Faith Focused Dating. Create your Free Profile and meet your Match! Sign Up for Free
A place to learn, mingle, and share

Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
Learn More: Tobias & Sarah as led by Saint Raphael

Are you a captivating...

Oct 6th 2013 new
...Roman Catholic?

By now most uber-romantics, both men and women, have read the national best sellers "Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man's Heart" and "Captivating: Unveiling the Mystery of the Woman's Soul" by John and Stasi Eldredge. Unless, you are farther gone than a zombie in World War Z, the books lit a fire in your soul. faint If you have not read either, please do yourself the favor and, at least. read the reviews. Otherwise, the following will likely make little sense.

The themes of masculine and feminine spirituality are always timely, but now that Pope Francis' has called for a more profound Theology of Woman...it seems timely to revisit them again.

The diagnosis of both books, if I may offer a summary that will necessarily fall short, is that Our Lord is not calling either men or women to be 'really nice Church mice'. (Even the Little Flower and Mary were not thoroughly domesticated. We know one of the first things Mary did when she got the Good News was travel, far and inconveniently, to visit her cousin Elizabeth). No one is inspired to grow up and be 'nice'. Its not one of the seven virtues. Or, the fruit of the Spirit. I'm not sure it is even a Biblical concept. Mother Teresa might as well have said instead of the word 'success' at the end of her famous quote, "God calls us to faithfulness, not niceness." In fact, 'nice' might the deficient vice of the excess vice of 'success'. Where lies the golden mean? An entire (controversial) Catholic Internet ministry is built upon battling the "Church of Nice". Likewise, Pope Francis is calling religious and lay persons, in his own inimitable Jesuit Marian Franciscan way, to march to leave the comfort zone of the Church pews, extend our Mercy Hospital (M.A.S.H. unit? :) to the 'existential peripheries', near the suffering, in the battle field acquiring the 'smell of sheep'.

Again to be woefully brief, Eldredge's prescription for what most ails domesticated church men is that men deep down secretly desire 'A Battle to fight. An Adventure to live. A Beauty to rescue.' (Even as I wrote this to get the exact quotes the website had semi-nude images flashing on the side screen. If you don't think there is a battle. Not sure what planet you are on... Joining a monastery or becoming a Luddite can't be a realistic answer for most). The Eldredges write, "Women long for the same three things: to be romanced, to play an irreplaceable role in a great adventure and to unveil beauty. That's what makes a woman come alive,"

I haven't read the books for sometime, but they likely quote St. Ireneaus who wrote in the second century Gloria Dei est vivens homo, "The glory of God is man fully alive (or living man)." This quote has been hijacked somewhat by the self-help crowd, but it still gets to a core answer.

Of course, I have a "Catholic answer" to Eldredge's diagnosis and prescription, but I've already rambled on too long. I really hope more than a few of my brothers and sisters might offer their own insights on the unique Catholic way of being captivating and how it fulfills and surpasses what many consider very good conversational starting point offered by Eldredges' books and ministry.



















Oct 6th 2013 new
(quote) David-174079 said: ...Roman Catholic?

By now most uber-romantics, both men and women, have read the national best sellers "Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man's Heart" and "Captivating: Unveiling the Mystery of the Woman's Soul" by John and Stasi Eldredge. Unless, you are farther gone than a zombie in World War Z, the books lit a fire in your soul. If you have not read either, please do yourself the favor and, at least. read the reviews. Otherwise, the following will likely make little sense.

The themes of masculine and feminine spirituality are always timely, but now that Pope Francis' has called for a more profound Theology of Woman...it seems timely to revisit them again.

The diagnosis of both books, if I may offer a summary that will necessarily fall short, is that Our Lord is not calling either men or women to be 'really nice Church mice'. (Even the Little Flower and Mary were not thoroughly domesticated. We know one of the first things Mary did when she got the Good News was travel, far and inconveniently, to visit her cousin Elizabeth). No one is inspired to grow up and be 'nice'. Its not one of the seven virtues. Or, the fruit of the Spirit. I'm not sure it is even a Biblical concept. Mother Teresa might as well have said instead of the word 'success' at the end of her famous quote, "God calls us to faithfulness, not niceness." In fact, 'nice' might the deficient vice of the excess vice of 'success'. Where lies the golden mean? An entire (controversial) Catholic Internet ministry is built upon battling the "Church of Nice". Likewise, Pope Francis is calling religious and lay persons, in his own inimitable Jesuit Marian Franciscan way, to march to leave the comfort zone of the Church pews, extend our Mercy Hospital (M.A.S.H. unit? :) to the 'existential peripheries', near the suffering, in the battle field acquiring the 'smell of sheep'.

Again to be woefully brief, Eldredge's prescription for what most ails domesticated church men is that men deep down secretly desire 'A Battle to fight. An Adventure to live. A Beauty to rescue.' (Even as I wrote this to get the exact quotes the website had semi-nude images flashing on the side screen. If you don't think there is a battle. Not sure what planet you are on... Joining a monastery or becoming a Luddite can't be a realistic answer for most). The Eldredges write, "Women long for the same three things: to be romanced, to play an irreplaceable role in a great adventure and to unveil beauty. That's what makes a woman come alive,"

I haven't read the books for sometime, but they likely quote St. Ireneaus who wrote in the second century Gloria Dei est vivens homo, "The glory of God is man fully alive (or living man)." This quote has been hijacked somewhat by the self-help crowd, but it still gets to a core answer.

Of course, I have a "Catholic answer" to Eldredge's diagnosis and prescription, but I've already rambled on too long. I really hope more than a few of my brothers and sisters might offer their own insights on the unique Catholic way of being captivating and how it fulfills and surpasses what many consider very good conversational starting point offered by Eldredges' books and ministry.



















It is certainly the case that the complementarity that exists between the sexes has been under constant attack in our (Marxist) "equality" minded culture. Rather than celebrating the unique gifts that the feminine brings, the unfortunate consequence of such desired equality is to minimize these gifts and emphasize the ways that women can compete and even exceed men in their sphere. This rejection of the gifts of the feminine has had a negative impact on the gifts of masculinity as the wonderful ways that men contribute are not emphasized, but rather the negative consequences of power abused. So the "equality" is based not on virtue but on how much power one wields. I think both of the Eldredge books are attempts to emphasize what is beautiful about both the masculine and the feminine and to inspire men and women to become fully what they are created to be!
Oct 6th 2013 new
(quote) David-174079 said: ...Roman Catholic?

By now most uber-romantics, both men and women, have read the national best sellers "Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man's Heart" and "Captivating: Unveiling the Mystery of the Woman's Soul" by John and Stasi Eldredge. Unless, you are farther gone than a zombie in World War Z, the books lit a fire in your soul. If you have not read either, please do yourself the favor and, at least. read the reviews. Otherwise, the following will likely make little sense.

The themes of masculine and feminine spirituality are always timely, but now that Pope Francis' has called for a more profound Theology of Woman...it seems timely to revisit them again.

The diagnosis of both books, if I may offer a summary that will necessarily fall short, is that Our Lord is not calling either men or women to be 'really nice Church mice'. (Even the Little Flower and Mary were not thoroughly domesticated. We know one of the first things Mary did when she got the Good News was travel, far and inconveniently, to visit her cousin Elizabeth). No one is inspired to grow up and be 'nice'. Its not one of the seven virtues. Or, the fruit of the Spirit. I'm not sure it is even a Biblical concept. Mother Teresa might as well have said instead of the word 'success' at the end of her famous quote, "God calls us to faithfulness, not niceness." In fact, 'nice' might the deficient vice of the excess vice of 'success'. Where lies the golden mean? An entire (controversial) Catholic Internet ministry is built upon battling the "Church of Nice". Likewise, Pope Francis is calling religious and lay persons, in his own inimitable Jesuit Marian Franciscan way, to march to leave the comfort zone of the Church pews, extend our Mercy Hospital (M.A.S.H. unit? :) to the 'existential peripheries', near the suffering, in the battle field acquiring the 'smell of sheep'.

Again to be woefully brief, Eldredge's prescription for what most ails domesticated church men is that men deep down secretly desire 'A Battle to fight. An Adventure to live. A Beauty to rescue.' (Even as I wrote this to get the exact quotes the website had semi-nude images flashing on the side screen. If you don't think there is a battle. Not sure what planet you are on... Joining a monastery or becoming a Luddite can't be a realistic answer for most). The Eldredges write, "Women long for the same three things: to be romanced, to play an irreplaceable role in a great adventure and to unveil beauty. That's what makes a woman come alive,"

I haven't read the books for sometime, but they likely quote St. Ireneaus who wrote in the second century Gloria Dei est vivens homo, "The glory of God is man fully alive (or living man)." This quote has been hijacked somewhat by the self-help crowd, but it still gets to a core answer.

Of course, I have a "Catholic answer" to Eldredge's diagnosis and prescription, but I've already rambled on too long. I really hope more than a few of my brothers and sisters might offer their own insights on the unique Catholic way of being captivating and how it fulfills and surpasses what many consider very good conversational starting point offered by Eldredges' books and ministry.



















Is flirting a way to be captivating? fluffy
Oct 6th 2013 new
(quote) David-174079 said: ...Roman Catholic?

By now most uber-romantics, both men and women, have read the national best sellers "Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man's Heart" and "Captivating: Unveiling the Mystery of the Woman's Soul" by John and Stasi Eldredge. Unless, you are farther gone than a zombie in World War Z, the books lit a fire in your soul. If you have not read either, please do yourself the favor and, at least. read the reviews. Otherwise, the following will likely make little sense.

The themes of masculine and feminine spirituality are always timely, but now that Pope Francis' has called for a more profound Theology of Woman...it seems timely to revisit them again.

The diagnosis of both books, if I may offer a summary that will necessarily fall short, is that Our Lord is not calling either men or women to be 'really nice Church mice'. (Even the Little Flower and Mary were not thoroughly domesticated. We know one of the first things Mary did when she got the Good News was travel, far and inconveniently, to visit her cousin Elizabeth). No one is inspired to grow up and be 'nice'. Its not one of the seven virtues. Or, the fruit of the Spirit. I'm not sure it is even a Biblical concept. Mother Teresa might as well have said instead of the word 'success' at the end of her famous quote, "God calls us to faithfulness, not niceness." In fact, 'nice' might the deficient vice of the excess vice of 'success'. Where lies the golden mean? An entire (controversial) Catholic Internet ministry is built upon battling the "Church of Nice". Likewise, Pope Francis is calling religious and lay persons, in his own inimitable Jesuit Marian Franciscan way, to march to leave the comfort zone of the Church pews, extend our Mercy Hospital (M.A.S.H. unit? :) to the 'existential peripheries', near the suffering, in the battle field acquiring the 'smell of sheep'.

Again to be woefully brief, Eldredge's prescription for what most ails domesticated church men is that men deep down secretly desire 'A Battle to fight. An Adventure to live. A Beauty to rescue.' (Even as I wrote this to get the exact quotes the website had semi-nude images flashing on the side screen. If you don't think there is a battle. Not sure what planet you are on... Joining a monastery or becoming a Luddite can't be a realistic answer for most). The Eldredges write, "Women long for the same three things: to be romanced, to play an irreplaceable role in a great adventure and to unveil beauty. That's what makes a woman come alive,"

I haven't read the books for sometime, but they likely quote St. Ireneaus who wrote in the second century Gloria Dei est vivens homo, "The glory of God is man fully alive (or living man)." This quote has been hijacked somewhat by the self-help crowd, but it still gets to a core answer.

Of course, I have a "Catholic answer" to Eldredge's diagnosis and prescription, but I've already rambled on too long. I really hope more than a few of my brothers and sisters might offer their own insights on the unique Catholic way of being captivating and how it fulfills and surpasses what many consider very good conversational starting point offered by Eldredges' books and ministry.



















I read John Eldredge's book years and gave it to my former husband one year as a birthday gift. He wasn't interested and was actually upset that I would even consider giving him a "book" to read, though his first gift to me was The Imitation of Christ.

I think it would be WONDERFUL if all men and women adopted the "wild at heart" philosophy. Unfortunately too many people are focused on getting their needs met in a relationship that they don't have time for anything else.

I look forward to reading Stasi's book.
Oct 7th 2013 new
(quote) Michelle-860764 said: Is flirting a way to be captivating?
No.

Flirting is a superficial attempt to get the attention of another person. To be captivating there needs to be substance behind it.

Oct 7th 2013 new
I'm too ignorant (not a bad word...I am anxious to learn) to know the all the roots of the current disordered situation we are in. All I know is that both femininity and masculinity, both fatherhood and motherhood, are under heavy assault and if there is any place that has a modicum of a chance to mount any counter measures it would be a forum between men and women looking for true love on mediums such as CM. I'm unsatisfied with the Eldredge's prescription, though it is better than a shooting a water pistol in a range wildfire.
Oct 7th 2013 new
(quote) Jerry-74383 said: No.

Flirting is a superficial attempt to get the attention of another person. To be captivating there needs to be substance behind it.

Jerry, are you trying to tell me I am not captivating and I have no substance? Ouch eyebrow
Oct 7th 2013 new
Is a shiny lure all you need to catch a fish? eyebrow
Oct 7th 2013 new
(quote) Michelle-860764 said: Jerry, are you trying to tell me I am not captivating and I have no substance? Ouch
You asked a question about flirting, not about yourself. I apologize if my response was taken personally: it never even occurred to me that it might be.

Oct 7th 2013 new
I'd suggest the Imitation of Christ, True Devotion to Mary by St. Louis de Montfort, both books by the Eldredge's, a box of chocolates and a six pack of beer, a sense of humor and a very slow dance might be enough to jump start any stalled relationship. Praying rose . biggrin hug
Posts 1 - 10 of 31