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Those darn Protestants

Nov 23rd 2012 new
My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to steer clear of arguments but they always pick a fight with me over catholic prayers, the way we celebrate, our Bible translations, etc... I am sick of it! Why can't they just learn to keep their mouths shut? I don't point out the speck in their eyes or how "messed up" some of them are. Ugh, just venting...happy Thanksgiving weekend! :)
Nov 23rd 2012 new
(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to
(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to
--hide--


Well this is a good place to vent! ;) I'm not sure what your job exactly is. But try to make clear that you want to seperate your personal life from your worklife. I don't know what it is that you might trigger in them that they feel they need to pick a fight with you? But keep those bounderies clear for them and also for yourself.
Nov 23rd 2012 new

I have more Protestant friends then Catholic ones. In my experience it is about boundaries and respecting each other.

Nov 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to steer clear of arguments but they ...
(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to steer clear of arguments but they always pick a fight with me over catholic prayers, the way we celebrate, our Bible translations, etc... I am sick of it! Why can't they just learn to keep their mouths shut? I don't point out the speck in their eyes or how "messed up" some of them are. Ugh, just venting...happy Thanksgiving weekend! :)
--hide--
Patience, Khoa, patience. These Protestants of whom you speak are sister and brother Christians -- God's children,as we all are. Many, if not most, were born into their faiths, just as we were. It's difficult to change something that's been engrained in you since leaving the womb.

Arguments? Not going to solve or resolve much. Discussions? If both sides can respect each other's beliefs, whether they're right or wrong, that's an accomplishment. Tolerance on both sides helps. In nearly all cases, we collectively are worshiping the same God, following the same 10 Commandments, and trying to do the best we can morally. That means we have much in common with our Christian brethren -- even Jewish because that's where our roots are.

Listen patiently, learn from them. One-upmanship isn't going to work. Think of this as a challenge for you to brush up on your own Faith. In your role as a lay chaplain iin a diverse setting, it isn't you responsibility to resolve hair-splitting doctrinal issues. Think about your job description -- to bring comfort to those in need, and see to it that their spiritual needs are met. You can play the role of evangelist (which is our calling) by setting an example, and helping your patients (which I believe you are doing).

In an atmosphere that doesn't lend itself to lengthy theological discussions about who is right and who is wrong, you can state your beliefs, and why you accept them. This doesn't need to lead to a debate or argument. Doing this will take some practice, finesse, tact and diplomacy. Remember that you can't force your beliefs on anyone -- Jesus Himself didn't do that. We're certainly not able to fill His shoes (or sandals to be correct).

We just do the best we can.

Nov 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to steer clear of arguments but they ...
(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to steer clear of arguments but they always pick a fight with me over catholic prayers, the way we celebrate, our Bible translations, etc... I am sick of it! Why can't they just learn to keep their mouths shut? I don't point out the speck in their eyes or how "messed up" some of them are. Ugh, just venting...happy Thanksgiving weekend! :)
--hide--


Happy Thanksgiving. I am sure that if you pulled out all the stops you could easily put them in their place. If I were in your shoes I would probably tell them thatthe workplace is not a good place fort those discussions.

I would set that boundary and if they wanted to discuss it after work only then, maybe would I. If you are dealing with little comments made by them, tell them it is not prudent to make or be forced to receive comments like that in the workplace. It is a kind of bigotry, but don't tell them that. Tell them it is inappropriate at work.

Nov 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: (Quote) Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestant...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

Quote:
Khoa-813439 said: My job requires that I work with peers who are Protestants. I tried to steer clear of arguments but they always pick a fight with me over catholic prayers, the way we celebrate, our Bible translations, etc... I am sick of it! Why can't they just learn to keep their mouths shut? I don't point out the speck in their eyes or how "messed up" some of them are. Ugh, just venting...happy Thanksgiving weekend! :)

Patience, Khoa, patience. These Protestants of whom you speak are sister and brother Christians -- God's children,as we all are. Many, if not most, were born into their faiths, just as we were. It's difficult to change something that's been engrained in you since leaving the womb.

Arguments? Not going to solve or resolve much. Discussions? If both sides can respect each other's beliefs, whether they're right or wrong, that's an accomplishment. Tolerance on both sides helps. In nearly all cases, we collectively are worshiping the same God, following the same 10 Commandments, and trying to do the best we can morally. That means we have much in common with our Christian brethren -- even Jewish because that's where our roots are.

Listen patiently, learn from them. One-upmanship isn't going to work. Think of this as a challenge for you to brush up on your own Faith. In your role as a lay chaplain iin a diverse setting, it isn't you responsibility to resolve hair-splitting doctrinal issues. Think about your job description -- to bring comfort to those in need, and see to it that their spiritual needs are met. You can play the role of evangelist (which is our calling) by setting an example, and helping your patients (which I believe you are doing).

In an atmosphere that doesn't lend itself to lengthy theological discussions about who is right and who is wrong, you can state your beliefs, and why you accept them. This doesn't need to lead to a debate or argument. Doing this will take some practice, finesse, tact and diplomacy. Remember that you can't force your beliefs on anyone -- Jesus Himself didn't do that. We're certainly not able to fill His shoes (or sandals to be correct).

We just do the best we can.

--hide--


I am always aware at work of what is truly a good use of my time when I am on the clock. Be aware of that and don't let these people take your attention over to such things. Also ray has mentioned a good way to look at it. Don't let them provoke you to fight. It is not a good practice to fight(verbally) with anyone at work.

Nov 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: Patience, Khoa, patience. These Protestants of whom you speak are sister and brother Christians -- ...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

Patience, Khoa, patience. These Protestants of whom you speak are sister and brother Christians -- God's children,as we all are. Many, if not most, were born into their faiths, just as we were. It's difficult to change something that's been engrained in you since leaving the womb.

Arguments? Not going to solve or resolve much. Discussions? If both sides can respect each other's beliefs, whether they're right or wrong, that's an accomplishment. Tolerance on both sides helps. In nearly all cases, we collectively are worshiping the same God, following the same 10 Commandments, and trying to do the best we can morally. That means we have much in common with our Christian brethren -- even Jewish because that's where our roots are.

Listen patiently, learn from them. One-upmanship isn't going to work. Think of this as a challenge for you to brush up on your own Faith. In your role as a lay chaplain iin a diverse setting, it isn't you responsibility to resolve hair-splitting doctrinal issues. Think about your job description -- to bring comfort to those in need, and see to it that their spiritual needs are met. You can play the role of evangelist (which is our calling) by setting an example, and helping your patients (which I believe you are doing).

In an atmosphere that doesn't lend itself to lengthy theological discussions about who is right and who is wrong, you can state your beliefs, and why you accept them. This doesn't need to lead to a debate or argument. Doing this will take some practice, finesse, tact and diplomacy. Remember that you can't force your beliefs on anyone -- Jesus Himself didn't do that. We're certainly not able to fill His shoes (or sandals to be correct).

We just do the best we can.

--hide--
I agree with Ray. Often you are closer to each others beliefs in some areas then you realize. Focus on what you have in common. Pray for understanding for both you and them. I dont feel the need to explain my position unless they ask about it. It helps a lot with inter faith relationships. I find other religions interesting.

Nov 23rd 2012 new
I don't think you understand my position. I never fight with anyone nor do I shove the catholic faith down anyone's throat. I am very reserved and respectful of everyone's tradition. The problem here is with these people who do not like Catholics in the first place! They will say anything to get under my skin or to get me lose my temper...so far I picked my battle and ignore their negative attacks BUT at the same time I'm very firm in what I say to them...we're not a carpet for people to trample upon.
Nov 23rd 2012 new
(Quote) Sally-894891 said: Well this is a good place to vent! ;) I'm not sure what your job exactly is. But try to make clear tha...
(Quote) Sally-894891 said:

Well this is a good place to vent! ;) I'm not sure what your job exactly is. But try to make clear that you want to seperate your personal life from your worklife. I don't know what it is that you might trigger in them that they feel they need to pick a fight with you? But keep those bounderies clear for them and also for yourself.
--hide--


Thanks Sally, I definitely will!
Nov 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: I don't think you understand my position. I never fight with anyone nor do I shove the catholic faith...
(Quote) Khoa-813439 said: I don't think you understand my position. I never fight with anyone nor do I shove the catholic faith down anyone's throat. I am very reserved and respectful of everyone's tradition. The problem here is with these people who do not like Catholics in the first place! They will say anything to get under my skin or to get me lose my temper...so far I picked my battle and ignore their negative attacks BUT at the same time I'm very firm in what I say to them...we're not a carpet for people to trample upon.
--hide--



Khoa, can you give an example of what you are talking about?

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