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This room is for supportive and informative discussion about divorce and/or the annulment process. All posters must have been previously divorced or annulled.

Saint Eugene De Mazenod is patron of dysfunctional families & Saint Fabiola obtained a divorce from her first husband prior to devoting her life to charitable works.
Learn More: Saint Eugene De Mazenod and Saint Fabiola

May 10th 2013 new

(Quote) Mary-943298 said: I want to make sure I understand this.....I am submitting for an anullment, if granted by the trib...
(Quote) Mary-943298 said:

I want to make sure I understand this.....I am submitting for an anullment, if granted by the tribunal, my ex-husband can appeal saying that he feels it should have not been granted?

--hide--
Yes.

May 10th 2013 new
(Quote) Mary-943298 said: I want to make sure I understand this.....I am submitting for an anullment, if granted by the tribunal, my ex-hu...
(Quote) Mary-943298 said:

I want to make sure I understand this.....I am submitting for an anullment, if granted by the tribunal, my ex-husband can appeal saying that he feels it should have not been granted?

--hide--


Dear Mary,

Once your annulment is granted you can remarry even if he did appeal.

"New-marriage is possible: After two Affirmative Decisions even if appealed to the Holy See "
Jul 21st 2013 new
If my marriage was civil and not convalidated by the Catholic Church, do I still need to secure an annulment in order to be able to marry in the Catholic Church?
Jul 21st 2013 new
Is that true Bernard? Her ex can challenge the finalized, affirmed annulment AFTER it's been finalized?
Jul 21st 2013 new
My understanding from my deacon is that I would need to go through the full process, based on my initial conversation with him. From what I am reading elsewhere, it would seem that my situation involves a lack of form and is therefore simpler to annul. I am dreading this process, however, I am anticipating the end result to be freeing emotionally and spiritually.
Jul 27th 2013 new
Hi Michele,

Thanks for your question. I'm in a similar predicament. Did Therese respond? If so, what did she say? I'm new to CM and am still getting familiar with fully navigating the site.

Peace,

Jose Luis
Jul 27th 2013 new
(quote) Michele-733455 said:

Therese,

Do you know what happens if I don't know where my X is? He owes so many people he got lost and thats been at least 12 years.
Thanks.


Sincerely,

Michele

My close friend did the annulment process without being able to locate her ex-husband -- the Tribunal works with what they have -- her marriage was declared null -- she had lots of witnesses and had been pregnant when they married and her ex was a known philanderer.
Jul 28th 2013 new
12 myths about marriage annulments in the Catholic Church
Source: tinyurl.com (Archdiocese of Baltimore)

MYTH NUMBER ONE:
A Divorced Person is Automatically Excommunicated from the Catholic Church
The truth is that divorce itself does not affect or alter a person's status in the Catholic Church. Divorce is
a function of the civil law and secular courts. Although it has been a widespread misconception for many
years, it is a myth that a divorced Catholic is "excommunicated," this is, not able to receive the
sacraments within the Church.
MYTH NUMBER TWO:
An Annulment Costs Thousands of Dollars
The truth is that no Tribunal anywhere in the world asks for "thousands of dollars," although the fee
requested for an annulment process does vary from one Tribunal to another. In the Archdiocese of
Baltimore, the requested fees range from one hundred dollars to five hundred dollars, depending on the type
of case, but the fee the Petitioner pays is only about one-half of the Tribunal's actual cost for a case. It is
a myth that the process costs thousands of dollars, and in fact no one is ever turned away from a
Tribunal because of their inability to pay a fee.
MYTH NUMBER THREE:
Only Catholic Marriages Need to be Annulled
The truth is that every marriage is considered a promise for life, a promise until death. It makes no
difference whether that promise was made in a Catholic ceremony or not. No one, no matter what their
religious affiliation or membership, is considered free to contract another marriage if they were married
previously. Every prior marriage must be investigated and annulled before a person can enter a new
marriage. It is a myth that no annulment is required if a person wasn't married in a Catholic ceremony.
MYTH NUMBER FOUR:
If an Annulment is Granted the Children will be Illegitimate
The truth is that an ecclesiastical annulment is concerned only with the spouses, and not the children. An
annulment has no effect at all on the legitimacy of children, or other arrangements regarding children, such
as custody or support. These are all concerns of the civil law, and an ecclesiastical annulment has
absolutely no effects under civil law. It is a myth that granting an annulment makes the children
illegitimate.Page 2 of 3
MYTH NUMBER FIVE:
It Takes Three to Five Years to Get an Annulment
The truth is that every annulment ease is different, and some processes are longer than others, but few
cases ever take more than 18 months from start to finish. Decades ago, it did take several years, but
today the longest process is usually finished in 9 to 18 months. Some types of cases can be finished in a
month or even less. It is a myth that the typical marriage annulment takes three years or more to
complete.
MYTH NUMBER SIX:
Anyone who Applies (and Waits Long Enough) Will Get an Annulment
The truth is that Tribunals do give negative decisions. The burden of proving a case rests on the Petitioner,
that is, the person who applies for an annulment. The Catholic Church presumes that every marriage is a
valid union, and there must be sufficient grounds for declaring otherwise. The Tribunal will help the
Petitioner to understand what's needed to develop a case, but if there isn't enough proof, the Tribunal will
give a negative decision. It is a myth that everyone who applies gets an annulment.
MYTH NUMBER SEVEN:
If Children were Born in the Marriage, It Can't be Annulled
The truth is that the Catholic Church considers an openness to children to be a natural and essential part of
sacramental marriage, but whether any children were actually born or not has no bearing on the possibility
of an annulment. If children were born, it is important that both parents live up to their natural and legal
obligations to their children. It is a myth, however, that a marriage can't be annulled if the marriage
resulted in children.
MYTH NUMBER EIGHT:
The Ex-Spouse Has to Agree to an Annulment Or It Can't Be Granted
The truth is that both spouses have equal rights in an annulment proceeding, but that doesn't mean that the
Respondentthe ex-spouse of the person who starts the annulment processhas to agree to an
annulment. The truth is that the Tribunal judges can grant an annulment even if the ex-spouse is adamantly
opposed to the idea of an annulment. It is a myth that both spouses have to agree to an annulment.Page 3 of 3
MYTH NUMBER NINE:
An Annulment is Just "Catholic Divorce"
The truth is that civil divorce and a church annulment are two vastly different things. A divorce is
concerned with the legal realities of marriage only; an annulment is concerned with the religious and
spiritual elementthe sacrament of marriage. A divorce focuses on the end of a marriage; an annulment
looks at the beginning, the very moment the couple said "I do." A divorce looks at marriage in civil law;
an annulment looks at marriage from the perspective of the Gospel and of Church doctrine. It is a myth
that an annulment is "Divorce, Catholic style."
MYTH NUMBER TEN:
An Annulment Means The Marriage Never Took Place
The truth is that an annulment can't erase history, and doesn't try to. An annulment in the Catholic
Church deals only with the sacrament of marriage, and not the legal, historical, emotional truth of
marriage. An annulment states that the sacrament was never present in the marriage, and not that the
marriage never took place. It is a myth that an annulment means that the marriage never happened.
MYTH NUMBER ELEVEN:
The Tribunal is Like a Courtroom, With Judges, Witnesses, lawyers, & Cross-Examinations
The truth is that the Tribunal is a Court of Law for the Church, but it is very different from a civil
courtroom. Depending on the type of case, the spouses may have Advocates, and there will be 1 to 3 judges,
but most of the work is done in writing, and there is never an emotional courtroom scene as in television
dramas. If a person appears in person to offer testimony, it is usually done in a private interview, and
never with "cross-examination!" It is a myth that the Tribunal is like a TV courtroom.
MYTH NUMBER TWELVE:
The Idea of An Annulment Is Pure Legalism in the Catholic Church
The truth is that an annulment is "packaged" in a legal environment, since that is the best way to protect
the rights and interests of everyone involved, but it is far more than a "legalistic process." People who've
gone through an annulment have found peace and insight into themselves and their marriages. It is a myth
that the only concern of the Church in an annulment is legalism, but through the Tribunal process the
Church invites you to find healing, forgiveness, and new joy.

Jul 30th 2013 new
Dear Merilyne,

To the best of my knowledge, the catholic church considers civil marriages as invalid.The tribunal would have to verify the invalidity of that marriage. This process would be an easy and a brief one.

TKC
rose

Therese

Jul 30th 2013 new
(quote) Thomas-984554 said: 12 myths about marriage annulments in the Catholic ChurchMYTH NUMBER ONE:A Divorced Person is Automatically Excommunicated from the Catholic ChurchThe truth is that divorce itself does not affect or alter a person's status in the Catholic Church. Divorce is a function of the civil law and secular courts. Although it has been a widespread misconception for many years, it is a myth that a divorced Catholic is "excommunicated," this is, not able to receive the sacraments within the Church.MYTH NUMBER TWO:An Annulment Costs Thousands of DollarsThe truth is that no Tribunal anywhere in the world asks for "thousands of dollars," although the fee requested for an annulment process does vary from one Tribunal to another. In the Archdiocese of Baltimore, the requested fees range from one hundred dollars to five hundred dollars, depending on the type of case, but the fee the Petitioner pays is only about one-half of the Tribunal's actual cost for a case. It is a myth that the process costs thousands of dollars, and in fact no one is ever turned away from a Tribunal because of their inability to pay a fee.MYTH NUMBER THREE:Only Catholic Marriages Need to be AnnulledThe truth is that every marriage is considered a promise for life, a promise until death. It makes no difference whether that promise was made in a Catholic ceremony or not. No one, no matter what their religious affiliation or membership, is considered free to contract another marriage if they were married previously. Every prior marriage must be investigated and annulled before a person can enter a new marriage. It is a myth that no annulment is required if a person wasn't married in a Catholic ceremony.MYTH NUMBER FOUR:If an Annulment is Granted the Children will be IllegitimateThe truth is that an ecclesiastical annulment is concerned only with the spouses, and not the children. An annulment has no effect at all on the legitimacy of children, or other arrangements regarding children, such as custody or support. These are all concerns of the civil law, and an ecclesiastical annulment has absolutely no effects under civil law. It is a myth that granting an annulment makes the children illegitimate.Page 2 of 3MYTH NUMBER FIVE:It Takes Three to Five Years to Get an AnnulmentThe truth is that every annulment ease is different, and some processes are longer than others, but few cases ever take more than 18 months from start to finish. Decades ago, it did take several years, but today the longest process is usually finished in 9 to 18 months. Some types of cases can be finished in a month or even less. It is a myth that the typical marriage annulment takes three years or more to complete.MYTH NUMBER SIX:Anyone who Applies (and Waits Long Enough) Will Get an AnnulmentThe truth is that Tribunals do give negative decisions. The burden of proving a case rests on the Petitioner, that is, the person who applies for an annulment. The Catholic Church presumes that every marriage is a valid union, and there must be sufficient grounds for declaring otherwise. The Tribunal will help the Petitioner to understand what's needed to develop a case, but if there isn't enough proof, the Tribunal will give a negative decision. It is a myth that everyone who applies gets an annulment.MYTH NUMBER SEVEN:If Children were Born in the Marriage, It Can't be AnnulledThe truth is that the Catholic Church considers an openness to children to be a natural and essential part of sacramental marriage, but whether any children were actually born or not has no bearing on the possibility of an annulment. If children were born, it is important that both parents live up to their natural and legal obligations to their children. It is a myth, however, that a marriage can't be annulled if the marriage resulted in children.MYTH NUMBER EIGHT:The Ex-Spouse Has to Agree to an Annulment Or It Can't Be GrantedThe truth is that both spouses have equal rights in an annulment proceeding, but that doesn't mean that the Respondentthe ex-spouse of the person who starts the annulment processhas to agree to an annulment. The truth is that the Tribunal judges can grant an annulment even if the ex-spouse is adamantly opposed to the idea of an annulment. It is a myth that both spouses have to agree to an annulment.Page 3 of 3MYTH NUMBER NINE:An Annulment is Just "Catholic Divorce"The truth is that civil divorce and a church annulment are two vastly different things. A divorce is concerned with the legal realities of marriage only; an annulment is concerned with the religious and spiritual elementthe sacrament of marriage. A divorce focuses on the end of a marriage; an annulment looks at the beginning, the very moment the couple said "I do." A divorce looks at marriage in civil law; an annulment looks at marriage from the perspective of the Gospel and of Church doctrine. It is a myth that an annulment is "Divorce, Catholic style."MYTH NUMBER TEN:An Annulment Means The Marriage Never Took PlaceThe truth is that an annulment can't erase history, and doesn't try to. An annulment in the Catholic Church deals only with the sacrament of marriage, and not the legal, historical, emotional truth of marriage. An annulment states that the sacrament was never present in the marriage, and not that the marriage never took place. It is a myth that an annulment means that the marriage never happened.MYTH NUMBER ELEVEN:The Tribunal is Like a Courtroom, With Judges, Witnesses, lawyers, & Cross-ExaminationsThe truth is that the Tribunal is a Court of Law for the Church, but it is very different from a civil courtroom. Depending on the type of case, the spouses may have Advocates, and there will be 1 to 3 judges, but most of the work is done in writing, and there is never an emotional courtroom scene as in television dramas. If a person appears in person to offer testimony, it is usually done in a private interview, and never with "cross-examination!" It is a myth that the Tribunal is like a TV courtroom.MYTH NUMBER TWELVE:The Idea of An Annulment Is Pure Legalism in the Catholic ChurchThe truth is that an annulment is "packaged" in a legal environment, since that is the best way to protect the rights and interests of everyone involved, but it is far more than a "legalistic process." People who've gone through an annulment have found peace and insight into themselves and their marriages. It is a myth that the only concern of the Church in an annulment is legalism, but through the Tribunal process the Church invites you to find healing, forgiveness, and new joy.
Thank you Thomas for your contribution! Good information!
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