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Saint Vitus is the patron saint of actors, comedians, dancers, and of entertainers in general.
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Aug 2nd 2012 new

(Quote) Dawn-58330 said: Hi Carlos. I have an English Literature degree, so my reading habits cover a vast array of...
(Quote) Dawn-58330 said:

Hi Carlos.

I have an English Literature degree, so my reading habits cover a vast array of the Dewey Decimal System.

I do like Sci-fi, though I go through phases. Orson Scott Card is one of my favorite authors. I love the Enders series. I do think his books are helpful. They raise pertanent moral questions. I recommended them to my teenage students.

I also like Asimov, Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, Robert Jordan, Rod Sterling, Madeleine L'Engle, Ursula LeGuin, and several others. I think Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games series raises some very timely questions for us to ponder.

I could go on. And then there is the field of sci-fi television and movies. George Lucas and Gene Roddenberry have made a huge impact on our culture. They were visionaries with their Star Wars and Star Trek series. Stargate and Babylon5 have touched on much of their work. Lucas' stories are very archetypal, which means they contain profound truths.

Ultimately any good story is really an imitation of the Greatest Story Ever Told. I believe there is a lot of our faith covered in really good sci-fi. Sci-fi tends to be visionary-- it explores where we could be going as a society. The world building that writers do in sci-fi is for the purpose of taking the societal issues of our day out of the context of our culture and placing them in foreign worlds so that we can see things better. The writers I mentioned have done that, which is why I enjoy their work.

As for a social stigma... There is one??? I guess I have so many friends, writers and readers, who are avid readers of sci-fi-- far more than I am-- that I just see it as equal billing as mystery, adventure, horror, and romance. It's all fiction-- some of it good and some bad.
--hide--

I don't want to be repetitive, so I'll just say I agree with what Dawn said!

Aug 2nd 2012 new

(Quote) Amie-451961 said: Ok, I'll answer. I like fantasy/sci-fi though I tend to be more fantasy then sci-fi. These stories ar...
(Quote) Amie-451961 said: Ok, I'll answer. I like fantasy/sci-fi though I tend to be more fantasy then sci-fi. These stories are fundemental in our nature an act very much like the ancient myths did. They offer us insight and a framework from which we can examine ourselves and society from a different viewpoint. But, most importantly they are fun. Imaginging the flight of Icarus or fighting Medusa or riding a unicorn or flying a spaceship is just all good fun.

So

1-of course I do, unless someone wants to catagorize me and a million other adults who enjoy them as children

2-I think there is stigma attached almost anytime people think others are "too passionate" about anything. Plus reading is not super popular and people who tend to read these genres are super readers, so out of step with the rest of the world

3-yes

Anyways my two cents so you wouldn't feel alone loving these fun genres. There are many others.
--hide--


Hi Amie!


nice to meet you. Your response was really well elaborated. The way you link myth with these stories is so true. People who don't like or understand them, usually stay in the surface, and can therefore only see the laser gun fights and guy with pointy ears speaking werid languages. I've learned that people will always judge and belittle what they don't understand. I was raised in a country(Costa Rica), where people who still like Star Wars when they grow up and are passionate about it are not considered "mature", and well for the ladies department is a red flag! It's funny how in highschool and early college years I was considered a jock, bc I was much into sports and was very muscular and that. Now I'm a geek bc Im much into science(environment) and sci-fi fantasy. Those same people are the ones who have stayed the same( drinking, sleeping around with other people etc). I've also been tagged as weid bc of my faith(even by women). Anyway, it's good to know there are other people who like this.


I hope I can soon publish my science fantasy stories so you can enjoy them too! I've worked on them for so many years every single day, it's about time haha.

Aug 2nd 2012 new

(Quote) Dawn-58330 said: Hi Carlos. I have an English Literature degree, so my reading habits cover a vast array of...
(Quote) Dawn-58330 said:

Hi Carlos.

I have an English Literature degree, so my reading habits cover a vast array of the Dewey Decimal System.

I do like Sci-fi, though I go through phases. Orson Scott Card is one of my favorite authors. I love the Enders series. I do think his books are helpful. They raise pertanent moral questions. I recommended them to my teenage students.

I also like Asimov, Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, Robert Jordan, Rod Sterling, Madeleine L'Engle, Ursula LeGuin, and several others. I think Suzanne Collins' Hunger Games series raises some very timely questions for us to ponder.

I could go on. And then there is the field of sci-fi television and movies. George Lucas and Gene Roddenberry have made a huge impact on our culture. They were visionaries with their Star Wars and Star Trek series. Stargate and Babylon5 have touched on much of their work. Lucas' stories are very archetypal, which means they contain profound truths.

Ultimately any good story is really an imitation of the Greatest Story Ever Told. I believe there is a lot of our faith covered in really good sci-fi. Sci-fi tends to be visionary-- it explores where we could be going as a society. The world building that writers do in sci-fi is for the purpose of taking the societal issues of our day out of the context of our culture and placing them in foreign worlds so that we can see things better. The writers I mentioned have done that, which is why I enjoy their work.

As for a social stigma... There is one??? I guess I have so many friends, writers and readers, who are avid readers of sci-fi-- far more than I am-- that I just see it as equal billing as mystery, adventure, horror, and romance. It's all fiction-- some of it good and some bad.
--hide--


Hi Dawn!


thanks for your post. Much appreciated! I've also read Ender's Game. I liked the story, I just didn't like the vocabulary the children used and violence. Sure it serves a purpose, but for someone as great as Scott Card,whom I admire from his "How to write" books, I would have liked a more poetic language. That's something I've noticed about Star Wars for example. The kind of language used can be read but not spoken outloud. It keeps you suspended in that universe. The same goes with Lord of the Rings: you feel that you're not in this world.


As I said before, there is either a social stigma, or I've had very bad luck. Besides all of you who have responded to my post and another Cm member I write to, have been the only women who seem to enjoy this. The most I've gotten from a woman has been to talk about Twilight. I'm not the greatest fan of this story, but I still like it. But when you mention spaceships, and laser guns, they look at you as if you were a Martian. I think I should find a woman who likes this, or at least is so smart that she can tolerate it, or at least see how important those stories are.


I'm currently correcting a science fantasy novel I wrote, and in order to make it as good as possible, I've had to research from the common sci-fi and fantasy lore( Dune, Foundation, Star Wars, Narnia, LOTR) to mythology(Nibelungen, Beowulf, King Arthur, Theogony, Edda), to history( from the battles of Thermopolis to Stalingrad and beyond), to astronomy and other sciences. I happen to be an avid reader ofthe classics. I just reread the Illiad, am now reading Dicken's A tale of two cities and Pride and Prejudice. Not long ago I watched Wagner's Ring of the Nibelungen Opera and Shakespeare's Macbeth by Orson Welles.

I had a question for you Dawn: Do you think that in order to be a good writer you necessarily need the degree you have? I previously majored in microbiology and am now specializing in Environmental Management. English is not my mother tongue, but I've showed my stories to several people, and they like them so far. What would you say?

Aug 2nd 2012 new
(Quote) Carlos-876737 said: I had a question for you Dawn: Do you think that in order to be a good writer you necessarily ...
(Quote) Carlos-876737 said:



I had a question for you Dawn: Do you think that in order to be a good writer you necessarily need the degree you have? I previously majored in microbiology and am now specializing in Environmental Management. English is not my mother tongue, but I've showed my stories to several people, and they like them so far. What would you say?



--hide--


No, of course not. I don't think you need a literature degree or even a creative writing degree to be a good writer. In fact I would say that most good writers do not have a formal background in literature. I have it because I wanted to be a teacher, and my passion for storytelling led me to being a literature teacher (for awhile, but not now.) Michael Crichton (Jurassic Park, et al) had no background in literature (his was medical). Tom Clancy (Hunt For Red October) was in the military.

I am impressed with your skill with the English language. As an American who only speaks English, I woefully inept at communicating well with other cultures.

I am a fiction writer as well, but I don't write sci-fi. I read it, study it, but the Muse does not direct me to write science fiction or fantasy. My science fiction interest stems from the scientific influence of my immediate family members who are chemists. My fantasy interest comes from my own girly dreamy mind.
Aug 3rd 2012 new
I am wondering if something is true. My brother and I both read this genre but with completely opposing strategies. I skim any fight scene or discussion of weapons or details of strategy so I can more quickly get to all the other parts(the journey, the relationships, the personal dilemmas) and my brother skims everything else so he can more quickly get to the battle scenes. Is this a common difference between male and female readers of the genre?

I feel that a good sci-fi book could be written without a laser gun or space battle in sight. Arguments for or against? What is necessary and what is just a prop?

My personal fantasy world is somewhere between Narnia, Middle Earth, and Arrakis. Favorite novelist Diana Wynne Jones.
Aug 3rd 2012 new

(Quote) Amie-451961 said: I am wondering if something is true. My brother and I both read this genre but with completely opposing s...
(Quote) Amie-451961 said: I am wondering if something is true. My brother and I both read this genre but with completely opposing strategies. I skim any fight scene or discussion of weapons or details of strategy so I can more quickly get to all the other parts(the journey, the relationships, the personal dilemmas) and my brother skims everything else so he can more quickly get to the battle scenes. Is this a common difference between male and female readers of the genre?

I feel that a good sci-fi book could be written without a laser gun or space battle in sight. Arguments for or against? What is necessary and what is just a prop?

My personal fantasy world is somewhere between Narnia, Middle Earth, and Arrakis. Favorite novelist Diana Wynne Jones.
--hide--


Amie,


I understand what you mean. I think there needs to be a balance of both. If you only have intrihgue you get a soap opera. Too much battle and you get a Stallone or Schwarzenegger movie. I personally never liked Rambo because there was too much action and killing, and not dialogue. I think battles are important as a way to show conflict as well. Words can be as hurtful as guns however. The stories that I'm writing right now, I've tried to change that a bit and balance it as well. Battles take place, but there's a "faction" who wants to kill the enemy and another who wants to heal it. So you have two kinds of battle. I was inspired by the conflict between organic and common agriculture. One type wants balance and accepts biodiversity(use of microorganisms to recycle nutrients and balance out pests), while the other doesn't(pesticide aplication) Also, I've developed a love triangle and other complex interactions between many characters. I've had to read Dickens, and Austen and Dumas for example, in order to achieve that. I like both. I enjoy a good epic battle, but also intrigue. I think that the advantage of writing and reading in this genre provides you with a palette of things to taste. You've action, romance, mythology, history, science, comic relief, etc. So many elements all at once!

Aug 3rd 2012 new

Amie and Dawn,


what do you think of Star Wars for example? I mean that's space fantasy. There are more fairy tale elements and mythology than science fiction there. In fact, if you analyze it scientifically it has so many wrong things. Like there is no sound in space. That is a classic. But the mythological part is there. Isn't there a way that women(or most of them) can get passed the superficial hi tech jargon such as "plug the professor into the hyperdrive"? I mean the lightsaber is so cool. Don't you like it when a jedi ignites it and brushes it against the air, while you can hear it humming before you? I think that one can appreciate that as a child appreciates new things. Just the power to marvel at things.


I don't know I maybe weird. I happen to watch chickflicks too. I mean what guy watches movies like sixteen candles, Clueless, twilight and such? What about more mature stories like the Notebook, Message in a bottle and Bridges of Madison County? I even have Gone with the Wind and Out of Africa on DVD? I'm reading Pride and Prejudice and I can fully identify with Mr. Darc(I happen to have a similar personality haha). I really don't care if other guys think I have less testosterone. haha jk. I just like the stories, for it is ultimately about the human tragedy, as Pope Benedict once said when someone asked him what music he liked. He said his favorite composer was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, because of that. I think it is about taking the journey with the character. Whether that is in a car, a spaceship or a horse, it's the same with me. I just happen to like inmersing my mind in fantastic worlds. Space is the last frontier, and to have characters traveling from one planet to another discovering other life forms while gazing at the stars, it just enhances my imagination.

Aug 3rd 2012 new
I loved seeing C.S. Lewis' work brought alive through film! I really hope they continue to create a movie for each fantasy novel in The Chronicles of Narnia series.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - www.youtube.com

Prince Caspian - www.youtube.com

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader - www.youtube.com
Aug 4th 2012 new

(Quote) Mary-486033 said: I loved seeing C.S. Lewis' work brought alive through film! I really hope they continue to create a m...
(Quote) Mary-486033 said: I loved seeing C.S. Lewis' work brought alive through film! I really hope they continue to create a movie for each fantasy novel in The Chronicles of Narnia series.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - www.youtube.com

Prince Caspian - www.youtube.com

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader - www.youtube.com
--hide--

Hi Mary,


they should have started with The Magician's nephew. For me that's the best Narnia novel. You don't only get to see how Narnia was created, but also the character Polly is sweet and real.....I think I've never seen a better characterization of a little girl. She has both wits and sensibility :0)

Aug 4th 2012 new
(Quote) Carlos-876737 said: (Quote) Mary-486033 said: I loved seeing C.S. Lewis' work brought alive through film! I re...
(Quote) Carlos-876737 said:

Quote:
Mary-486033 said: I loved seeing C.S. Lewis' work brought alive through film! I really hope they continue to create a movie for each fantasy novel in The Chronicles of Narnia series.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - www.youtube.com

Prince Caspian - www.youtube.com

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader - www.youtube.com





Hi Mary,




they should have started with The Magician's nephew. For me that's the best Narnia novel. You don't only get to see how Narnia was created, but also the character Polly is sweet and real.....I think I've never seen a better characterization of a little girl. She has both wits and sensibility :0)

--hide--
Well, you're in luck because rumor has it that The Magician's Nephew is supposed to be next.

However, one problem with the speculation. The Narnia website was taken down. Just redirects you to facebook. Hope it doesn't mean they buried plans for the remaining novels.
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