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To veil or not to veil

Jul 22nd 2014 new
In a recent CM poll, the question of veils came up. As expected, the majority of women do not cover their heads in front of Jesus. The teaching from St. Paul is as follows:

For if a woman be not covered, let her be shorn. But if it be a shame to a woman to be shorn or made bald, let her cover her head. The man indeed ought not to cover his head, because he is the image and glory of God; but the woman is the glory of the man. For the man is not of the woman, but the woman of the man. For the man was not created for the woman, but the woman for the man. Therefore ought the woman to have a power over her head, because of the angels.

Now, I have 2 questions for the women on CM, and I put this is a public forum because I would love the men to also chime in.

1) Why do you/ don't you wear a veil?

2) Do you know Canon Law still requires veiling at Mass and by not doing so you are disobeying not only St. Paul, but the Catholic Church itself.

whatdoesthechurchteach.blogspot.com

"For 2,000 years, Catholic women have veiled themselves before entering a church or any time they are in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament. It was written into the 1917 Code of Canon Law, Canon 1262, that women must cover their heads -- "especially when they approach the holy table" ("mulieres autem, capite cooperto et modeste vestitae, maxime cum ad mensam Dominicam accedunt") -- but during the Second Vatican Council, Bugnini (the same *suspected* Freemason who designed the Novus Ordo Mass) was asked by journalists if women would still have to cover their heads. His reply, perhaps innocently enough, was that the issue was not being discussed. The journalists (as journalists are wont to do with Church teaching) took his answer as a "no," and printed their misinformation in newspapers all over the world. 1 Since then, many, if not most, Catholic women have lost the tradition.

After so many years of many women forgetting or positively repudiating the veil, clerics, not wanting to be confrontational or upset radical feminists, pretended the issue didn't exist. When the 1983 Code of Canon Law was produced, veiling was simply not mentioned (not abrogated, mind you, but simply not mentioned). However, Canons 20-21 of the 1983 Code of Canon Law make clear that later Canon Law abrogates earlier Canon Law only when this is made explicit and that, in cases of doubt, the revocation of earlier law is not to be presumed; quite the opposite:

Canon 20 A later law abrogates or derogates from an earlier law, if it expressly so states, or if it is directly contrary to that law, or if it integrally reorders the whole subject matter of the earlier law. A universal law, however, does not derogate from a particular or from a special law, unless the law expressly provides otherwise.

Canon 21 In doubt, the revocation of a previous law is not presumed; rather, later laws are to be related to earlier ones and, as far as possible, harmonized with them.
Canon 28 Without prejudice to the provisions of can. 5, a custom, whether contrary to or apart from the law, is revoked by a contrary custom or law. But unless the law makes express mention of them, it does not revoke centennial or immemorial customs, nor does a universal law revoke particular customs."

Now I present a challenge ladies. Wear a veil, just once and see how it changes your attitude, demeanor and reverence in front of our Lord. Notice how ladylike you feel and how pretty and womanly you look in it. St. Paul will not steer us wrong. He will lead us to Heaven.

God bless


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Jul 22nd 2014 new
Laura, I know several ladies between 20 and 40 who do make a point of wearing a veil or scarf or other head covering to Mass. To them it is a mark of reverence. When my daughter traveled in Europe, she quite happily wore a small lace veil or a scarf head covering when she entered a Church. All the ladies from Franciscan University Steubenville were so advised before spending a semester in Austria.
However, I believe this issue may be a case where applying the spirit of the law is better than sticking strictly to the letter of the law.
If I were to wear a veil to Church here in the Rochester NY area, it would draw undue attention to me. If the goal is to approach God in humility --not trying to distract others from worship, then not wearing a veil becomes acceptable.
Have you ever seen Churches where the ladies try to out do each other with their headgear? Even the name of those (in my opinion ridiculous) bits of feather and fabric worn at Prince William & Kate Middleton's wedding --fascinators-- tells you their intended purpose.
So, wear a veil if you like, and know that I honor your choice of expression. I'll remain bare-headed and fade into the crowd.
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Jul 22nd 2014 new
(quote) Laura-1101156 said:

Canon 28 Without prejudice to the provisions of can. 5, a custom, whether contrary to or apart from the law, is revoked by a contrary custom or law. But unless the law makes express mention of them, it does not revoke centennial or immemorial customs, nor does a universal law revoke particular customs."

Now I present a challenge ladies. Wear a veil, just once and see how it changes your attitude, demeanor and reverence in front of our Lord. Notice how ladylike you feel and how pretty and womanly you look in it. St. Paul will not steer us wrong. He will lead us to Heaven.

God bless


I suppose it's required to bow during the Nicene Creed, too, but hardly anyone does it -- because it's culturally alien to us as 21st century Americans to bow to anyone.

Traditions that don't affect belief, like headcoverings and liturgical dance, have to be aligned with the local culture, or they become irrelevant and weaken the belief system by arbitrary insistence on externals. How many tassels on my prayer shawl? Who cares, the important thing is, am I the Pharisee or the publican? scratchchin

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Jul 22nd 2014 new
(quote) Laura-1101156 said:

.Wear a veil, just once and see how it changes your attitude, demeanor and reverence in front of our Lord. Notice how ladylike you feel and how pretty and womanly you look in it.

Pretty?????
Only if I wear it over my face.

laughing

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Jul 22nd 2014 new
I don't. I've never thought it was required, and there're usually one or two ladies wear small laces on top of their heads at every Masses I attend.
Well, I've learned something new every day I spend reading posts in the forum. But I couldn't help thinking being Catholic is so complicated.
Isn't it enough to bring our weary self to an open invitation party God's wanting everyone to attend?
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Jul 22nd 2014 new
(quote) Laura-1101156 said: Now I present a challenge ladies. Wear a veil, just once and see how it changes your attitude, demeanor and reverence in front of our Lord. Notice how ladylike you feel and how pretty and womanly you look in it. St. Paul will not steer us wrong. He will lead us to Heaven.
Upon giving the veil a try, the only "change of attitude" I had was to focus more on myself and less on the Mass.

I don't have a problem with covering one's head, and in fact I was happy to do it while in Russia...because it was a matter of course. In the context of [many] American churches, it is not a matter of course, and it seems showy and out of place rather than humble. I'm not speaking of the TLM.

And I'm not convinced women are "disobeying" the Church for not wearing a veil to our regular Sunday Mass. If we're supposed to cover our heads, that should be made explicit, and we should not have to sift out implications in canon law in order to find that out. That just smacks of anxious legalism, to me.



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Jul 22nd 2014 new
(quote) Marge-938695 said:

I suppose it's required to bow during the Nicene Creed, too, but hardly anyone does it -- because it's culturally alien to us as 21st century Americans to bow to anyone.


Everyone at my church bows during the Nicene Creed.
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Jul 22nd 2014 new
There appear to be multiple quibbles with the interpretation of the Canon laws you refer to, by canon lawyers I respect immensely, like Ed Peters and Fr. John Z, not to mention Cardinal Raymond Burke.

canonlawblog.blogspot.com
www.canonlaw.info
www.ncregister.com

Let's not put an undue burden on our sisters to do something the Church does not require them to do but put it before them in a prayerful manner.

Having said that, I do in fact veil. it's something I had been considering for a time but knew I couldn't afford a veil that fit what I wanted. Then my friend Martina, founder of the Catholic Sistas blog (which is amazing, consider reading it some time!) held their one year anniversary give-away and encouraged me to sign up. I took a look at the prize list and decided there were only two things I was really interested in - a book that Jennifer Fulwiler and Hallie Lord had contributed to and a beautiful veil by another wonderful woman (Veils by Lily - consider her shop if you're thinking about veiling, they're high quality and beautiful). So I told God "Alright, you know I've been considering veiling but can't afford a nice veil. If you want me to do this, help me win that veil, and I'll start veiling."

Lo and behold, Martina contacted me about three weeks later and told me I'd won....the veil! Not only that, I was the second person who'd won it but she'd tried to contact the first person three times but never got ahold of them. I figured that was a pretty clear sign that I should start veiling.

I had considered veiling because other women I know who did said it made them feel more peaceful or more prayerful at Mass. I don't really get that sensation. What I do get, perhaps because I am a single woman, is the reminder that I am truly a bride of Christ and that every Mass is Christ's wedding feast. It's a very special feeling to walk down the aisle veiled to meet Jesus in the Eucharist. For that, I definitely think it's worth it.
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Jul 22nd 2014 new
Two links that didn't make it into my previous post

Jimmy Akin's thoughts on Cardinal Burke's statement - bit.ly
Another canon lawyer's thoughts on veiling - bit.ly
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Jul 22nd 2014 new
(quote) Pamela-880383 said: Let's not put an undue burden on our sisters to do something the Church does not require them to do but put it before them in a prayerful manner.
I agree, Pamela!

I'm glad that you were given a veil and that you've received grace through it. As hostile as my original post may have sounded, I hope someday I can wear a veil in an honest way, though at the moment I still find it to be more of a distraction than anything (personally, I mean -- not when other people wear it). God bless!


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