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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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May 09 new

(Quote) Steven-706921 said: Maybe, but that simply means that neither Israel or the U.S. have a real dog in this fi...
(Quote) Steven-706921 said:

Maybe, but that simply means that neither Israel or the U.S. have a real dog in this fight, though we sure act as if we do.

Here's a crazy idea! Let's stay out of other people's wars for a change!

--hide--

I wish I could agree with you that we don't have a real dog in this fight, but given the amount of aid that Syria gives to terrorist groups and the amount of grief terrorists groups give us, we do have a stake in this fight. Perhaps not a massive stake in the fight, but a stake nonetheless.

Israel has a massive dog in this fight as Syria spends all kinds of time and effort helping Hezbullah attack them.

May 09 new

(Quote) Steven-706921 said: Maybe, but that simply means that neither Israel or the U.S. have a real dog in this fi...
(Quote) Steven-706921 said:

Maybe, but that simply means that neither Israel or the U.S. have a real dog in this fight, though we sure act as if we do.

Here's a crazy idea! Let's stay out of other people's wars for a change!

--hide--



Syria's a prelude to WW III: wreck Syria, pull in Iran and China and Russia follow. The US and Israel aren't acting in their own interests.

May 09 new

(Quote) John-336509 said: I think Peter's point is that under Ottoman rule the Middle East was a less turbulent...
(Quote) John-336509 said:

I think Peter's point is that under Ottoman rule the Middle East was a less turbulent place than it is today.

--hide--
Thanks John, I don't always express my opinions clearly.

May 09 new
John, wih all due respect, are you seriously suggesting that having a Sunni-extremist lead, Al Qeada satellite state neighboring Israel is an improvement to an Iranian proxy army as a De facto buffer zone on their Norhern flank? If you do, I humbly submit that you are seriously misinformed about the composition of a "free" Syria and the composition of the present Libyan government (which, BTW, is a leading funder and supplier of arms and me. To the Syrian rebellion).
May 10 new

(Quote) Steven-706921 said: John, wih all due respect, are you seriously suggesting that having a Sunni-extremist lead, Al Qeada sa...
(Quote) Steven-706921 said: John, wih all due respect, are you seriously suggesting that having a Sunni-extremist lead, Al Qeada satellite state neighboring Israel is an improvement to an Iranian proxy army as a De facto buffer zone on their Norhern flank? If you do, I humbly submit that you are seriously misinformed about the composition of a "free" Syria and the composition of the present Libyan government (which, BTW, is a leading funder and supplier of arms and me. To the Syrian rebellion).
--hide--

No, but I'm seriously suggesting that anybody who claims to have knowledge that the current rebellion is absolutely going to lead to an extremist al-Queda satellite state needs to stop believing what they read in their fortune cookies, horoscopes, palm readers, or wherever else they claim to get their vision of the future.

It is an undisputable fact that the current government of Syria has materially contributed to the problems in the Middle East. If the selection of a replacement was a totally random event, the odds would be very high that the replacement would be much better than the current incumbent.

But the replacement is not a totally random event. There are any number of parties trying to control that event. This leads us to the self-contradiction of your position.

You seem to live in absolute fear that any government that meets with popular approval in the Middle East will inevitably be an al-Queda surrogate. But at the exact same time you live in absolute opposition of U.S. involvement in these conflicts.

Here's the reality: the folks in the Middle East don't like living under muderous dictatorships. Consequently, they are going to rebel against them when they get a chance. I don't know why this is so hard for people to understand.

At this point you have to make a choice: you either get heavily involved and get some control over the outcome or you let the rebels and whoever aids them do whatever they want and and quit whinning and crying about how extremists are going to take over. If you can't be bothered to help the rebels out, you get no right to cry when people you don't like take charge.

May 10 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: it was not clear that the reason why Israel attacked Syria was because of an arms transfer by...
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:

it was not clear that the reason why Israel attacked Syria was because of an arms transfer by Syria to
Lebanon.

--hide--



www.iris.org.il

Now, imagine this map with weapons having more range, and possibly armed with chem/bio agents.

Make no mistake. The gloves are coming off. Regardless of US support. When you are backed into a corner with nothing to lose you fight with everything you have left. FWIW, this map also explains why the West Bank isn't going away from Israeli control any time soon.

May 10 new

(Quote) ed-925050 said: www.iris.org.il imagine this map with weapons having mor...
(Quote) ed-925050 said:




www.iris.org.il

Now, imagine this map with weapons having more range, and possibly armed with chem/bio agents.

Make no mistake. The gloves are coming off. Regardless of US support. When you are backed into a corner with nothing to lose you fight with everything you have left. FWIW, this map also explains why the West Bank isn't going away from Israeli control any time soon.

--hide--


Ed, that is scarey for Isreal. They are pretty vigilant though.

May 17 new
(quote) Marianne-100218 said:

Ed, that is scarey for Isreal. They are pretty vigilant though.
There's another reason for Israel to be vigilant, and it's a big part of what explains the rebellion in Syria. The primary fundraiser for the rebellion, it turns out, is Qatar which wants access, through a Muslim Brotherhood (another terrorist group, BTW) puppet state, to the Natural Gas deposits there, as well as a access to a pipeline in Europe for their LNG (liquified natural gas).

Their big competitor is Saudi Arabia, which has funded an Al-Qaeda based rebel group in Syria so they can control the name to their liking. You can also add Russia, which up to now has been the chief supplier of Natural Gas to Europe.

And, of course, you have the U.S. funneling arms into Syria. This is a policy that, as is now being noted through EWTN news outlet Catholic World Report, is making Christians in the Middle East hard pressed and oppressed indeed.

www.zerohedge.com

www.catholicworldreport.com.


May 18 new
(quote) John-336509 said:

I think Peter's point is that under Ottoman rule the Middle East was a less turbulent place than it is today.

Less turbulent perhaps but not less brutal than current regiemes. in Turkey today it is against the law to admit the Armenian genocide of the early 1900s.
May 18 new
(quote) John-336509 said: No, but I'm seriously suggesting that anybody who claims to have knowledge that the current rebellion is absolutely going to lead to an extremist al-Queda satellite state needs to stop believing what they read in their fortune cookies, horoscopes, palm readers, or wherever else they claim to get their vision of the future. It is an undisputable fact that the current government of Syria has materially contributed to the problems in the Middle East. If the selection of a replacement was a totally random event, the odds would be very high that the replacement would be much better than the current incumbent. But the replacement is not a totally random event. There are any number of parties trying to control that event. This leads us to the self-contradiction of your position. You seem to live in absolute fear that any government that meets with popular approval in the Middle East will inevitably be an al-Queda surrogate. But at the exact same time you live in absolute opposition of U.S. involvement in these conflicts. Here's the reality: the folks in the Middle East don't like living under muderous dictatorships. Consequently, they are going to rebel against them when they get a chance. I don't know why this is so hard for people to understand. At this point you have to make a choice: you either get heavily involved and get some control over the outcome or you let the rebels and whoever aids them do whatever they want and and quit whinning and crying about how extremists are going to take over. If you can't be bothered to help the rebels out, you get no right to cry when people you don't like take charge.
No, John, I'm not reading tea leaves, fortune cookies, or horoscopes to say any of this. Not only are those against the Catholic faith (CCC 2115-2117, www.vatican.va ), but we need only look at who supports the rebels, what they want, and what has occurred in places where the "Arab Spring" has succeeded in the past.

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