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This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

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Recently I came across some findings about reading that add to the longstanding agreement that reading and the encompassing academic discipline of English are a very important aspects of schooling both for success and for enrichment. Even if these findings are "old hat" to teachers of English, they may still draw a, "Impressive!", from those among us who don't keep up with life inside the "English" world.

The first item is this article which has been in many newspapers recently. The gist is that reading novels produces significant and measurable changes in the brain. www.medicalnewstoday.com

The second finding comes from analyzing over forty studies and surveys done by different departments, agencies and commissions of the federal government. The analysis was done by The National Endowment For The Arts under direction of Dana Gioia when he was its chairman. As would be expected, the results demonstrated a strong correlation between regular reading on the one hand and, on the other hand, forms of success such as academic and financial ones. What was surprising was that whether or not a person read literature was a more powerful indicator than any other in the surveys of whether he exercised, engaged in sports, was active in civil affairs, voted, did volunteer work and more generally was active in life outside of the house. Dana Gioia explains how he developed these results in this video, www.youtube.com , from 5:54 to 15:39.

The third finding comes from the graduate department of the business school at Carnegie-Mellon University. The department wanted to find out which undergraduate majors had the highest average rate of success in the graduate business program A study was designed to answer their question and the results showed that students who majored in English achieved the best outcomes. The department decided that this conclusion must be wrong and so redesigned the study, but got the same answer. The department then put the results "in a drawer" so to speak. The graduate department probably wanted undergraduates to major in business in order to keep the department's professors fully employed. Dana Gioia discusses these results in the same video from 18:11 to 20:44.

Off to the diner (library? scratchchin ) for some english dish delish, eyebrow

John

Dec 30th 2013 new

As to English grammar , I mention Churchill's dictum on ending a sentence with a preposition---

"Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put "

Dec 30th 2013 new
(quote) Albert-146514 said:

As to English grammar , I mention Churchill's dictum on ending a sentence with a preposition---

"Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put "

One could argue that, as used here, "put up with" is a verb with a meaning different from a literal "put up with" as in "put up with the apples on the shelf" and, further, that breaking it into two pieces changes not just the word order, but the meaning.

In breaking apart the verb "put up with" Churchill has done more than simply change the location of a preposition and so his example is not just an example with the single change of position of a preposition, which I think is what people assume when when they hear the rule about avoiding ending prepositions.

If that sentence were rendered as, "Ending a sentence with a preposition is something with which I will not put up", you could argue that the rule about terminating prepositions was not violated "in spirit" because the triple, "put up with", is, in this context, a verb as understood by readers.

Jan 6th 2014 new
(quote) John-184825 said:

One could argue that, as used here, "put up with" is a verb with a meaning different from a literal "put up with" as in "put up with the apples on the shelf" and, further, that breaking it into two pieces changes not just the word order, but the meaning.

In breaking apart the verb "put up with" Churchill has done more than simply change the location of a preposition and so his example is not just an example with the single change of position of a preposition, which I think is what people assume when when they hear the rule about avoiding ending prepositions.

If that sentence were rendered as, "Ending a sentence with a preposition is something with which I will not put up", you could argue that the rule about terminating prepositions was not violated "in spirit" because the triple, "put up with", is, in this context, a verb as understood by readers.

Instead....pick up an action verb...strong active voice---instead of the weakling passive voice... put up with

Ending a sentence with a preposition is something I cannot tolerate." muy bien!
Jan 7th 2014 new
(quote) Barbara-863769 said: Instead....pick up an action verb...strong active voice---instead of the weakling passive voice... put up with

Ending a sentence with a preposition is something I cannot tolerate." muy bien!
Strong active verbs make me tents and then I become tentative. cool
Jan 7th 2014 new
I can only enjoy this thread and not participate and I prefer jotting notes only
Jan 7th 2014 new
strong verbs can make me....content but NEVER contentious!!!!!
Jan 7th 2014 new

Not surprising.

When I was a sweet young thing (now I am a sweet older thing), I asked a very senior executive at Bank of America if he would prefer to hire someone with a degree in Accounting, Finance, or Management. "None of those," he said. "English or History, because they know how to talk to people."

Can't tell you, though, how many folks I've encountered who made huge salaries but who couldn't write two intelligent sentences. eyebrow

Jan 8th 2014 new

An ambiguous sentence in "Ulysses" , auth James Joyce.

"Mr. Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls."

???--- Is "relish" a Noun or an Adverb ?

Jan 9th 2014 new
(quote) Albert-146514 said:

An ambiguous sentence in "Ulysses" , auth James Joyce.

"Mr. Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls."

???--- Is "relish" a Noun or an Adverb ?

relish is still a noun

relish=food item to garnish his beast and fowl innards

with relish=adverbial prepositional phrase So the phrase is serving as an adverb, but relish is the object of the preposition "with" and can mean "gusto" (with what? with...gusto! so it's a "thing")

So Mr. Joyce the ultimate word player...uses a noun as an object of a preposition and it is a double-play! Take it either way...he keeps it NOUN both ways. laughing

Mr. Bloom| ate | organs
\relish \{beasts
and
{fowls (prep "with' goes on sl line/prep "of" goes on sl line with double obj/and=dotted line)
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