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This room is for those who have lost a spouse and need support or who can provide support to those who have.

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My 62 year old husband, who passed away suddenly and very unexpectantly in Sept. 1 1/2 years ago, had always told me that if he should die first, he wanted to be cremated and have his ashes scattered. He left me no resources for an expensive burial, so I did have his body cremated but I did not scatter his ashes, and I still have them at home. I returned to the Church after having been away for many years, and now I wonder if I did the wrong thing for my husband in the eyes of the Church. My husband had been baptized Catholic but did not support the Catholic Church. Any opinions?

05/27/2012 new

From #2301 in the attached link to the Catechism,

it would appear that cremation itself is not in

conflict with the teaching of the Church.

www.vatican.va

05/27/2012 new

As far as the Church, it's okay to have a loved-one cremated.


And, as far as your husband's wishes, I guess you would have to ask yourself how would you have felt if you ignored his wish to be cremated? Personally, I think you made the best choice by honoring your husband's wishes.


And, when the time is right for YOU, I am sure your heart will guide you what to do with his ashes. I don't think your husband gave you a "timeline" when you were to scatter his ashes. Possibly, talk to your parish priest and maybe this will help you, too. God Bless!

05/27/2012 new

Gwen, I am so sorry for your loss and that this has caused you distress as you have returned to the practice of your Catholic faith.

I agree with Teresa, you should talk to a priest at your parish.

But I also want to let you know that while cremation is permitted, your husband's cremains should be properly buried. The Order of Christian Funerals (OCF) states:[T]he practice of scattering cremated remains on the sea, from the air, or on the ground, or keeping cremated remains in the home of a relative or friend of the deceased are not the reverent disposition that the Church requires (OCF 416, emphasis added).

The interment of cremains is not very expensive, and if you are facing financial challenges, your diocese may even be able to provide you with financial assistance to bring your husband's cremains to a proper resting place in a Catholic cemetery.

God bless you, and I hope you will complete these final steps for this work of mercy for your dear husband (one of the corporal works of mercy is to bury the dead). Praying

05/28/2012 new

(Quote) Pat-5351 said: Gwen, I am so sorry for your loss and that this has caused you distress as you have returned to the p...
(Quote) Pat-5351 said:

Gwen, I am so sorry for your loss and that this has caused you distress as you have returned to the practice of your Catholic faith.

I agree with Teresa, you should talk to a priest at your parish.

But I also want to let you know that while cremation is permitted, your husband's cremains should be properly buried. The Order of Christian Funerals (OCF) states:[T]he practice of scattering cremated remains on the sea, from the air, or on the ground, or keeping cremated remains in the home of a relative or friend of the deceased are not the reverent disposition that the Church requires (OCF 416, emphasis added).

The interment of cremains is not very expensive, and if you are facing financial challenges, your diocese may even be able to provide you with financial assistance to bring your husband's cremains to a proper resting place in a Catholic cemetery.

God bless you, and I hope you will complete these final steps for this work of mercy for your dear husband (one of the corporal works of mercy is to bury the dead).

--hide--

Gwen - I am sorry for your loss. We buried my grandparents cremains in the family plot when another member died. There was no additional cost, and we had a place to visit even without a headstone.


Kevin and Pat - thank you for the information. I was fairly certain that cremation was not an issue, but was unaware of the burial requirement.

Anne Marie


05/29/2012 new

(Quote) Teresa-525463 said: As far as the Church, it's okay to have a loved-one cremated.And, as far as your...
(Quote) Teresa-525463 said:

As far as the Church, it's okay to have a loved-one cremated.


And, as far as your husband's wishes, I guess you would have to ask yourself how would you have felt if you ignored his wish to be cremated? Personally, I think you made the best choice by honoring your husband's wishes.


And, when the time is right for YOU, I am sure your heart will guide you what to do with his ashes. I don't think your husband gave you a "timeline" when you were to scatter his ashes. Possibly, talk to your parish priest and maybe this will help you, too. God Bless!

--hide--


It's my understanding that the church requires that ashes be interred. It's not allowable to have them scattered.


To the OP, It's a little late to be in a state of guilt over whether you did the right thing, so it seems to me that you need to let it go now..

05/30/2012 new

(Quote) Donna-83441 said: ... To the OP, It's a little late to be in a state of guilt over whether you did the right thi...
(Quote) Donna-83441 said:

... To the OP, It's a little late to be in a state of guilt over whether you did the right thing ...

--hide--

It's only about 9:30 in Reno. smile

05/30/2012 new

Besides,


of doing the wrong thing,


the


fear and loathing


is reserved for Las Vegas.


05/30/2012 new

Gwen, my sincerest sympathies on the loss of your beloved.

When Christ returns, He will have no problem re-assembling your husbands ashes into his glorified body. He is God after all. biggrin

05/30/2012 new

Well said Joanna

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