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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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Hello to all,

Please, before making comments and reading out of context, please read why I started this new thread. I do not want anyone to misintreprit what I am saying and I really don't look for negative comments in regards to a secular worlds advice or advances toward the catholic church. Nor do I look to the catholic who says they are catholic and justifies that he or she can receive the Eucharist without confession being at their dissposal. Granted, we are all unworthy to receive Jesus Christ, as a matter of fact, we mentioned that in regards to entering under our roofs in mass. I, by now means, and putting myself out there to say I am worthy or I am not. What I am stating, is that do we TRULY as CATHOLICS, understand to a certain degree in the capacity of our small brains, that we are truly receiving the body, blood and divinity of HE who SAVED us sinners?....Read on and enjoy.


The Holy Eucharist is the most important of the seven sacraments because, in this and in no other sacrament, we receive the very body and blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ. Innumerable, precious graces come to us through the reception of Holy Communion.

Communion is an intimate encounter with Christ, in which we sacramentally receive Christ into our bodies, that we may be more completely assimilated into his. "The Eucharist builds the Church," as Pope John Paul II said (Redemptor Hominis 20). It deepens unity with the Church, more fully assimilating us into Christ (1 Cor. 12:13; CCC 1396).

The Eucharist also strengthens the individual because in it Jesus himself, the Word made flesh, forgives our venial sins and gives us the strength to resist mortal sin. It is also the very channel of eternal life: Jesus himself.

In Johns gospel, Jesus summarized the reasons for receiving Communion when he said:

"Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, you have no life in you; he who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is real food, and my blood is real drink. He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood abides in me, and I in him. As the living Father sent me, and I live because of the Father, so he who eats me will live because of me. This is the bread which came down from heaven, not such as the fathers ate and died; he who eats this bread will live forever" (John 6:5358).

Because of the gravity of Jesus teaching on receiving the Eucharist, the Church encourages Catholics to receive frequent Communion, even daily Communion if possible, and mandates reception of the Eucharist at least once a year during the Easter season. Before going to Communion, however, there are several things one needs to know.

Catholics and Communion

The Church sets out specific guidelines regarding how we should prepare ourselves to receive the Lords body and blood in Communion. To receive Communion worthily, you must be in a state of grace, have made a good confession since your last mortal sin, believe in transubstantiation, observe the Eucharistic fast, and, finally, not be under an ecclesiastical censure such as excommunication.

First, you must be in a state of grace. "Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord. Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup" (1 Cor. 11:2728). This is an absolute requirement which can never be dispensed. To receive the Eucharist without sanctifying grace in your soul profanes the Eucharist in the most grievous manner.

A mortal sin is any sin whose matter is grave and which has been committed willfully and with knowledge of its seriousness. Grave matter includes, but is not limited to, murder, receiving or participating in an abortion, homosexual acts, having sexual intercourse outside of marriage or in an invalid marriage, and deliberately engaging in impure thoughts (Matt. 5:2829). Scripture contains lists of mortal sins (for example, 1 Cor. 6:910 and Gal. 5:1921). For further information on what constitutes a mortal sin, see the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

Out of habit and out of fear of what those around them will think if they do not receive Communion, some Catholics, in a state of mortal sin, choose to go forward and offend God rather than stay in the pew while others receive the Eucharist. The Churchs ancient teaching on this particular matter is expressed in the Didache, an early Christian document written around A.D. 70, which states: "Whosoever is holy [i.e., in a state of sanctifying grace], let him approach. Whosoever is not, let him repent" (Didache 10).

Second, you must have been to confession since your last mortal sin. The Didache witnesses to this practice of the early Church. "But first make confession of your faults, so that your sacrifice may be a pure one" (Didache 14).

The 1983 Code of Canon Law indicates that the same requirement applies today. "A person who is conscious of a grave sin is not to . . . receive the body of the Lord without prior sacramental confession unless a grave reason is present and there is no opportunity of confessing; in this case the person is to be mindful of the obligation to make an act of perfect contrition, including the intention of confessing as soon as possible" (CIC 916).

The requirement for sacramental confession can be dispensed if four conditions are fulfilled: (1) there must be a grave reason to receive Communion (for example, danger of death), (2) it must be physically or morally impossible to go to confession first, (3) the person must already be in a state of grace through perfect contrition, and (4) he must resolve to go to confession as soon as possible.

Third, you must believe in the doctrine of transubstantiation. "For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself" (1 Cor. 11:29). Transubstantiation means more than the Real Presence. According to transubstantiation, the bread and wine are actually transformed into the actual body, blood, soul, and divinity of Christ, with only the appearances of bread and wine remaining. This is why, at the Last Supper, Jesus held what appeared to be bread and wine, yet said: "This is my body. . . . This is my blood" (Mark 14:22-24, cf. Luke 22:14-20). If Christ were merely present along side bread and wine, he would have said "This contains my body. . . . This contains my blood," which he did not say.

Fourth, you must observe the Eucharistic fast. Canon law states, "One who is to receive the most Holy Eucharist is to abstain from any food or drink, with the exception only of water and medicine, for at least the period of one hour before Holy Communion" (CIC 919 1). Elderly people, those who are ill, and their caretakers are excused from the Eucharistic fast (CIC 191 3). Priests and deacons may not dispense one obligated by the Eucharistic fast unless the bishop has expressly granted such power to them (cf. CIC 89).

Finally, one must not be under an ecclesiastical censure. Canon law mandates, "Those who are excommunicated or interdicted after the imposition or declaration of the penalty and others who obstinately persist in manifest grave sin are not to be admitted to Holy Communion" (CIC 915).

Provided they are in a state of grace and have met the above requirements, Catholics should receive the Eucharist frequently (cic 898).


Nov 13 new
personally I cannot judge, as it is between the individual and God
Nov 13 new
(quote) Susan-857876 said: personally I cannot judge, as it is between the individual and God
I think Sharon's intention is to make people aware of the moral consideration, not to call out specific individuals as being unworthy to receive.

Nov 13 new
Is there a difference between contravening and disagreeing? What about those who choose in obedience to assent in will but cannot yet, in the truth of honesty, assent in mind?
Nov 13 new
(quote) Roystan-340472 said: Is there a difference between contravening and disagreeing? What about those who choose in obedience to assent in will but cannot yet, in the truth of honesty, assent in mind?
To assent in the will would require charity, which in and of itself eliminates anything opposed to God. Its the absence of charity in the will that makes people disagreeable. Faith resides in the intellect, but St. Thomas basically said lifeless and living faith were not distinct habits within the intellect, it's charity moving the will that distinguishes living and lifeless faith. Faith can only work by charity. Galations 55 For we in spirit, by faith, wait for the hope of justice.6 For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision: but faith that worketh by charity. Benedict has said "For this reason Luther's phrase: "faith alone" is true, if it is not opposed to faith in charity, in love." I suppose it begs the question... how does a person who has faith, though it may be lifeless, gain love?
Nov 13 new
(quote) Herbert-1016655 said: To assent in the will would require charity, which in and of itself eliminates anything opposed to God. Its the absence of charity in the will that makes people disagreeable. Faith resides in the intellect, but St. Thomas basically said lifeless and living faith were not distinct habits within the intellect, it's charity moving the will that distinguishes living and lifeless faith. Faith can only work by charity. Galations 55 For we in spirit, by faith, wait for the hope of justice.6 For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision: but faith that worketh by charity. Benedict has said "For this reason Luther's phrase: "faith alone" is true, if it is not opposed to faith in charity, in love." I suppose it begs the question... how does a person who has faith, though it may be lifeless, gain love?
How do you edit this stuff. I had it looking nice and neat before submitting
Nov 14 new
(quote) Susan-857876 said: personally I cannot judge, as it is between the individual and God
Good morning,

I am not judging, again it's not my job, I am not God (smile), I enjoy conversing thoughts, ideas and teachings of the church, not to judge, but rather share information with the best intentions to anyone who wants to read the forums. As I grow in my faith and have a strong desire to be on fire, I too, like to share in hopes it sparks and ignites someones journey along the way. Afterall, I read other forums here also, and truly respect their thoughts, ideas or maybe something they are just personally going thru. A person may not agree with what I write, and believe me, that's great....God gives us each free will to take what we want, utilize it or disregard it, ultimately it's up to the individual. I do appreciate your comments and wish you the absolute best!
Nov 14 new
(quote) Jerry-74383 said: I think Sharon's intention is to make people aware of the moral consideration, not to call out specific individuals as being unworthy to receive.

Good morning Jerry,

I am unworthy to receive! Amen to that! I am a sinner, I need absolution and so forth....You were right in your thoughts, I am not here to point out individuals unworthy to receive....I am on Noah's boat too, riding the waves with the rest of creation!
Nov 14 new
(quote) Herbert-1016655 said: How do you edit this stuff. I had it looking nice and neat before submitting
Good morning Herbert,


I think once you submit it, you cannot go back and edit?

blessings,
sharon
Nov 14 new
(quote) Herbert-1016655 said: To assent in the will would require charity, which in and of itself eliminates anything opposed to God. Its the absence of charity in the will that makes people disagreeable. Faith resides in the intellect, but St. Thomas basically said lifeless and living faith were not distinct habits within the intellect, it's charity moving the will that distinguishes living and lifeless faith. Faith can only work by charity. Galations 55 For we in spirit, by faith, wait for the hope of justice.6 For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision: but faith that worketh by charity. Benedict has said "For this reason Luther's phrase: "faith alone" is true, if it is not opposed to faith in charity, in love." I suppose it begs the question... how does a person who has faith, though it may be lifeless, gain love?
Good morning,

I always like to point out the fact that, research is what I am doing......when I don't know what I'm doing!

That's what makes our journeys so remarkeable. I'm not quite sure I understand your last sentence, how does a person who has faith, though it may be lifeless, gain love? Maybe you can help me with understanding that better? I would appreciate your thoughts in helping me understand.

blessings,
sharon
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