Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match!

info: Please Sign Up or Sign In to continue.

info: Please Sign Up or Sign In to continue.

A place to learn, mingle, and share

This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

Saint Peter's Square was created so that more people could be in the presence of the Pope and was named after Saint Peter, one of Jesus's apostles.
Learn More: Saint Peter

May 8th 2013 new

I think the question answers itself with this quote from the same article "In addition to living apart, Lofas, a clinical social worker who works with blended families, said the living arrangement is especially beneficial for second marriages." I plan on my first marriage being my only one, much like most Catholics here. The idea that people even think it's a remotely good idea to try this sort of marriage further lowers the bar, and I'm sure the divorce rates will continue to follow these couples as well.

These people are essentially living like a divorced couple, within a "marriage." I can't begin to think of the challenges or the multitude of issues that would arise when attempting to raise children in this manner. This link www.dailymail.co.uk is something in a similar area of terribleness. There's plenty of good reasons why married couples typically live in a household together with their families, and those who can over come the challenges that come with it through love and prayer, can conquer anything that comes their way.

May 8th 2013 new

(Quote) Emmanuel-940296 said: I think the question answers itself with this quote from the same article "In addition to...
(Quote) Emmanuel-940296 said:

I think the question answers itself with this quote from the same article "In addition to living apart, Lofas, a clinical social worker who works with blended families, said the living arrangement is especially beneficial for second marriages." I plan on my first marriage being my only one, much like most Catholics here. The idea that people even think it's a remotely good idea to try this sort of marriage further lowers the bar, and I'm sure the divorce rates will continue to follow these couples as well.

These people are essentially living like a divorced couple, within a "marriage." I can't begin to think of the challenges or the multitude of issues that would arise when attempting to raise children in this manner. This link www.dailymail.co.uk is something in a similar area of terribleness. There's plenty of good reasons why married couples typically live in a household together with their families, and those who can over come the challenges that come with it through love and prayer, can conquer anything that comes their way.

--hide--
Thanks for your thoughts on this issue. I hope that Mrs. Biderman's marriage does not go down in "Ashleys". scratchchin

May 9th 2013 new

No problem, I would hope no one's marriage goes down "Ashley's" either. I'm amazed something like that can exist, but with a decline in committed marriages, as shown by divorce rates and options like these being used and considered normal, that trend will continue.

May 9th 2013 new

I have known people for whom this works -- mostly of my generation. There is a reluctance to give up a home to which one's children have a sentimental attachment and a dread of packing and moving a lifetime's accumulation of memories. Women, perhaps more then men, do not relish the idea of living in a former spouse's house, decorated by her and filled with her memories. It is certainly not the ideal picture of a Catholic marriage, especially for couples of traditional marriage age, but it seems practical for older couples with grown children and estates to consider.

May 9th 2013 new

(Quote) Emmanuel-940296 said: No problem, I would hope no one's marriage goes down "Ashley's" either. I...
(Quote) Emmanuel-940296 said:

No problem, I would hope no one's marriage goes down "Ashley's" either. I'm amazed something like that can exist, but with a decline in committed marriages, as shown by divorce rates and options like these being used and considered normal, that trend will continue.

--hide--
Stranger things have happened in New York.

May 9th 2013 new

(Quote) Jean-968214 said: I have known people for whom this works -- mostly of my generation. There is a reluctance to give ...
(Quote) Jean-968214 said:

I have known people for whom this works -- mostly of my generation. There is a reluctance to give up a home to which one's children have a sentimental attachment and a dread of packing and moving a lifetime's accumulation of memories. Women, perhaps more then men, do not relish the idea of living in a former spouse's house, decorated by her and filled with her memories. It is certainly not the ideal picture of a Catholic marriage, especially for couples of traditional marriage age, but it seems practical for older couples with grown children and estates to consider.

--hide--
Thank you for expressing your take on this matter. Your description of how a woman might feel about living in a house full of reminders of her new husband's former spouse was revealing.

May 9th 2013 new
I'd say, "I'll let you pick my deodorant."
May 9th 2013 new

(Quote) Andrew-290721 said: I'd say, "I'll let you pick my deodorant."
(Quote) Andrew-290721 said: I'd say, "I'll let you pick my deodorant."
--hide--
It seems that you require things to pass the smell test.

May 9th 2013 new

Boy, if I did this, I might still have been married, not so much because we lived under different roofs, but because I would have been clueless about what was going on. He would have been able to have his cake and eat it too.

Posts 1 - 10 of 15