Catholic. She's now at home, ill, and unable to attend...
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said:

My mother has been a life-long devout Catholic. She's now at home, ill, and unable to attend mass. While she was still a little bit more functional (she has Alzheimer's Disease), I called and asked that the church send a eucharistic minister on Sundays. I was told that if she did not know she was receiving communion, they may not give it to her - it was dependent upon the EM. In a way, that makes sense.

So, I asked if they could just bless her instead (similar to young children approaching the alter with their parents during communion or when one has not received the sacrament of penance). Again, I was told it would be up to the EM, but was given the impression that they would not want to waste their time with that. My solution has been to watch the mass on television on Sunday mornings - wish I had thought of that sooner!

I'm not even sure if I'm going to be able to get a priest to come to the house when my mom's time comes to pass over. However, through the cremation organization, I can get a deacon for around $100/$150 to preside over her service.

I don't understand the reasoning behind some of the above, and I was hoping that someone would be able to explain it to me. I don't expect the church to be at our disposal; it just seems so arbitrary, especially when I read on here how connected some CM members are to their churches and priests. Could it be because she lives in southern California?

--hide--

Talk to the Pastor. If he repeats this nonsense, write to the Bishop. If you don't get satisfaction there, write the Vatican.

With Pope Francis signifying and telling Priests and Bishops that their job is to serve, those that won't should be removed.

Apr 22 new
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said: My mother has been a life-long devout Catholic. She's now at home, ill, and unable to attend mass. While...
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said:

My mother has been a life-long devout Catholic. She's now at home, ill, and unable to attend mass. While she was still a little bit more functional (she has Alzheimer's Disease), I called and asked that the church send a eucharistic minister on Sundays. I was told that if she did not know she was receiving communion, they may not give it to her - it was dependent upon the EM. In a way, that makes sense.

So, I asked if they could just bless her instead (similar to young children approaching the alter with their parents during communion or when one has not received the sacrament of penance). Again, I was told it would be up to the EM, but was given the impression that they would not want to waste their time with that. My solution has been to watch the mass on television on Sunday mornings - wish I had thought of that sooner!

I'm not even sure if I'm going to be able to get a priest to come to the house when my mom's time comes to pass over. However, through the cremation organization, I can get a deacon for around $100/$150 to preside over her service.

I don't understand the reasoning behind some of the above, and I was hoping that someone would be able to explain it to me. I don't expect the church to be at our disposal; it just seems so arbitrary, especially when I read on here how connected some CM members are to their churches and priests. Could it be because she lives in southern California?

--hide--
Hi Chelle,

Whomever you spoke with is wrong. Catholics with mental/psychological disabilities or illnesses are not denied Communion. Children with developmental disabilities, autism, etc. make their First Holy Communion all the time. I suggest that you call the Office for Persons with Disabilities in your Diocese and request assistance in finding a Eucharistic Minister.
May 05 new

(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Hi Chelle, ... Children with developmental disabilities, autism, etc. make their First Holy Commu...
(Quote) Mary-486033 said: Hi Chelle,

... Children with developmental disabilities, autism, etc. make their First Holy Communion all the time. ...
--hide--

I thought they could only make their First Holy Communion once. smile

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