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When you hear people say they've been "saved" (Baptist religion, mainly?) Is there a ceremony involved?


Oct 19th 2013 new
(quote) Julie-42315 said: When you hear people say they've been "saved" (Baptist religion, mainly?) Is there a ceremony involved?


I believe that's a reference to having been baptized.

Ultimately, what it means that they are very seriously mistaken...
Oct 19th 2013 new
(quote) Julie-42315 said: When you hear people say they've been "saved" (Baptist religion, mainly?) Is there a ceremony involved?


Most Baptists believe that not even baptism is required for salvation, but just "faith" in Jesus Christ. Baptists do not baptize members until well into adulthood (a serious shortcoming), and some never get baptized at all but consider one another "saved".

I concur with Jerry, regardless of these notions that fall short of the full teachings of Jesus Christ, they are gravely misguided and mistaken. Their beliefs fall short of the written word in the bible alone. It's hard to comprehend so much of their denial. I used to room in college with a Southern Baptist. After college he went on to become a Southern Baptist Minister. We used to have some genuinely good talks about Christianity, but we were never able to bridge the gap that separated our differences.

Recently, there is a bit of a theological battle going on between Baptists. In one of the declarations, this is what they write about salvation but some no longer agree with it: the proclamation of the Gospel is Gods means of bringing any person to salvation. It is certainly correct in denying that any person is regenerated apart from hearing and responding to the Gospel.

This is not consistent with Catholic teaching. Also, I am of the understanding that the Catholic Church does not recognize baptisms of Baptists because they do not meet sacramental requirements. I will check on this, and correct if wrong, unless someone else beats me to it.
Oct 19th 2013 new
A lot of times they also mean someone who has a personal relationship with Jesus. I come from a non denominational background and they often lumped people as saved or unsaved, believers or unbelievers. People that were saved and believers were those that prayed the sinners prayer. This is pretty common especially in evangelical culture. Most evangelicals think this is the end all be all and that even being apart of a church is not necessary though it does help your faith.
Oct 19th 2013 new
(quote) John-971967 said: Most Baptists believe that not even baptism is required for salvation, but just "faith" in Jesus Christ. Baptists do not baptize members until well into adulthood (a serious shortcoming), and some never get baptized at all but consider one another "saved".

I concur with Jerry, regardless of these notions that fall short of the full teachings of Jesus Christ, they are gravely misguided and mistaken. Their beliefs fall short of the written word in the bible alone. It's hard to comprehend so much of their denial. I used to room in college with a Southern Baptist. After college he went on to become a Southern Baptist Minister. We used to have some genuinely good talks about Christianity, but we were never able to bridge the gap that separated our differences.

Recently, there is a bit of a theological battle going on between Baptists. In one of the declarations, this is what they write about salvation but some no longer agree with it: the proclamation of the Gospel is Gods means of bringing any person to salvation. It is certainly correct in denying that any person is regenerated apart from hearing and responding to the Gospel.

This is not consistent with Catholic teaching. Also, I am of the understanding that the Catholic Church does not recognize baptisms of Baptists because they do not meet sacramental requirements. I will check on this, and correct if wrong, unless someone else beats me to it.
Last I looked, their baptismal formula was correct.

The fact that there are now over 30000 Protestant sects says a lot. Even the phrase " are you saved" means different things to different people. There are at least a dozen different kinds of Baptists within twenty miles of me. No two teach the same thing. One thing I can say that many have in common however is their dislike of Catholics.

I am constantly having to learn more of what these various sects think and teach as my ex wife drags my children from heresy to heresy. Makes for some pretty twisted theology.
Oct 19th 2013 new
(quote) Tim-734178 said: Last I looked, their baptismal formula was correct.
For the sacrament to be valid you need proper Form + Matter & Intent.

In many cases baptisms are valid yet, some are not when one or more of the above is demonstrably excluded or an essential element denied.
Oct 19th 2013 new
(quote) John-971967 said: For the sacrament to be valid you need proper Form + Matter & Intent.

In many cases baptisms are valid yet, some are not when one or more of the above is demonstrably excluded or an essential element denied.
The few protestant baptisms I have witnessed mostly prior to my conversion in 1980 had all three. Where you run into trouble, Is with Pentecostals and with sects like the Mormons the Jehovah witness and the Seventh-day Adventist. These groups either use invalid formulas or in actuality in valid intent. Mormons even baptize the bed.

The intent is there, though the understanding as a sacrament is not.
Oct 19th 2013 new
(quote) Tim-734178 said: The few protestant baptisms I have witnessed mostly prior to my conversion in 1980 had all three. Where you run into trouble, Is with Pentecostals and with sects like the Mormons the Jehovah witness and the Seventh-day Adventist. These groups either use invalid formulas or in actuality in valid intent. Mormons even baptize the bed.

The intent is there, though the understanding as a sacrament is not.
The dead not bed.
Oct 19th 2013 new
(quote) John-971967 said: Most Baptists believe that not even baptism is required for salvation, but just "faith" in Jesus Christ. Baptists do not baptize members until well into adulthood (a serious shortcoming), and some never get baptized at all but consider one another "saved".

I concur with Jerry, regardless of these notions that fall short of the full teachings of Jesus Christ, they are gravely misguided and mistaken. Their beliefs fall short of the written word in the bible alone. It's hard to comprehend so much of their denial. I used to room in college with a Southern Baptist. After college he went on to become a Southern Baptist Minister. We used to have some genuinely good talks about Christianity, but we were never able to bridge the gap that separated our differences.

Recently, there is a bit of a theological battle going on between Baptists. In one of the declarations, this is what they write about salvation but some no longer agree with it: the proclamation of the Gospel is Gods means of bringing any person to salvation. It is certainly correct in denying that any person is regenerated apart from hearing and responding to the Gospel.

This is not consistent with Catholic teaching. Also, I am of the understanding that the Catholic Church does not recognize baptisms of Baptists because they do not meet sacramental requirements. I will check on this, and correct if wrong, unless someone else beats me to it.
It all depends on the form that is used.

If the Baptism uses the proper Trinitarian formula, the Church recognizes it as valid. Some Baptists used the proper from and some don't.

So whether the Church recognizes one as valid depends on the circumstances. In the case of a convert when there is any doubt, the Church requires that a conditional Baptism be performed.
Oct 19th 2013 new
I remember years ago, one co-worker said to another that she accepted Jesus as her Lord and Savior. I think they both have ties to the south although they both live in N.Y. I have heard "accept" Jesus also. I was curious.

If it is about being baptized, isn't that something our religions have in common? We revere Jesus too. They celebrate Christmas (Jesus' birth) just like we do.

Why don't they like Catholics?
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