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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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Dec 8th 2012 new

(Quote) Steven-706921 said: a). That's indeed a relief to hear. b). No, not really.
(Quote) Steven-706921 said:

a). That's indeed a relief to hear.

b). No, not really.

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Did you watch the video about the cop talking about the weapon? That was the first time I ever heard that.

Dec 9th 2012 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: www.necn.com.
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:





www.necn.comblockID=811359&feedID=11106

This is an interesting story about a German Gun from WW2 turned in during a routine Gun Buy Back at a
Hartford, Ct. police station.

The gun is apparently worth between $30,000 and $40,000 and turned in by a woman.

The interesting part, I thought, is the description of how the woman could have come into possession
of that gun.ding officer allowed you to, you could send home a weapon, after you
killed someone.

He leaves some things out though. I think he means that the American serviceman, after killing a
German in possesion of a weapon, would be allowed to send home the German's weapon, with permission from
his commanding officer.

Has anyone else heard about this? One would think there would be a lot more German guns floating
around the US if that was the case.

Also, in the video, the officer says the serviceman could have brought the gun home with him.

I thought this was a very interesting story.

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I am not sure, but mI don't think Commanding officers permissions were required. Nor was it necessary that you personally killed anyone. During WWII many soldiers scavenged guns from dead enemy soldiers or took them from prisoners and brought them home with them as souvenirs.

In those days there was no hysteria over gun ownership, and very few attemps to ban guns. New York City was one exception. It has had a general ban on personal gun ownership for as long as I can remember. However, someone with a demonstrated need, like a store owner, could obtain a permit even there. As we all know, that law is a joke because anyone can get a gun anytime they want with or without a permit. That is true every where.

Dec 9th 2012 new

(Quote) Paul-866591 said: I am not sure, but mI don't think Commanding officers permissions were required. Nor ...
(Quote) Paul-866591 said:

I am not sure, but mI don't think Commanding officers permissions were required. Nor was it necessary that you personally killed anyone. During WWII many soldiers scavenged guns from dead enemy soldiers or took them from prisoners and brought them home with them as souvenirs.

In those days there was no hysteria over gun ownership, and very few attemps to ban guns. New York City was one exception. It has had a general ban on personal gun ownership for as long as I can remember. However, someone with a demonstrated need, like a store owner, could obtain a permit even there. As we all know, that law is a joke because anyone can get a gun anytime they want with or without a permit. That is true every where.

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Based on what you are saying, then there are/were a lot of WW2 guns around, but that particular gun is rare?

The officer who was interviewed was quite young, and you know how history is revised. Maybe that is what he
was told.

Dec 9th 2012 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: Based on what you are saying, then there are/were a lot of WW2 guns around, but that p...
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:



Based on what you are saying, then there are/were a lot of WW2 guns around, but that particular gun is rare?

The officer who was interviewed was quite young, and you know how history is revised. Maybe that is what he
was told.

--hide--

I don't know that much about guns and did not watch the video so do notknow if the gun in question is or is not rare. I merely commented on the fact that no permission was required.

Dec 10th 2012 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: Based on what you are saying, then there are/were a lot of WW2 guns around, but that p...
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:



Based on what you are saying, then there are/were a lot of WW2 guns around, but that particular gun is rare?

The officer who was interviewed was quite young, and you know how history is revised. Maybe that is what he
was told.

--hide--


The weapon is the Sturmgewehr 44, or StG-44. It is the world's first assault rifle. The AK-47, made in the Soviet Union for the first time in 1947, bears a lot of resemblance to it. Even the caliber of the AK-47 is comparable to the StG-44 (7.62 vs. 7.92). I imagine what makes it rare is that production would have been limited, as the weapon came out in 1944 and the war in Europe was over by May of 1945.

The standard weapon for the German infantryman in the Second World War was the Mauser-98, which was a bolt-action rifle from the nineteenth century. (That would be 1898.) The StG-44 was designed for the closer-range battles (300 meters or less) that were taking place in Europe. The American soldiers were armed with the M-1 Garand, which was a semi-automatic weapon that gave the American infantryman an advantage over his German foe. (The Germans compensated for this by having more (and superior) machine guns in their infantry companies.) As the StG-44 could fire fully automatic, however, a German armed with it would have an advantage over his American enemy, particularly since most of the fire fights were occurring at 300 meters or less. However, I don't believe it was ever produced to the point where it could be issued as a standard service weapon. It's circulation was probably limited to the Schutzstaffel (SS) and elite units.


I hope this helps.

Dec 11th 2012 new

(Quote) William-607613 said: The weapon is the Sturmgewehr 44, or StG-44. It is the world's first assau...
(Quote) William-607613 said:



The weapon is the Sturmgewehr 44, or StG-44. It is the world's first assault rifle. The AK-47, made in the Soviet Union for the first time in 1947, bears a lot of resemblance to it. Even the caliber of the AK-47 is comparable to the StG-44 (7.62 vs. 7.92). I imagine what makes it rare is that production would have been limited, as the weapon came out in 1944 and the war in Europe was over by May of 1945.

The standard weapon for the German infantryman in the Second World War was the Mauser-98, which was a bolt-action rifle from the nineteenth century. (That would be 1898.) The StG-44 was designed for the closer-range battles (300 meters or less) that were taking place in Europe. The American soldiers were armed with the M-1 Garand, which was a semi-automatic weapon that gave the American infantryman an advantage over his German foe. (The Germans compensated for this by having more (and superior) machine guns in their infantry companies.) As the StG-44 could fire fully automatic, however, a German armed with it would have an advantage over his American enemy, particularly since most of the fire fights were occurring at 300 meters or less. However, I don't believe it was ever produced to the point where it could be issued as a standard service weapon. It's circulation was probably limited to the Schutzstaffel (SS) and elite units.


I hope this helps.

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Very interesting, William. I passed the information on to my brother and brother-in-law, who are WW2 buffs.

Dec 11th 2012 new

(Quote) William-607613 said: The weapon is the Sturmgewehr 44, or StG-44. It is the world's first assau...
(Quote) William-607613 said:



The weapon is the Sturmgewehr 44, or StG-44. It is the world's first assault rifle. The AK-47, made in the Soviet Union for the first time in 1947, bears a lot of resemblance to it. Even the caliber of the AK-47 is comparable to the StG-44 (7.62 vs. 7.92). I imagine what makes it rare is that production would have been limited, as the weapon came out in 1944 and the war in Europe was over by May of 1945.

The standard weapon for the German infantryman in the Second World War was the Mauser-98, which was a bolt-action rifle from the nineteenth century. (That would be 1898.) The StG-44 was designed for the closer-range battles (300 meters or less) that were taking place in Europe. The American soldiers were armed with the M-1 Garand, which was a semi-automatic weapon that gave the American infantryman an advantage over his German foe. (The Germans compensated for this by having more (and superior) machine guns in their infantry companies.) As the StG-44 could fire fully automatic, however, a German armed with it would have an advantage over his American enemy, particularly since most of the fire fights were occurring at 300 meters or less. However, I don't believe it was ever produced to the point where it could be issued as a standard service weapon. It's circulation was probably limited to the Schutzstaffel (SS) and elite units.


I hope this helps.

--hide--


Someone sent me this information after reading your post, William.

"Great info, there are pictures of German soldiers carrying the StG-44 during the battle of the bulge.... Couple of things to note, Hitler was unaware of the weapon, it was hidden from him, he felt the mauser-98 was all they needed. I think he found out about the StG-44 when visiting troops on the Russian Front and asked them what they needed, they replied more StG-44.....When he saw the rifle, and saw it perform, he named it the sturmgewehr (storm rifle---or something along those lines) Hitler was very impressed...."
Dec 11th 2012 new

(Quote) Marianne-100218 said: Someone sent me this information after reading your post, William. "Great ...
(Quote) Marianne-100218 said:



Someone sent me this information after reading your post, William.

"Great info, there are pictures of German soldiers carrying the StG-44 during the battle of the bulge.... Couple of things to note, Hitler was unaware of the weapon, it was hidden from him, he felt the mauser-98 was all they needed. I think he found out about the StG-44 when visiting troops on the Russian Front and asked them what they needed, they replied more StG-44.....When he saw the rifle, and saw it perform, he named it the sturmgewehr (storm rifle---or something along those lines) Hitler was very impressed...."

--hide--



That's interesting; I didn't know that Hitler was unaware of the weapon. As far as him saying that the Mauser 98 was all the troops needed, he might not have been far off the mark. In the 1980's the US military switched from the M16A1 (which offered an automatic rate of fire) to the M16A2 (which offers a 3-round burst in its place). The automatic rate of fire for the standard infantry weapon had been discontinued because it was found that people were using their ammunition too quickly and without taking the time to aim properly. This led to the infantrymen going through ammunition much faster than they should have, which then led to them having to carry much more ammunition, which added to weight they were already carrying and which also led to re-supply issues.

Dec 12th 2012 new

(Quote) William-607613 said: That's interesting; I didn't know that Hitler was unaware of the weapon. As...
(Quote) William-607613 said:




That's interesting; I didn't know that Hitler was unaware of the weapon. As far as him saying that the Mauser 98 was all the troops needed, he might not have been far off the mark. In the 1980's the US military switched from the M16A1 (which offered an automatic rate of fire) to the M16A2 (which offers a 3-round burst in its place). The automatic rate of fire for the standard infantry weapon had been discontinued because it was found that people were using their ammunition too quickly and without taking the time to aim properly. This led to the infantrymen going through ammunition much faster than they should have, which then led to them having to carry much more ammunition, which added to weight they were already carrying and which also led to re-supply issues.

--hide--


You really know about weapons, William! As I looked at your profile, I saw you in a military uniform. I guess that is
why. That makes so much sense if the soldiers shot indescriminately and used up too much ammunition, then they
would have to carry more, and it would be added weight, and it would be a supply problem also.

Based on your age in the picture, 24, you must have been in the first Gulf War. Is that correct?

Dec 12th 2012 new

(Quote) William-607613 said: That's interesting; I didn't know that Hitler was unaware of the weapon. As...
(Quote) William-607613 said:




That's interesting; I didn't know that Hitler was unaware of the weapon. As far as him saying that the Mauser 98 was all the troops needed, he might not have been far off the mark. In the 1980's the US military switched from the M16A1 (which offered an automatic rate of fire) to the M16A2 (which offers a 3-round burst in its place). The automatic rate of fire for the standard infantry weapon had been discontinued because it was found that people were using their ammunition too quickly and without taking the time to aim properly. This led to the infantrymen going through ammunition much faster than they should have, which then led to them having to carry much more ammunition, which added to weight they were already carrying and which also led to re-supply issues.

--hide--


don't forget to mention that the machine guns also got too hot when they fired too many rounds at a time. Examples include the German MG-42 in which they changed barrels whenever they loaded a new clip. This was a design that you could change the barrel in a matter of seconds.

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