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Any Taiz Fan Here?

Jul 3rd 2014 new
Not sure where to post this question. Moderator, please move it to the correct forum if it doesn't belong here.

Before I moved to my current location, I used to belong to a Taiz meditative prayer group in the parish. I would love to have one in my current parish and I wonder if someone could help me with some pointers. The books about Taiz mostly were more complicated that the one I used to.
Jul 3rd 2014 new
(quote) Vonnie-1082837 said: Not sure where to post this question. Moderator, please move it to the correct forum if it doesn't belong here.

Before I moved to my current location, I used to belong to a Taiz meditative prayer group in the parish. I would love to have one in my current parish and I wonder if someone could help me with some pointers. The books about Taiz mostly were more complicated that the one I used to.
Not sure why CM cut of the "e". It's Taize
Jul 4th 2014 new
(quote) Vonnie-1082837 said: Not sure where to post this question. Moderator, please move it to the correct forum if it doesn't belong here.

Before I moved to my current location, I used to belong to a Taiz meditative prayer group in the parish. I would love to have one in my current parish and I wonder if someone could help me with some pointers. The books about Taiz mostly were more complicated that the one I used to.
The French Taize movement is not Catholic. It was founded after World War II by "Brother" Roger Schultz, a Protestant.

unamsanctamcatholicam.blogspot.com

It is true that several popes have spoken highly of it. Even so, the danger is the Taize Community promotes interdenominational worship; it encourages Catholics to worship with Protestants.

catholictrad.com

I would not recommend getting involved in Taize worship as you may find yourself embracing Protestantism.

p.s. I also had to modify the correct spelling of Taize as the 'e' was omitted during preview of my post.
Jul 4th 2014 new
(quote) Nicole-1018166 said: It is true that several popes have spoken highly of it. Even so, the danger is the Taize Community promotes interdenominational worship; it encourages Catholics to worship with Protestants.

Doesn't that imply a lack of confidence in one's Catholic faith? Mightn't it work the other way, with some of the Protestants becoming Catholic? I also note that Pope Francis has on at least one occasion prayed with a Muslim and a Jew, which seems far more extreme than praying with a Protestant. (Of course, my sedevacantist friend would reply, "Exactly--that's why 'Francis' is really just 'Mr. Bergoglio'!"). If Francis does it, he must be aware that he is setting up an example for imitation by the faithful -- it would be naive to think otherwise.
It does seem to me that if one can eat and drink with publicans and sinners, there should be no shame in praying with Protestants.
A cousin of mine, born Jewish, was recieved into the Anglican church this Easter. I attended the service and joined the Communion line, not to receive Communiion but for the blessing. Afterwards, not sure whether I had done right or wrong, I raised this in Confession and the priest laughed and said "That's no sin". Was he wrong?
Jul 4th 2014 new
(quote) Paul-1049651 said: Doesn't that imply a lack of confidence in one's Catholic faith? Mightn't it work the other way, with some of the Protestants becoming Catholic? I also note that Pope Francis has on at least one occasion prayed with a Muslim and a Jew, which seems far more extreme than praying with a Protestant. (Of course, my sedevacantist friend would reply, "Exactly--that's why 'Francis' is really just 'Mr. Bergoglio'!"). If Francis does it, he must be aware that he is setting up an example for imitation by the faithful -- it would be naive to think otherwise.
It does seem to me that if one can eat and drink with publicans and sinners, there should be no shame in praying with Protestants.
A cousin of mine, born Jewish, was recieved into the Anglican church this Easter. I attended the service and joined the Communion line, not to receive Communiion but for the blessing. Afterwards, not sure whether I had done right or wrong, I raised this in Confession and the priest laughed and said "That's no sin". Was he wrong?
I will object to your opening comment, as you are daring someone weaker in faith to embrace something dangerous to their soul. It's not a matter of strength but docility to God in avoiding occasions of sin.

Any strength come from God's free gift; it is only ours to lose by deliberate ignorance or reception of scandal.:
Jul 4th 2014 new
(quote) Steven-706921 said: I will object to your opening comment, as you are daring someone weaker in faith to embrace something dangerous to their soul. It's not a matter of strength but docility to God in avoiding occasions of sin.

Any strength come from God's free gift; it is only ours to lose by deliberate ignorance or reception of scandal.:
I'm not pretending to have more than a beginner's knowledge here, and am willing to learn, but I'll ask you to consider that it is at least not self-evident where the scandal lies and what the occasion of sin is in praying with a Protestant. Again, Pope Francis prayed with a Muslim and a Jew, and he must have been aware that in doing so he was legitimizing ecumenical prayer and encouraging others to engage in it by the force of his example. It's not clear that the message was "I can do this because my faith is strong - don't YOU try it, though".
Jul 4th 2014 new
(quote) Paul-1049651 said: Doesn't that imply a lack of confidence in one's Catholic faith? Mightn't it work the other way, with some of the Protestants becoming Catholic? I also note that Pope Francis has on at least one occasion prayed with a Muslim and a Jew, which seems far more extreme than praying with a Protestant. (Of course, my sedevacantist frienwould reply, "Exactly--that's why 'Francis' is really just 'Mr. Bergoglio'!"). If Francis does it, he must be aware that he is setting up an example for imitation by the faithful -- it would be naive to think otherwise.
It does seem to me that if one can eat and drink with publicans and sinners, there should be no shame in praying with Protestants.
A cousin of mine, born Jewish, was recieved into the Anglican church this Easter. I attended the service and joined the Communion line, not to receive Communiion but for the blessing. Afterwards, not sure whether I had done right or wrong, I raised this in Confession and the priest laughed and said "That's no sin". Was he wrong?
Of course, it our hope that our Protestant friends become Catholic.

A hallmark of Taize is that they pride themselves on not being bound to confessional ties. Are we violating the prescription of Canon 209 to maintain communion with the Church if we choose to participate in a movement that eschews confessional ties and seeks no formal union with the Church of Rome?

Can. 209 1. The Christian faithful, even in their own manner of acting, are always obliged to maintain communion with the Church.

The Church of God is to be understood as the Catholic Church. Are we truly leading others to the Catholic Faith if we work to promote a non-denominational, ecumenical movement?

The obligation of the faithful to know the Catholic Faith:

Can. 229 1. Lay persons are bound by the obligation and possess the right to acquire knowledge of Christian doctrine appropriate to the capacity and condition of each in order for them to be able to live according to this doctrine, announce it themselves, defend it if necessary, and take their part in exercising the apostolate.

This Canon would not prohibit Taize activities, but lends strength to the argument that it contributes little to teaching Catholic doctrine and that time could be better spent elsewhere. Taize seems to be a typical Prostestant group, seeking unity apart from adherence to the Catholic Faith.

Do I pray with non-Catholics? Yes, but I politely decline from attending their services any longer as I was insistingly pressured to denounce my Catholic Faith. My approach now is to invite them to Mass or a ministry event.
Jul 4th 2014 new
(quote) Vonnie-1082837 said: Not sure where to post this question. Moderator, please move it to the correct forum if it doesn't belong here.

Before I moved to my current location, I used to belong to a Taiz meditative prayer group in the parish. I would love to have one in my current parish and I wonder if someone could help me with some pointers. The books about Taiz mostly were more complicated that the one I used to.
scratchchin What or Who (in the world) is? Taiz? Never heard of Him or Her? (before my time) laughing laughing
Jul 4th 2014 new
The danger of the Ecumenical Movement is that will bring about the merging of all religions in the last days.
Jul 4th 2014 new
(quote) Nicole-1018166 said: The danger of the Ecumenical Movement is that will bring about the merging of all religions in the last days.
Thanks for your information.
Where I came from, almost all parishes has their own Taize prayer group, so I never thought it was frowned upon.
The format that I used to was almost like regular Mass but Taize style, even with homily and communion, since one of the parish's priest was always there with us. That's why I was confused that the Taize I found in English edition books are so much different.
I thought some forumers know this.

I like it because it is allowing me to meditate and center myself to Jesus teachings in quiet surroundings, lit only by candles around the cross, after hectic days of school/college/work.
And the repetitive songs were beautiful.

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