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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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In my thesis work on the Wichita, I came across an article about the Lady in Blue that appeared to the Jumano groups of the Southern Plains and Southwest prior to the advent of the Spanish missionaries. The Lady in Blue is Sr. Maria de Agreda cloistered Abbess of a convent of Poor CLare's, who had visited the Jumano's and for a period of ten years taught them about Catholicism. so that when the Priests arrived they asked for Baptism and were well versed in the Catholic Faith. . .
It is a pretty interesting story. The Jumano groups (lots of smaller groups) were absorbed into Apache, Comanche and Wichita groups.

IN many places, Catholicism was very easily accepted by Native Groups, because of the tenets of the Faith and the ritual and the large engagement of familial ties. Godparentage was something already practiced by Native groups. Areas where the Jesuits first reached had less imposed conversion, unlike the Spanish areas, The Spanish method also required abandonment of their traditional lifeways, while the Jesuit plan was far more flexible in its approach and melded with the traditional.

I thought some of you might find this interesting as well. :-)


www.cambridgeconnections.net
Jun 6th new
(quote) Lauren-927923 said: In my thesis work on the Wichita, I came across an article about the Lady in Blue that appeared to the Jumano groups of the Southern Plains and Southwest prior to the advent of the Spanish missionaries. The Lady in Blue is Sr. Maria de Agreda cloistered Abbess of a convent of Poor CLare's, who had visited the Jumano's and for a period of ten years taught them about Catholicism. so that when the Priests arrived they asked for Baptism and were well versed in the Catholic Faith. . .
It is a pretty interesting story. The Jumano groups (lots of smaller groups) were absorbed into Apache, Comanche and Wichita groups.

IN many places, Catholicism was very easily accepted by Native Groups, because of the tenets of the Faith and the ritual and the large engagement of familial ties. Godparentage was something already practiced by Native groups. Areas where the Jesuits first reached had less imposed conversion, unlike the Spanish areas, The Spanish method also required abandonment of their traditional lifeways, while the Jesuit plan was far more flexible in its approach and melded with the traditional.

I thought some of you might find this interesting as well. :-)


http://www.cambridgeconnections.net/Article_TR_Dec08_reprint.pdf
Still reading your fascinating link about the Lady in Blue. Apparently we can no longer add pictures to these comments, but if you go to my profile I downloaded a picture I took of a new painting our pastor had commissioned to illustrate the first Baptism in the history of our parish 375 years ago. The massive 400 lb. painting was unveiled this past Easter Sunday and took the artist over seven months to complete. It illustrates the Baptism of the Piscataway Indians' chief. The Piscataway are native to my area just south of Washington, DC.
Jun 6th new
(quote) Peter-449116 said: Still reading your fascinating link about the Lady in Blue. Apparently we can no longer add pictures to these comments, but if you go to my profile I downloaded a picture I took of a new painting our pastor had commissioned to illustrate the first Baptism in the history of our parish 375 years ago. The massive 400 lb. painting was unveiled this past Easter Sunday and took the artist over seven months to complete. It illustrates the Baptism of the Piscataway Indians' chief. The Piscataway are native to my area just south of Washington, DC.
The painting is beautiful!!
Jun 9th new
I find it very interesting, that of all the trivia questions regarding Saints who could levitate etc. . .that only Peter and myself have been interested in the Abbess Maria de Agreda -- the bi-locating abbess from a cloister of Poor Clare's who visited and taught the groups on the Southern Plains BEFORE any Spanish priests made it there --- preparing them for Baptism and teaching them about the Faith. She was located by the Native's description of her when priests returned to Spain and even submitted to an Inquisition, being cleared of anything untoward.

The Lady in Blue --- pretty remarkable story/event.
Jun 9th new
(quote) Lauren-927923 said: I find it very interesting, that of all the trivia questions regarding Saints who could levitate etc. . .that only Peter and myself have been interested in the Abbess Maria de Agreda -- the bi-locating abbess from a cloister of Poor Clare's who visited and taught the groups on the Southern Plains BEFORE any Spanish priests made it there --- preparing them for Baptism and teaching them about the Faith. She was located by the Native's description of her when priests returned to Spain and even submitted to an Inquisition, being cleared of anything untoward.

The Lady in Blue --- pretty remarkable story/event.
I glanced at the article a couple days ago and didn't catch on that it involved bilocation! cool
Jun 9th new
(quote) Peter-449116 said: Still reading your fascinating link about the Lady in Blue. Apparently we can no longer add pictures to these comments, but if you go to my profile I downloaded a picture I took of a new painting our pastor had commissioned to illustrate the first Baptism in the history of our parish 375 years ago. The massive 400 lb. painting was unveiled this past Easter Sunday and took the artist over seven months to complete. It illustrates the Baptism of the Piscataway Indians' chief. The Piscataway are native to my area just south of Washington, DC.
I love the painting!
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