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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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I came upon this story today about this poor elephant, Raju, who had been beaten and shackled in chains and spikes for 50 years ( wide eyed sad !) until a special international rescue organization was able to raise the money and acquire the means to free this suffering, though majestic animal. It was said, that in the darkness of the the night as Raju's rescuers were cutting off his wretched manacles, the animal actually shed tears... This www.nydailynews.com
My question to you is, as a Catholic, what is our duty in the modern world to care for all God's creatures? Animals (beasts and fowls and creeping things as they are sometimes referred to) come up over and over in the Bible where it is revealed they exist for humans to use as "meat", and "beasts of burden" etc. But Genesis also tells us, "And God created the great whales, and every living and moving creature, which the waters brought forth, according to their kinds, and every winged fowl according to its kind. And God saw that it was good..." Other than personal pets, the atrocities brought forth upon other animals for our consumption and entertainment, and in more and more and more cases the extinction of God's creatures does not to me seem to be good at all rolling eyes .
And then from Job, "But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee: and the birds of the air, and they shall tell thee..." what will happen to our world, what is happening to our Faith, when we permit for so much of our society to overlook what these creatures can teach and tell us?
St. Paul tells us again in his epistle to Timothy, "For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be rejected that is received with thanksgiving." Are we overlooking, missing and ignoring that these creatures? Are we rejecting their importance, taking for granted their value, significance and the blessings the bestow upon us as keepers of this world? Are we truly giving thanks when thousands...millions, of animals are not even permitted to exist in the way God wanted for them to live but instead are used for our immediate, insatiable consumption and entertainment? Something tells me, not only how we treat others will determine our path to heaven, but too the way in which we tend to all God's creatures faint Dove

Jul 8th 2014 new
(quote) Mary-466498 said: I came upon this story today about this poor elephant, Raju, who had been beaten and shackled in chains and spikes for 50 years ( !) until a special international rescue organization was able to raise the money and acquire the means to free this suffering, though majestic animal. It was said, that in the darkness of the the night as Raju's rescuers were cutting off his wretched manacles, the animal actually shed tears... This http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/elephant-chained-50-years-cries-freed-india-article-1.1857195
My question to you is, as a Catholic, what is our duty in the modern world to care for all God's creatures? Animals (beasts and fowls and creeping things as they are sometimes referred to) come up over and over in the Bible where it is revealed they exist for humans to use as "meat", and "beasts of burden" etc. But Genesis also tells us, "And God created the great whales, and every living and moving creature, which the waters brought forth, according to their kinds, and every winged fowl according to its kind. And God saw that it was good..." Other than personal pets, the atrocities brought forth upon other animals for our consumption and entertainment, and in more and more and more cases the extinction of God's creatures does not to me seem to be good at all .
And then from Job, "But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee: and the birds of the air, and they shall tell thee..." what will happen to our world, what is happening to our Faith, when we permit for so much of our society to overlook what these creatures can teach and tell us?
St. Paul tells us again in his epistle to Timothy, "For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be rejected that is received with thanksgiving." Are we overlooking, missing and ignoring that these creatures? Are we rejecting their importance, taking for granted their value, significance and the blessings the bestow upon us as keepers of this world? Are we truly giving thanks when thousands...millions, of animals are not even permitted to exist in the way God wanted for them to live but instead are used for our immediate, insatiable consumption and entertainment? Something tells me, not only how we treat others will determine our path to heaven, but too the way in which we tend to all God's creatures

Mary, have you read any books by Temple Grandin? She is a famous autistic designer of animal slaughter facilities. I thought her books were mystical, no joking. Because of her autism she was able to think like animals and create a more peaceful and kind environment for them at the slaughterhouses.

Anyway, even though I am not a vegetarian I think we owe it to the animals to be kind. Jews today don't eat cheeseburgers because of the old testament laws that say not to boil a kid in its mother's milk, which I believe is telling us to use animals, but not to exploit them to the ultimate degree.
Jul 8th 2014 new
(quote) Mary-466498 said: I came upon this story today about this poor elephant, Raju, who had been beaten and shackled in chains and spikes for 50 years ( !) until a special international rescue organization was able to raise the money and acquire the means to free this suffering, though majestic animal. It was said, that in the darkness of the the night as Raju's rescuers were cutting off his wretched manacles, the animal actually shed tears... This http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/elephant-chained-50-years-cries-freed-india-article-1.1857195
My question to you is, as a Catholic, what is our duty in the modern world to care for all God's creatures? Animals (beasts and fowls and creeping things as they are sometimes referred to) come up over and over in the Bible where it is revealed they exist for humans to use as "meat", and "beasts of burden" etc. But Genesis also tells us, "And God created the great whales, and every living and moving creature, which the waters brought forth, according to their kinds, and every winged fowl according to its kind. And God saw that it was good..." Other than personal pets, the atrocities brought forth upon other animals for our consumption and entertainment, and in more and more and more cases the extinction of God's creatures does not to me seem to be good at all .
And then from Job, "But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee: and the birds of the air, and they shall tell thee..." what will happen to our world, what is happening to our Faith, when we permit for so much of our society to overlook what these creatures can teach and tell us?
St. Paul tells us again in his epistle to Timothy, "For every creature of God is good, and nothing to be rejected that is received with thanksgiving." Are we overlooking, missing and ignoring that these creatures? Are we rejecting their importance, taking for granted their value, significance and the blessings the bestow upon us as keepers of this world? Are we truly giving thanks when thousands...millions, of animals are not even permitted to exist in the way God wanted for them to live but instead are used for our immediate, insatiable consumption and entertainment? Something tells me, not only how we treat others will determine our path to heaven, but too the way in which we tend to all God's creatures

Hi Mary,
Your questions are interesting. What is your definition of a creature? Would you include insects to be counted as creatures too?
Jul 8th 2014 new
I treat humans as such, created in the image and likeness to God, alien and domestic, regardless of ethnicity or color of their skin. But all the other creatures I enjoy as well as on occasion eat, be it from surf or turf.
Jul 8th 2014 new
From the Catechism:

Respect for the integrity of creation

2415 The seventh commandment enjoins respect for the integrity of creation. Animals, like plants and inanimate beings, are by nature destined for the common good of past, present, and future humanity. Use of the mineral, vegetable, and animal resources of the universe cannot be divorced from respect for moral imperatives. Man's dominion over inanimate and other living beings granted by the Creator is not absolute; it is limited by concern for the quality of life of his neighbor, including generations to come; it requires a religious respect for the integrity of creation.

2416 Animals are God's creatures. He surrounds them with his providential care. By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory. Thus men owe them kindness. We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of Assisi or St. Philip Neri treated animals.

2417 God entrusted animals to the stewardship of those whom he created in his own image. Hence it is legitimate to use animals for food and clothing. They may be domesticated to help man in his work and leisure. Medical and scientific experimentation on animals is a morally acceptable practice if it remains within reasonable limits and contributes to caring for or saving human lives.

2418 It is contrary to human dignity to cause animals to suffer or die needlessly. It is likewise unworthy to spend money on them that should as a priority go to the relief of human misery. One can love animals; one should not direct to them the affection due only to persons.




__________
two cents - on a good day
Jul 8th 2014 new

I think humans need to have grave moral concern regarding the way animals are treated. God's love is intended for all of creation and its creatures - not just human beings. Sadly, humans commonly mistake their God-intended stewardship and partnership role for one of domination and exploitation. The example of a loving Creator should lead humans to act with kindness and respect toward animals. Inflicting pain in any living creature is incompatible with the love God intended. monkey


Jul 8th 2014 new
(quote) Carol-1007500 said:

I think humans need to have grave moral concern regarding the way animals are treated. God's love is intended for all of creation and its creatures - not just human beings. Sadly, humans commonly mistake their God-intended stewardship and partnership role for one of domination and exploitation. The example of a loving Creator should lead humans to act with kindness and respect toward animals. Inflicting pain in any living creature is incompatible with the love God intended.


True. On the other hand, letting a stray cat take over one's basement for four months is just stupid.
Jul 8th 2014 new
(quote) Paul-1049651 said: True. On the other hand, letting a stray cat take over one's basement for four months is just stupid.
Just goes to show that the cat was more sentient than you!
Jul 8th 2014 new
Not to hurt our humble brethren (the animals) is our first duty to them, but to stop there is not enough. We have a higher mission -- to be of service to them when they require it...If you have men who will exclude any of God's creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellowmen.

Saint Francis of Assisi

Jul 8th 2014 new
(quote) Susan-1048377 said: Mary, have you read any books by Temple Grandin? She is a famous autistic designer of animal slaughter facilities. I thought her books were mystical, no joking. Because of her autism she was able to think like animals and create a more peaceful and kind environment for them at the slaughterhouses.

Anyway, even though I am not a vegetarian I think we owe it to the animals to be kind. Jews today don't eat cheeseburgers because of the old testament laws that say not to boil a kid in its mother's milk, which I believe is telling us to use animals, but not to exploit them to the ultimate degree.
You know Susan, I never have read any of Temple Grandin's books though I am aware of who she is and a little bit about her...I know I saw an interview on some talk show with her once. I'd love to read her "mystical" books though! It sounds fascinating what you describe in terms of her creating "a more peaceful and kind environment" at slaughterhouses. Thank you for sharing.
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