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Gardening Advice

May 20 new
OK, my son-in-law tilled the garden and spread 6-24-24. I put down 1/3 of the weed barrier (no time for weeds!) and have some of my peppers, tomatoes, radishes, carrots and spinach planted. My truck is filled with more veggie plants and seeds...zucchini, cucumbers, onions, watermelon,etc.

Although we've had a garden for years, my late husband grew up on a farm and did all the 'hard' work. I just did the 'fun' stuf...yes, gardening IS fun!

I want it to be a success and I've no one to ask now. Advice is welcome!!!

1. Seed potatoes: eyes up or down? Do I quarter them, or cut up each piece with an eye? How deep are they planted?

2. How close do I plant the green bean and corn seeds? I'm using Slenderette and Ambrosia.

3. Do I have to mound the dirt for anything? What? When?

I live in the Midwest, so I'd appreciate some friendly tips from my fellow gardeners in this climate.

HAPPY GARDENING!



May 21 new
I'm mostly a flower gardener but lately have been giving some veggies a try.

Potatoes- I like to have a few eyes on them and try to keep them eyes up. As for how deep, I'm not sure. I think I planted mine too deep because they took FOREVER to come up! I planted them twice as deep as they were big.

Are you sending the beans up the corn? I would think about 3 inches away. Corn plant roots don't go too far from the stalk.

Mounding- I have no mounds. I have my veggies mixed into my flowerbeds. So far so good except for those darn tatoers. They haven't bloomed yet and I think it's getting too hot for them now. irked

Happy Gardening! gardener
May 21 new
Thank you for the tips, Sandra!
May 22 new
(quote) Tracy-929496 said: 2. How close do I plant the green bean and corn seeds? I'm using Slenderette and Ambrosia.
If you bought the seeds in packets, there should be instructions as to plant and row spacing. I usually follow the plant spacing recommendations but make my rows closer together, especially if I'm planting a small area of corn to make sure the ears get pollinated. My rule of thumb for row spacing is to make sure I have enough room to access the plants for weeding, watering, and harvesting.

The only seeds I buy loose are beets, and I like to plant those randomly because I usually forget what the recommended spacing is supposed to be. laughing
May 23 new
Thanks, Margaret!
May 23 new
I used to garden in your climate. The rules for what you are planting are the same as down here, except your last frost dates are later.

Potatoes - cut enough for one per eye. Set the piece aside for a few hours or a day so that the cut side dries out to create a "seal" over the cut side(s). Plant eye up 18" apart if you have the space to do it (I plant mine about 10-12" apart). Plant 4-6" deep. As they grow, you will want more soil on hand to keep building up a small hill around the plant (called "hilling"). You also may use straw in place of soil and straw up to 10" to 1' deep. You want to trap the moisture for the potato. After the vine dies, the potatoes are ready for harvest.

Green bean and corn seeds: green bush (not vine) beans at 9 per square foot and corn at 1 per square foot. Corn is deep root and beans are shallow root, so no harm there.

Mounds for squash assist in growing the seeds into seedlings. They help trap the moisture which squash, as a high moisture-liking plant, prefers. I used to mound for tomato plants but think it was a habit passed down over the years.
May 23 new
Wow, John. Your post was really helpful, especially the part about cutting the potatoes first. It makes sense. Yes, I do have room for the correct spacing and plenty of dirt for mounding.

Now, how about Canada Red rhubarb? I have the last three beautiful plants I saved from my Garden Center (interad of selling them!) and want them to be successful. I know I can't harvest the stems the first year. Any other tips?

I LOVE rhubarb!
May 24 new
(quote) Tracy-929496 said: Now, how about Canada Red rhubarb? I have the last three beautiful plants I saved from my Garden Center (interad of selling them!) and want them to be successful. I know I can't harvest the stems the first year. Any other tips? 


I love rhubarb too. My mother mulched the new plantings of rhubarb very well. They like compost. Older plantings like lots of water as well. When the rhubarb has put out its last tender stems, it will send out stems and seeds - odd looking stem that goes straight up in the air - cut it off. It won't do a lot of harm to have it on there, but it doesn't help the plant. It sucks the nutrients up into the seed pods and doesn't put the nutrients back into the root system. You want a strong root system. that's my only rhubarb advice.



May 24 new
I found Kate's reply VERY helpful and informative! Compost works? Wow. You learn something new every day. Thank you for sharing that, Kate. .. My only two cents of advice is that when I lived in the northern Midwest, rhubarb needed a lot of sun. When I moved South and planted rhubarb, too much sun killed the plants. I have learned that in the South, about 4-6 hours of sun is enough. In the northern Midwest states, the plants as I recall needed 6-8 hours per day. Keep in mind, the Southern sun gets hotter as the day draws longer. I plant my rhubarb here on the east side of the house as a border plant, and am having good results with it. Soil preparation, of course, makes a huge difference as does regular watering.
May 24 new
Thanks Kate and John. I hope to plant my three rhubarb plants tomorrow!
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