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Canibals

Mar 22nd 2014 new
I was sharing the miracle of Luciano with our school psychologist who is a liberal who believes in "connectedness" with everything rather than that one religion is correct.... go figure. Anyway, he stated that Catholics are cannibals then if we believe we are eating the body and blood of Christ. I've heard this directed at us before. I'm just not sure how to respond to it other than to say, "no" that isn't it. Anyway, any ideas?
Mar 22nd 2014 new
Here,,,,,I hope some of these links help:)

www.catholic.com

www.catholic.com

www.catholic.com

I just did a quick search on the Catholic Answers website. There are many more links, but I listed just a few.

Hope this helps, David.


Mar 22nd 2014 new
(quote) Cheryl-409772 said: I was sharing the miracle of Luciano with our school psychologist who is a liberal who believes in "connectedness" with everything rather than that one religion is correct.... go figure. Anyway, he stated that Catholics are cannibals then if we believe we are eating the body and blood of Christ. I've heard this directed at us before. I'm just not sure how to respond to it other than to say, "no" that isn't it. Anyway, any ideas?
HI Cheryl,
Below are a couple of links to explanations of this charge against Catholics.

I have read about and heard the charge but have never actually had anyone say it directly to me. My first thought, is that we consume Our Lord body and blood, soul and divinity -- in the form of bread and wine -- whose substance is changed into the body and blood of Our Lord.

Anthropologically, speaking -- cannibalism is not uncommon in reality and is often used as a perjorative because while not uncommon it is associated with the primitive, wicked, etc. And, so by throwing that charge out there most people are hoping to shock and repulse people, keeping them from either learning more about the topic, or ending a conversation they think they have won, or just to be obnoxious without giving it any thought.

There are several conditions related to cannibalism which are not found in the Eucharist and the articles address them. I hope these help some.
www.catholic.com

www.thecatholicthing.org

www.catholic.com


Mar 22nd 2014 new
Thanks...good resource with good answer.
Mar 22nd 2014 new
It's hard to be a cannibal without a knife and fork. laughing
Mar 22nd 2014 new
No doubt the links people have already provided are good, but this guy will have more "clever" jibes. You might say that we eat Our Lord's flesh and drink his blood because it gives us "connectedness." :)
Mar 24th 2014 new
The cannibalism charge, though ancient, is so inherently silly that if accused of it I would be tempted to reply, "You say that like it's a BAD thing!"
And actually, there's a serious point to that. I could put it this way: "Let's admit, just for the sake of argument, that we can stretch the meaning of the term 'cannibalism' so that it can be made to cover the consuming of the Eucharist. We object to cannibalism as an evil and immoral (as well as unhealthy and disgusting) act. But as God himself has mandated that we eat his flesh and drink his blood, we have no legitimate authority for saying that this command is evil and immoral, since God is the very source from which we derive our sense of good and evil. To say "God's command is evil" is to utter an inherently absurd statement. So the 'cannibalism' involved in consuming the Eucharist must be good, not evil. All other forms of cannibalism are, we agree, evil. To use the same word to describe something that is good and other things that are evil is, again, absurd. (It's always absurd to use the same word to describe things which are different in their moral nature). We can only escape the absurdity by giving different names to things which are different in their moral nature. Therefore we can't, in fact, use the term 'cannibalism' to describe the consuming of the Eucharist".
Since I make no claims to philosophical sophistication, I invite others to point out any flaws in this argument. It seems sound to me.
Mar 24th 2014 new
(quote) Sean-693950 said: No doubt the links people have already provided are good, but this guy will have more "clever" jibes. You might say that we eat Our Lord's flesh and drink his blood because it gives us "connectedness." :)

laughing brilliant! That is why it will go right over his head.


Mar 29th 2014 new
(quote) Cheryl-409772 said: I was sharing the miracle of Luciano with our school psychologist who is a liberal who believes in "connectedness" with everything rather than that one religion is correct.... go figure. Anyway, he stated that Catholics are cannibals then if we believe we are eating the body and blood of Christ. I've heard this directed at us before. I'm just not sure how to respond to it other than to say, "no" that isn't it. Anyway, any ideas?
While we receive Christ, body, blood, soul and divinity under the accidents of bread and wine in the Eucharist, in substance, we do not digest and metabolize the substance of Christ, just as we do not see the accidents of Our Lord in the Eucharist. We digest and metabolize only the species, accidents, appearances, which continue to exist in no substance. Once the species of bread and wine are no longer discernible, Our Lord ceases to be present under these species.
Mar 29th 2014 new
(quote) Cheryl-409772 said: I was sharing the miracle of Luciano with our school psychologist who is a liberal who believes in "connectedness" with everything rather than that one religion is correct.... go figure. Anyway, he stated that Catholics are cannibals then if we believe we are eating the body and blood of Christ. I've heard this directed at us before. I'm just not sure how to respond to it other than to say, "no" that isn't it. Anyway, any ideas?
The charge of cannibalism against Catholics is nothing new and was lodged by the ancient Romans against the early Christians for precisely this reason: that we consume the Body and Blood of the Lord.
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