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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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Jun 27th 2013 new
(quote) Wendy-387654 said: Thanks for answering me Elizabeth.

So if I get this straight, our secular media has decided that the BIG and TOP news right now is about a woman who, YEARS ago, used a racial slur towards a man who held a gun to her head?

Wow, no wonder so many of us don't know about so many (really important) things happening in our country these days (the trial of the abortion doctor, Obama's slam against Catholic schools, no media coverage for the March for Life, the 61 cases and over 200 plaintiffs against the unconstitutional HHS mandate, I could go on and on)

Now I remember why I don't have cable/regular t.v. and instead choose to listen to worthy news via Christian stations on my radio and look things up via the internet. Or...when I read about them via our CM community.
Remember when all the news media had its main focus on that ridiculous Paris Hilton and her being sentenced to jail. No matter what channel you turned to her face kept popping up on the screen with more news updates about the spoiled rotten brat giving her so much publicity than she deserved for doing something stupid like not showing up for a scheduled court hearing. You could switch channels as much as you wanted to get away from it, but Hilton's swirky face kept popping up on the screen. When it came up on the local news a young girl, who had just turned 18 at that time, was abducted upon leaving a shopping mall in Indiana, guess whose face came popping up on the screen to "intterupt this show for more important updates on Paris Hilton"". None other than Miss Paris Hilton's. I cannot help but wonder if that same girl who would be 23 years today and alive, if the local news media had focused its attention on her and not on Paris Hilton. Instead I find out about her untimely death through a prayer thread on CM before I got it from the local news.

Paula Deen is a big multi-talented celebrity and her brother Bubba Hiers was just walking in her shadow, so why would the news media focus its attention on the less popular figure when Paula is the bigger fish. There again it's all about marketing. And his business is booming now. It was his poor workplace ethics that is at the root of Paula's circumstances, and his business wasn't hurt by it. Read about it on this link. www.tmz.com

Chef Aaron McCargo Jr, the chef who won Season 4 of "The Next Food Network Star" very recently spoke highly of Paula Deen. In a statement recently released on his Facebook page he wrote "Paula has always been very helpful and supportive throughout my career, and as her friend I'm saddened to see that she is going through a tough time right now."

Read more: www.tmz.com
Visit Fishwrapper: http://www.fishwrapper.com
Black 'Next Food Network Star'
Give Paula a Break
'We Are All Human'







Jun 28th 2013 new
(quote) Elizabeth-114955 said: A very long time ago when she had a gun held to her face in a bank robbery and when she worked as a bank teller at the bank that was being robbed. Have you ever had a gun held to your face. I have and it ticked me off. That all I am going to say about that incident, other than the person who pulled the gun on me wasn't black. I find it very interesting that someone just had to ask her if she ever used the n-word. Vveery interesting
Wow, Elizabeth--having a gun held to your face should have done more than
tick you off. I would have been scared to death, to the point of shaking.

Why would a story from so long ago even be brought up? And I bet Paula
baby used a lot of other words during that incident that were a lot worse than
the N word.

This is all a bunch of media crap.
Jun 28th 2013 new
(quote) Marianne-100218 said: Wow, Elizabeth--having a gun held to your face should have done more than
tick you off. I would have been scared to death, to the point of shaking.

Why would a story from so long ago even be brought up? And I bet Paula
baby used a lot of other words during that incident that were a lot worse than
the N word.

This is all a bunch of media crap.
Sure it is a bunch of crap, and if I didn't know any better there is something really dirty behind I said in an earlier post on this thread I find it very interesting that somebody had to ask her if she ever used the N-word.
Jun 29th 2013 new
Marianne,

Internment of Japanese-Americans largely took place in the western United States, for those living in the coastal states of CA, WA, OR and AZ.

Some info about the internment:
en.wikipedia.org

Photos from google images:
www.google.com

In addition to being confined in camps, estimates that I have seen approximate that these Americans lost about $400 million in property. They were only allowed to take to the camps what that could carry on their backs. Everything else had to be left in trust to a non-interred friend, business associate or put in some sort of government storage. Many had to sell their businesses, farms, automobiles, animals and other personal property with only a few days notice. These were often sold at incredible losses. There were great problems with thefts of property left unattended, losses of crops because there was no one to harvest them and theft from government storage, loss of government tax payment records and many other bad things.

Imagine if you had to sell all that you have, within a week, for whatever price you could fetch for it. Compounding this, all of your neighbors would no that you only had a week to sell all of your things, or you would have to walk away from it forever. The longer you wait, the lower the price you would receive. The losses were great.

I imagine that you would find practically every single Japanese-American living in the western U.S. would say that this internment was a very, very big deal. I affected them greatly during WWII and still impacts them to this day... if nothing else than because of the great loss of wealth in their families to the present day. I think that the argument that it "probably kept them safe at the very least" is a very poor justification for what happened to them. This should not happen in the U.S.

Just my thoughts.

Ed
Jun 29th 2013 new
(quote) ED-20630 said: Marianne,

Internment of Japanese-Americans largely took place in the western United States, for those living in the coastal states of CA, WA, OR and AZ.

Some info about the internment:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_American_internment

Photos from google images:
https://www.google.com/search?q=japanese+internment+camps&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=8HPOUaeJINTh0AHyuoCYBQ&sqi=2&ved=0CDkQsAQ&biw=1097&bih=545#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=kgbG8qTEkMxh_M%3A%3BTXj8frFP64HqyM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.tofugu.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2008%252F07%252Fhawaii_honolulu_internment_camp2.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.tofugu.com%252F2008%252F07%252F28%252Fwhy-japanese-in-hawaii-werent-interned-durin-wwii%252F%3B400%3B317

In addition to being confined in camps, estimates that I have seen approximate that these Americans lost about $400 million in property. They were only allowed to take to the camps what that could carry on their backs. Everything else had to be left in trust to a non-interred friend, business associate or put in some sort of government storage. Many had to sell their businesses, farms, automobiles, animals and other personal property with only a few days notice. These were often sold at incredible losses. There were great problems with thefts of property left unattended, losses of crops because there was no one to harvest them and theft from government storage, loss of government tax payment records and many other bad things.

Imagine if you had to sell all that you have, within a week, for whatever price you could fetch for it. Compounding this, all of your neighbors would no that you only had a week to sell all of your things, or you would have to walk away from it forever. The longer you wait, the lower the price you would receive. The losses were great.

I imagine that you would find practically every single Japanese-American living in the western U.S. would say that this internment was a very, very big deal. I affected them greatly during WWII and still impacts them to this day... if nothing else than because of the great loss of wealth in their families to the present day. I think that the argument that it "probably kept them safe at the very least" is a very poor justification for what happened to them. This should not happen in the U.S.

Just my thoughts.

Ed
The reason I think that the constant mention of what happened to the Japanese
during WW2 is overstated is because other groups were interred also, but no
mention of them is ever heard.

I only know about them from people living in this area who told me that they
used to go and bring food and packages to the people interred, even though
they did not know them. They were Italians, whose country we were at war
with.

en.wikipedia.org
Jun 29th 2013 new
Great Topic Elizabeth. Lots of very interesting replies. I think that it is necessary for each human being to strive for a better world and strive to improve our attitude toward our fellow man or woman, whomever they may be. That said- I have experienced discrimination repeatedly as a white woman in many situations where I now live. It does go both ways. I HAVE BEEN HURT. ......................................................................................................BUT I try and try and RISE above how I have been treated. I have hurts that I carry from my experiences but I separate from those- look the hurts square in the eye- acknowledge the IGNORANCE of these PEOPLE and move on. So I continually work on this area because here we are ALL- NEEDING SELF improvement and growth as human beings. .............................................................HOWEVER-THERE IS NO EXCUSE though for Paula Deen to not review her attitudes and seek improvement. If she is making good money-and we know she is- if she has become famous- if she has been able to influence other people- and we know she has- she should also work on other types of self improvement and her personal and professional presentation, persona and attitude for the good of all around her.SHE NEEDS TO MAKE HERSELF WORTHY OF THE SPOTLIGHT. When one is thrust into the spotlight, one has to do some INNER work and INNER SOUL SEARCHING to make sure one promotes sound values IMHO. RESPECT for one's fellow man is A BEDROCK OF GOOD VALUES AND IS something everyone can grow in- no matter what we experience and no matter how we have been hurt.
Jun 29th 2013 new
(quote) Marianne-100218 said: The reason I think that the constant mention of what happened to the Japanese
during WW2 is overstated is because other groups were interred also, but no
mention of them is ever heard.

I only know about them from people living in this area who told me that they
used to go and bring food and packages to the people interred, even though
they did not know them. They were Italians, whose country we were at war
with.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian-American_internment
No one talks about POLISH or UKRAINIANS and many other SLAVIC and Jewish people groups who have endured mass starvation and hardships. No one talks about the Jews who were put on Progroms and systematically discriminated against in Eastern European Countries as well as Germany. There was systematic starvation done to many groups especially to the Ukrainians and no one mentions it. What happened to the Japenese and these internment camps would or should break anyones heart when one actually looks into it and reads about it. ...............What atrocities have been committed against any people group should not be unnoticed and should be talked about. There is a book I picked up where a young woman tells her story about being sent to an internment camp. more later....
Jun 29th 2013 new
Concerning the Italians.... The Wikipedia source that you cited explains quite thoroughly the difference between the treatment of those of Italian and Japanese desent... it this way:

All of the interred Italians were in fact not U.S. citizens at the time that war broke out. By contrast, approximately 60% of Japanese were U.S. citizens. The remaining 40% were residents, visiting foreign students, diplomats, foreign sailors and Japanese in the process of becoming (but not yet) citizens. If someone were in fact a Japanse citizen, Italian citizen, German citizen (and perhaps others) in the U.S. at the time that war broke out, it seems quite resonable to me to either deport them immediately or inter them (except perhaps for those already seeking citizenship). 60% of the those of Japanese decent were in fact just as much of a U.S. citizen and you or me.

I am German on both sides of my family, but 6th or 7th generation U.S. citizen (having arrived in the U.S. about 1855. Below is some information that I found about internment of those of German decent during WWII. Apparently about 11,000 were interred, a small number of them were U.S. citizens. By contast, approximately 110,000 Japanese (and 60% U.S. citizens) were interred. Apparently because of the very large population of German-Americans in the U.S. at that time, the situation (for them) was handled quite differently (apparently on a very limited, case-by-case basis). I imagine that there were many millions of German-American U.S. citizens at that time.

Ed

---------------------------
From your source:
"Italian American internment refers to the internmentof non-citizen Italians in the United States during World War II. Unlike the Japanese Americans who were interned during the war, they have never received reparations.[1] However, unlike Japanese-Americans, who were rounded up whether citizens or not, only non-citizen Italians were rounded up.[2] In 2010, the California Legislature passed a resolution apologizing for the mistreatment of Italian residents.[3]"

"Indeed, both foreign-born and native-born Japanese Americans and both citizens and non-citizens were interned, though the majority (about 60 percent) were in fact native-born U.S. citizens.[9][10][11]Italian Americans interned under the War Relocation Authority were not arrested under the Enemy Alien Act, but were simply "persons" removed under the War Relocation Authority."

en.wikipedia.org
------------------------------------

German internment during WWII
"At the start of World War II, under the authority of the Alien Enemies Act of 1798, the United States government detained and interned over 11,000 German enemy aliens, as well as a small number of German-American citizens, either naturalized or native-born. Their ranks included immigrants to the U.S. as well as visitors stranded in the U.S. by hostilities. In many cases, the families of the internees were allowed to remain together at internment camps in the U.S. In other cases, families were separated. Limited due process was allowed for those arrested and detained."

"The population of German citizens in the United States not to mention American citizens of German birth was far too large for a general policy of internment comparable to that used in the case of the Japanese in America.[23] Instead, German citizens were detained and evicted from coastal areas on an individual basis. The War Department considered mass expulsions from coastal areas for reasons of military security, but never executed such plans.[24]"

en.wikipedia.org

------------------------------------------------

Jun 29th 2013 new
I just read this thread... I have heard some grumblings but I'm not well informed about Paula Dean's situation as there are so many more relevant issues going on in our world today.
here is my 2 cents ....
1. If she said this more than 20 years why all this fuss? It is true, many people were raised in ignorance but once you reach adulthood you own your actions. We should put things in perspective. Why is she basically being crucified for something she said 20+ years ago? This was not said 1 day ago, 1 week ago or even 1 year ago. I'm sad for her and wish her well. Is the media giving the people a "new toy"...focusing them elsewhere so that they do not ponder the IRS mess and ALL the other messes we are facing,
2. Since the lawsuit that started it all involved her brother (though she did not discipline him) why would anyone ask her the question except for sensationalism? It is really unfortunate that she made a "public confession". It reminds me of Judas returning to the high priests and his "public confession"..."I've betrayed innocent blood..."recall how well that went.
Jun 29th 2013 new
(quote) ED-20630 said: Concerning the Italians.... The Wikipedia source that you cited explains quite thoroughly the difference between the treatment of those of Italian and Japanese desent... it this way:

All of the interred Italians were in fact not U.S. citizens at the time that war broke out. By contrast, approximately 60% of Japanese were U.S. citizens. The remaining 40% were residents, visiting foreign students, diplomats, foreign sailors and Japanese in the process of becoming (but not yet) citizens. If someone were in fact a Japanse citizen, Italian citizen, German citizen (and perhaps others) in the U.S. at the time that war broke out, it seems quite resonable to me to either deport them immediately or inter them (except perhaps for those already seeking citizenship). 60% of the those of Japanese decent were in fact just as much of a U.S. citizen and you or me.

I am German on both sides of my family, but 6th or 7th generation U.S. citizen (having arrived in the U.S. about 1855. Below is some information that I found about internment of those of German decent during WWII. Apparently about 11,000 were interred, a small number of them were U.S. citizens. By contast, approximately 110,000 Japanese (and 60% U.S. citizens) were interred. Apparently because of the very large population of German-Americans in the U.S. at that time, the situation (for them) was handled quite differently (apparently on a very limited, case-by-case basis). I imagine that there were many millions of German-American U.S. citizens at that time.

Ed

---------------------------
From your source:
"Italian American internment refers to the internmentof non-citizen Italians in the United States during World War II. Unlike the Japanese Americans who were interned during the war, they have never received reparations.[1] However, unlike Japanese-Americans, who were rounded up whether citizens or not, only non-citizen Italians were rounded up.[2] In 2010, the California Legislature passed a resolution apologizing for the mistreatment of Italian residents.[3]"

"Indeed, both foreign-born and native-born Japanese Americans and both citizens and non-citizens were interned, though the majority (about 60 percent) were in fact native-born U.S. citizens.[9][10][11]Italian Americans interned under the War Relocation Authority were not arrested under the Enemy Alien Act, but were simply "persons" removed under the War Relocation Authority."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian-American_internment
------------------------------------

German internment during WWII
"At the start of World War II, under the authority of the Alien Enemies Act of 1798, the United States government detained and interned over 11,000 German enemy aliens, as well as a small number of German-American citizens, either naturalized or native-born. Their ranks included immigrants to the U.S. as well as visitors stranded in the U.S. by hostilities. In many cases, the families of the internees were allowed to remain together at internment camps in the U.S. In other cases, families were separated. Limited due process was allowed for those arrested and detained."

"The population of German citizens in the United States not to mention American citizens of German birth was far too large for a general policy of internment comparable to that used in the case of the Japanese in America.[23] Instead, German citizens were detained and evicted from coastal areas on an individual basis. The War Department considered mass expulsions from coastal areas for reasons of military security, but never executed such plans.[24]"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German-American_internment

------------------------------------------------

Wikipedia is wrong. Although the majority of Italians interred during WWII were not citizens a very large number of them were. A total of over 10,000 Italian-Amercians were interred.

Many of them were prominent in the Italian-American community and there were many families among them. Non were ever given the opportunity to serve in the Armed forces as the Japanese were.

An aside, the Japanese-American Battalion serving in the European theater was the most decorated unit in the War. Not just the unit, which receiver\d many unit citations, but individual members of unit received many awards for thei valor. So many, in fact, that per capita more medals were awarded than in any other military unit.

The whole handling of the Japanese, Germans and Italians is a horrendous blot on our history. And the reasons behind it are far more convoluted than the current mea culpa rewrite of history that has become the "official" story.

There was real concern that all three populations were rife with traitors and subversives. In the case of the Japanese there was also an underlying racism, having nothing to do with the war exacerbated by the treachery of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. As a result there was a real fear that the Japanese-Americans would be in danger from their fellow Americans. The whole story is even more complicated than that. However, the only part of the story allowed to officially circulate today, is that we did a bad thing all racial based.

An interesting side note, when I lived on Bainbridge Island, WA, the site where the first Japanese- Americans were rounded up and shipped off, I lived down the street from what had been, prior to the War, the home of Japanese Council in Seattle. His home was right on the waters of Rich Passage which was the main route of US Naval vessels from the Bremerton Navy Yards and Navy installations in and around Puget Sound. When he was interred before being repatriated to Japan as all diplomats are at the beginning of war, when the home was entered by the authorities it waqs found to contained a sophisticated (for the time) set up to monitor and photograph the movement of Naval units with radio capability allowing for the transmittal of data and photographs.
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