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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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Jun 18th 2014 new
Text form of the sermon: www.olrl.org

Jun 18th 2014 new
Very interesting sermon, my question to is how the following statement from paragraph 8 of the sermon fits in with the limited number of pardons

Listen to the words of St. Gregory: "He who has promised pardon to penitents, has not promised tomorrow to sinners" Hom. 12 in Evan. God has promised pardon to all who repent;

The underlined statement above seems to go against much of the rest of the sermon in that it does not seem to quantify God's promise.
Jun 18th 2014 new
(quote) Dave-976637 said: Very interesting sermon, my question to is how the following statement from paragraph 8 of the sermon fits in with the limited number of pardons

Listen to the words of St. Gregory: "He who has promised pardon to penitents, has not promised tomorrow to sinners" Hom. 12 in Evan. God has promised pardon to all who repent;

The underlined statement above seems to go against much of the rest of the sermon in that it does not seem to quantify God's promise.
I understood the meaning to be that if you live until tomorrow and repent, you will receive pardon, but it is not guaranteed that you will live until tomorrow. So the number of pardons may be limited by our death before repentance.
Jun 18th 2014 new
(quote) Susan-1048377 said: I understood the meaning to be that if you live until tomorrow and repent, you will receive pardon, but it is not guaranteed that you will live until tomorrow. So the number of pardons may be limited by our death before repentance.
and also he mentioned the HARDENED sinner who presumes he always has time on his side...
Jun 18th 2014 new
While I agree with both of your statements Susan and Bernard in regards to no guarantee there is a tomorrow, and that death would definitely place a limit on the number of pardons such person received while alive.

But the part that I highlighted does not seem to place a limit on the number of pardons available to be received through God, while the title of the sermon and the majority of the contents do seem to place a hard limit on the number of pardons available to be received. Thus the inclusion of the highlighted statement by St. Gregory seems to go against the content of the remainder of the sermon in my interpretation ( and I have no qualms about how badly I interpret things in life sometimes - and as such may just be reading it wrong).
Jun 18th 2014 new
(quote) Dave-976637 said:

But the part that I highlighted does not seem to place a limit on the number of pardons available to be received through God, while the title of the sermon and the majority of the contents do seem to place a hard limit on the number of pardons available to be received. 
I think you are right about this. Maybe it is for rhetorical purposes? He didn't mention sinning against the Holy Spirit, but that may have been the idea.
Jun 21st 2014 new
Having read the sermon, I think it is basically about presumption; plunging headlong into mortal sin thinking "oh, I can just confess it later". That's a wrong attitude to have. In fact that attitude, in itself, could be a mortal sin.
Jun 21st 2014 new
(quote) Edward-4511 said: Having read the sermon, I think it is basically about presumption; plunging headlong into mortal sin thinking "oh, I can just confess it later". That's a wrong attitude to have. In fact that attitude, in itself, could be a mortal sin.
I agree with Edward here. One of the things we always stressed in discussions of confession is that absolution is not guaranteed thing. If one shows no sign of repenting and turning away from a certain sin, it is possible that at some point the priest will refuse to give absolution. (of course that would suggest that the priest is aware of the habitual nature etc).

And, lest anyone object -- it is actually Christ who absolves the sins, the priest acts in Persona Christi during this sacrament.

It is usually brought up in the context of non-Catholics who assert that Catholics think they can do anything they want and then just go to confession. Which of course is not quite the whole story :-).

Having said that, heaven rejoices more over one sinner than 100 righteous men and his mercy is broad and unending, so I think he gives us every opportunity to reconcile ourselves to Him, but we must also be aware that our time within which to do so is both finite and uncertain as tomorrow is never promised to any of us, so we should not necessarily put off until tomorrow what we can take care of today.



Jun 21st 2014 new
(quote) Dave-976637 said: Text form of the sermon: http://www.olrl.org/snt_docs/num_sins.shtml

Dave, Thanks for the link to the text of the sermon It is actually a really nice homily. Pointing out that we must take advantage of the opportunity to repent today, to be active in fighting against temptation and mastering our weaker impulses, not ignoring it until a later time, nor just assuming God will forgive us -- It's about orienting our thinking properly, rather than letting us justify or find or create loopholes in our own thinking that allows us to persist in sinful behavior rather than actively seeking to master our sinful nature.

We truly don't know the hour and so we should prepare and live each day as if it is the last.
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