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Dating a Protestant

Oct 01 new
Since Protestants are also Christian but probably don't except all the Catholic Churches teachings, would there be any big problems? Your thoughts, please. wave

I wouldn't think theres anything wrong with having Protestant friends as long as they obey the 10 commandments and follow the Golden Rule.
Oct 01 new
(quote) Tom-432657 said: Since Protestants are also Christian but probably don't except all the Catholic Churches teachings, would there be any big problems? Your thoughts, please.

I wouldn't think theres anything wrong with having Protestant friends as long as they obey the 10 commandments and follow the Golden Rule.
There's more to being a Catholic than obeying the 10 Commandments and the Golden Rule. A lot more. The Holy Mass, The sacrament of Reconciliation, contraception, the saints, the Teaching of the Church, just to name a few. I've just scratched the surface.

Another reason I'm against it is I'm the product of an interfaith marriage. My father is Catholic and my mother was Protestant. I think we might have been raised more faithful Catholics is my mother had been Catholic.

This is from someone who was a Protestant for at least 18 years.
Oct 01 new
Living in the lower end of the Bible Belt I have to admit that most of my best friends are, or at some point in time have been, Protestant. My friends are all vibrant, Christ-filled, loving people, but there are a lot of things that they don't understand, willfully misunderstand in spite of explanation, and things about which they don't wish to know the truth.
The biggest problem with dating someone not of the faith is just that... they might not understand where you're coming from or hold some of your values in kind as far as raising potential children in the faith, they also probably won't understand, or want to understand, what makes the Church different from their church and it may lead to misunderstandings in a marriage type relationship... it's definitely something to place in God's hands and ask for his guidance.
Oct 02 new
Speaking for myself I will not do that again. I was raised Catholic and my ex Southern Baptist. We were young and in love and thought we would figure it. After eleven years we never did and this was one of the two devisive issues that resulted in our divorce. That is why I am here on CM...marriage is hard enough as it is without introducing different religions/denominations into the mix.
Oct 04 new
(quote) Tom-432657 said: Since Protestants are also Christian but probably don't except all the Catholic Churches teachings, would there be any big problems? Your thoughts, please.

I wouldn't think theres anything wrong with having Protestant friends as long as they obey the 10 commandments and follow the Golden Rule.
Hey Tom -

I actually came across a similar problem not too long ago. Check out the thread here:

www.catholicmatch.com

I would argue that we are first called to love someone as a child of God. However, loving someone as a child of God and dating them are two very different things. There was a lot of awesome advice given in that thread. I think that the one point which really hit home to me was that you need to be clear about boundaries in the relationship if you decide to pursue it. By that, I mean that you need to remember to love and respect yourself as a child of God - make sure that the other person knows where you stand on key issues, and address those issues before you put your heart on the line in a dating situation. Things like premarital sex, contraception, etc., will come up in some dating situations, and many Protestants are not familiar with the Catholic stance on these issues. By gently showing the other person where you stand, you can see if they're really interested in you as a child of God, or whether or they're objectifying you or the potential relationship.

Finally, pray about it. Go spend time with Jesus at Adoration and ask Him about it. Pray a rosary and offer the intention of whether or not to date this person to the Blessed Mother (she's AWESOME with that stuff!). Invoke the aid of your patron saint to pray for you to God and ask for His Holy protection for your heart. And we'll all pray for you, too! :)


Oct 05 new
For me, I think that dating and friendship are two different things when it comes to this. I have many friends who are not Catholic - Protestant, Mormon, Jewish, agnostic, atheist... we can be friends on a lot of different levels and even talk about faith, what unites or separates us. But when I think about a dating relationship, especially as someone who looks toward marriage, I feel like it would be more difficult. The ability to participate in the Sacraments together and bring children up in that is something unique to Catholicism. There are many wonderful Protestants, people of strong faith who love Jesus and follow the Ten Commandments and the Golden Rule. While I won't say I'd never, ever marry a Protestant (God works in crazy ways sometimes), I think it i would be a more difficult path and that's why I joined this site - to look for someone who shared my values. Just my two cents, for what's it's worth :)
Jan 12 new
(quote) Tom-432657 said: Since Protestants are also Christian but probably don't except all the Catholic Churches teachings, would there be any big problems? Your thoughts, please.

I wouldn't think theres anything wrong with having Protestant friends as long as they obey the 10 commandments and follow the Golden Rule.
I recently dated a Protestant man. We discussed our faiths at length and were able to respect each other's beliefs. We discussed marriage and how we could assimilate our faiths into daily life. However, he had great difficulty accepting parts of our Catholic faith (role of Mary, statues in my home, Eucharist). He was willing to learn more about my faith and explore the aspects that were hard for him to believe. Unfortunately, there were other problems with our dating relationship (that would be a whole different forum!) that caused me to end the relationship. That being said, this experience definitely caused me to rethink dating a non-Catholic man. It is important that my partner attend Mass with me, participate in the sacraments, and support my beliefs. Hence the reason why I am here on CM.
Jan 12 new

Good Morning All

I like this thread as I feel that much is lost in the myopic thinking regarding Religion. Consider that Religion is a means of an individual to seek and find His/Her salvation. Think of Religion as a Vehicle be it a Cadillac, Ford, Bicycle, Boat, Roller scates, air plane, et all.

We all seek the same destination, God in Heaven. I fully understand the love and protection of the Catholic faith, however consider that those of other Christion Religions have the same faith and respect for their own Sect. I see everyone akin to being a supporter of a football team, political party, movie actor etc., etc. Everyone wants to walk away with the Oscar or Trophy. We are saddened if we loose, but will back the same team, actor and yes Religion next year. Which vehicle do you wish to ride on your journey?

It is easy to say, "We have the Truth". What does that mean? Does not the other Religions speak their Truth? The truth in a Religion is the ability of each participants ability to comprehand the message. It is a disservice to harbor the thinking that other Religions are false. We should be happy that those we meet in life have some kind of religion to guide them as long as it is a religion of compassion and love.

When each of us arrive in Heaven we shall meet many who are there without being Catholic. I cannot accept in any shape or form that Heaven is only for Catholics. Keep in mind that Religion is a Business (the largest business in the world) but Faith is what we have that will carry each of us to the Heavenly Garden. If an individual has a faith that he/she believes in completely then we shall see him/her in Heaven

Have a wonderful day and God love and protect all

Philip

Jan 16 new
This is the young people's room, the room for prospective parents.


How do you inspire your children to consider religious life, or to be lay evangelists in their daily lives, if to do so is to say to them that it is more important to propagate your faith rather than Dad's faith or Mom's faith, or do you, for the sake of not hurting your spouse's feelings, never put the option of becoming a Catholic religious or a Catholic lay evangelist before your children?


If you encourage your son, for example, to consider the priesthood, are you not impliedly discouraging him from considering becoming a Baptist pastor? How would your Baptist spouse feel?


If to marry within the Catholic context is not only to be open to life but open to life that is encouraged to consider making its way into religious orders, should you consider whether it is a good thing, as a prospective parent, to marry a non-Catholic spouse, especially one who is as serious about his or her faith as you are (or should be) of yours?
Jan 16 new
(quote) Roystan-340472 said: This is the young people's room, the room for prospective parents.


How do you inspire your children to consider religious life, or to be lay evangelists in their daily lives, if to do so is to say to them that it is more important to propagate your faith rather than Dad's faith or Mom's faith, or do you, for the sake of not hurting your spouse's feelings, never put the option of becoming a Catholic religious or a Catholic lay evangelist before your children?


If you encourage your son, for example, to consider the priesthood, are you not impliedly discouraging him from considering becoming a Baptist pastor? How would your Baptist spouse feel?


If to marry within the Catholic context is not only to be open to life but open to life that is encouraged to consider making its way into religious orders, should you consider whether it is a good thing, as a prospective parent, to marry a non-Catholic spouse, especially one who is as serious about his or her faith as you are (or should be) of yours?
Very important thoughts - and very true!
I made the mistake of marrying out of the Faith - biggest mistake of my life! I have 6 children by this man but we never 'were one' and never did the most important things to my heart ever mean anything to him. I am recently annulled and free from that mistake. Some people can marry outside their faith and have it work, but usually because neither holds dear their faith - and who wants to live their faith superficially, knowing God hates a lukewarm Catholic?
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