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This room is for discussion for anyone who adheres to the Extraordinary form of the mass and any issues related to the practices of Eastern Rite Catholicism.

Saint Athanasius is counted as one of the four Great Doctors of the Church.
Learn More:Saint Athanasius

Nov 30th 2012 new

"I understand clearly that through love alone can we become pleasing to God, and my sole ambition is to acquire it."


- St. Therese of Lisieux

Nov 30th 2012 new

(Quote) Jim-388330 said: Brothers and sisters I just wanted to share these thoughts with you, largely taken from Father this...
(Quote) Jim-388330 said:

Brothers and sisters I just wanted to share these thoughts with you, largely taken from Father this afternoon at Mass. So often you and I tend to meet people in the secular world who often tell us we should be more open minded and that actually holding to our own beliefs somehow makes us inferior to them (close-minded). Holding to a set of values naturally means we have to reject others. The truth is that regardless of the state in life we're in, we all practice selective hearing. If we didn't we would go insane and we wouldn't be able to function.


In fact when we hear people ask us to be open minded, what it actually does is close our minds to objective truth. "Keep an open mind" is used as a battle cry for moral relativists, because in the end, what they wish you to do is to recognize any position to have equal value. But the moment you ask if his position of equivilency should be considered true, they cannot answer. To do so would no longer make him a moral relativist.


So the moment anybody asks you to be more open minded about (for example) not attending mass every Sunday, you may want to ask them to be more open minded to what the Church actually teaches, like you know, going to Mass every Sunday to give respect and honor to our Lord, and receive him in the most blessed sacrament, and besides, it helps fulfill the third commandment.


Any similar situations?


God bless,


Jim

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Rules? Values? Not important because they're made by "old men" who don't know about the "real" world"? How often have we heard about those. The Church's rules.....values.....are so restrictive.

If we look at the Church in the role of a parent, we may come to understand it better. What happens during childhood when a youngster is in his/her formative years? Don't parents impose restrictions and rules concerning their children's behavior? Is this cruel? Mean? Close-minded? Or....is it because parents truly care about their children's lives and want them to be safe for one thing, and grow up to be responsible adults in society.

On Relevant Radio yesterday, a person spoke about sexual behavior, or rather misbehavior. She pointed out, as an example of consequences of our misdeeds, that before the so-called "sexual revolution" there were only 5 sexually related diseases. With our so-called "liberation" there are now over 30 -- many of which are incurable and will last a lifetime. Do we really want to brag about having an open mind? Just exactly what gets dumped into this open mind's space? "Garbage in; garbage out."

We will always have rules if we are to survive. The Church's rules pertain to spiritual survival -- the ultimate goal. The Church is a loving "parent" trying to ensure that Her children are saved, and that they follow the Good Lord's Commandments during their lifetime.

Isn't it a good feeling to know you have Someone looking after you?

Nov 30th 2012 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: More important than an open-mind is an open heart. The more we love, the more we see others as God sees ...
(Quote) David-364112 said: More important than an open-mind is an open heart. The more we love, the more we see others as God sees them, the less likely we are to dispute and the more likely they are to come around to seeing things in a better like - not through our powers of persuasion, but by the love and dignity we accord them.

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thumbsup hug Anne-Marie and David, you have both eloquently addressed the core idea here--having an "open heart" is the WAY...Dear Blessed Mother Theresa gave such a good example of this--patterning her open arms to others, just as Christ did. There is sooo much to love in this world of sin, and we are called to shine our own example of Jesus's love for all. I sure hope the people I meet in life will look beyond my failings to see the "Christ" that is within me. angel

Nov 30th 2012 new

"You will be surprised to find in Paradise souls you never expected to be there."


- St. Padre Pio



Nov 30th 2012 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: "You will be surprised to find in Paradise souls you never expected to be there."...
(Quote) David-364112 said:

"You will be surprised to find in Paradise souls you never expected to be there."


- St. Padre Pio

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So totally true!

Nov 30th 2012 new

(Quote) Marirose-887295 said: So totally true!
(Quote) Marirose-887295 said:


So totally true!

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we need to stay humble.

Nov 30th 2012 new

[quote]David-364112 said:


we need to stay humble.

Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it's thinking of yourself less.
Rick Warren

It was pride that changed angels into devils; it is humility that makes men as angels.
Saint Augustine

Nov 30th 2012 new

May your sermon be continual self-sacrifice; be discreet wherever you go and be like the smile of God.


- St. Padre Pio


Actions. Not words, but action and interior disposition.

Nov 30th 2012 new

edwardfeser.blogspot.com

The cardinal virtues are wisdom, courage, moderation, and justice. They are so called because they are traditionally regarded as the “hinge” (cardo) on which the rest of morality turns. We find them discussed in Plato’s Republicand given a more given systematic exposition in Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae.

For Plato, these virtues are related to the three main parts of the soul and the corresponding three main classes in his ideal city. Wisdom is the characteristic virtue of the highest part of the soul -- the rational part -- and of the highest class within the city, the ruling philosopher-kings. Courage is the characteristic virtue of the middle, spirited part of the soul, and of the soldiers who constitute the second main class in the city. Moderation is the characteristic attribute of the lowest, desiring part of the soul and of the lowest, productive class of the city. Justice in turn is the proper ordering of the three parts of the soul and the city, each doing its part.

When reason is in charge and the spirited part of the soul -- the part driven by a sense of honor and shame -- is doing reason’s bidding in keeping down the desiring part of the soul, allowing its appetites to be indulged only when reason dictates, the soul is just. And when the philosopher-kings -- those motivated by a rational, disinterested pursuit of the good of the city -- are in charge of the city, the soldiers following their lead in governing the city, and the productive class focusing their attention on that to which they are best suited (farming, building, craftsmanship, and the like), the city is just. Injustice is a deviation from this order -- the spirited part or the desiring part dominating the soul, or the soldiers or productive class dominating the government of the city.

Plato’s famous analysis of the four main types of unjust regime develops this theme. A timocracy or honor-oriented society puts the military virtues ahead of reason. This is disordered, but still the least bad form of unjust city in Plato’s view, since at least it is an objective and non-appetitive standard -- the will to pursue what is honorable and avoid what is shameful -- that is idealized. An oligarchy or money-oriented society is worse, because it is driven by the appetitive part of the soul, but it is still not the worstkind of regime, since the pursuer of wealth must at least puts chains on his appetites to some extent, respecting bourgeois values like thrift and long-term thinking. Democracy, as Plato understands it, is worse still, since it effectively puts the lowest appetites in charge. Like the never-satisfied and competing impulses toward food, sex, and drink that dominate a degenerate individual soul, a democratic society is dominated by the same impulses, and its social life and politics are chaotic, characterized by passing fads and resistant to the idea that there might be any permanent and objective standard against which the fads and impulses might be judged. Tyranny, the worst kind of regime, is essentially what results when a particular democratic soul, driven by especially strong appetites, imposes its will on the rest. This analysis and its relevance to modern politics and culture deserve a write-up of their own, but for the moment let’s consider the fate of the cardinal virtues in a modern democratic society. The words “wisdom,” “courage,” “moderation,”and “justice” are certainly not absent in such societies. To some extent the content of the traditional virtues is even respected -- democratic citizens will approve of the courage they read about in military history or see portrayed in movies like Saving Private Ryan, will commend moderation where overindulgence might affect bodily health, and so forth. But much more prominent than the cardinal virtues -- and to a large extent coloring the conception democratic man has of the content of the cardinal virtues -- are certain other character traits, such as open-mindedness,empathy, tolerance, and fairness. The list will be familiar, since the language of these “virtues” permeates contemporary pop culture and politics, and it can be said to constitute a kind of counterpoint to the traditional cardinal virtues. And in each case the counter-virtue entails a turn of just the sort one might expect given Plato’s analysis of democracy -- from the objective to the subjective, from a focus on the way things actually are to a focus on the way one believes or desires them to be. Hence wisdom, as a Plato or Aquinas conceives of it, is outward-oriented, involving a grasp of objective truth in the speculative and practical spheres. Open-mindedness, by contrast, is oriented inwardly, toward the subjective, concerned not with objective reality itself so much as with a willingness to consider alternative views about objective reality. ...
Nov 30th 2012 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: Actions. Not words, but action and interior disposition.
(Quote) David-364112 said:

Actions. Not words, but action and interior disposition.

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Interior disposition! God knows the heart - we cannot hide it from him.

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