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This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

Saint Peter's Square was created so that more people could be in the presence of the Pope and was named after Saint Peter, one of Jesus's apostles.
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Dec 19th 2012 new

(Quote) Clair-6292 said: Don't ruin my image. Too Many on CM would have their world fall apart if they knew how little...
(Quote) Clair-6292 said:

Don't ruin my image. Too Many on CM would have their world fall apart if they knew how little I know Are you still in hiding or what did I get wrong?
--hide--


...A good unit commander is always somewhat in hiding.... wink

Dec 19th 2012 new
(Quote) Rosanna-921185 said: ...A good unit commander is always somewhat in hiding....
(Quote) Rosanna-921185 said:




...A good unit commander is always somewhat in hiding....

--hide--


Did this answer your question?
Dec 19th 2012 new

(Quote) Clair-6292 said: Don't ruin my image. Too Many on CM would have their world fall apart if they knew how little...
(Quote) Clair-6292 said:

Don't ruin my image. Too Many on CM would have their world fall apart if they knew how little I know Are you still in hiding or what did I get wrong?
--hide--


wave hug

Dec 19th 2012 new
(Quote) Rosanna-921185 said:
(Quote) Rosanna-921185 said:




--hide--
Dec 19th 2012 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: (Quote) Lina-796057 said: Can't we be happy here AND be happy in Heaven?
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

Quote:
Lina-796057 said: Can't we be happy here AND be happy in Heaven?

Actually, no. The ultimate and true happiness will belong to those who earn their way into heaven. On earth, we're in an imperfect environment.

--hide--
This will sidetrack the thread a little.

I brought it up because Tim’s post stated an either/or situation regarding happiness, as though being happy here on earth was an impossibility. Of course, Ray, any earthly happiness is far inferior—like “seeing through a glass darkly”—to the supreme happiness experienced in Heaven. But to say we must be miserable here (especially in accepting God’s Will in our lives) is…an unfortunate statement to make. Perhaps Tim wrote incompletely and did not mean exactly what he wrote as it appeared. My question to him was sort of an elbow in his side, to see whether he’d write more of what he meant, if how it appeared to me was not exactly what he meant.

However, Ray, when you brought up “earning” Heaven, that agitated a different disagreement. We have Ephesians 2:8-9: “For it is by GRACE you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the GIFT of God—NOT BY WORKS, so that no one can boast.” In an effort to show where Catholics and Protestants agree, CatholicAnswers.com cites “the fact we are saved by grace and do not earn our place in heaven, that we must all repent of our sins and have a ‘personal relationship’ with Christ.” We should not be doing good works out of fear, so as to buy a ticket into Heaven. In that case, we are just a clanging bell or a noisy cymbal. We do good works through our love for God and His creatures, as the bounty of His love in us spills out to others. Here is another quote from Catholic Answers:

"Protestants are often confused about the role Catholics believe good works play in salvation, so you should clear this up for the Fundamentalist you know. You should explain to him that we do not perform good works in order to enter a state of justification. The Council of Trent stated that "nothing which precedes justification, whether faith or works, merits the grace of justification" (Decree on Justification 8).

In fact, it is impossible for an unjustified person to do supernaturally good works, since these are based on the virtue of charity (supernatural love), which an unjustified person does not have. Good works therefore flow from our reception of justification; they do not cause us to enter a state of justification. Good works increase the righteousness we are given at justification and please God, who promises to give us supernatural rewards on the last day, including the gift of eternal life (Rom 2:6-7, Gal 6:6-10)." www.catholic.com

Dec 19th 2012 new
The Serenity Prayer

God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.

Living one day at a time;
Enjoying one moment at a time;
Accepting hardships as the pathway to peace;
Taking, as He did, this sinful world
as it is, not as I would have it;
Trusting that He will make all things right
if I surrender to His Will;
That I may be reasonably happy in this life
and supremely happy with Him
Forever in the next.
Amen.

--Reinhold Niebuhr

In loving memory of
Fr Bertram Griffin -- 1932-2000
Requiescat in Pace

Trust in the LORD with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding;
in all your ways acknowledge him,
and he will direct your paths.

Proverbs 3, 5-6

Dec 19th 2012 new

We are only to be 'reasonably happy' in this world -- we are to yearn for the next. This world is just passing and we are not to cling too tightly or value it too much -- we Are Not to be truly happy here and now -- just reasonably: enough food, water, shelter, a good friend or two, work to do that somehow benefits mankind and gives us purpose, the basics -- after that, it all distracts us from our destination and purpose!

Dec 19th 2012 new

(Quote) Lina-796057 said: This will sidetrack the thread a little. I brought it up because Tim’s post stated an...
(Quote) Lina-796057 said:

This will sidetrack the thread a little.

I brought it up because Tim’s post stated an either/or situation regarding happiness, as though being happy here on earth was an impossibility. Of course, Ray, any earthly happiness is far inferior—like “seeing through a glass darkly”—to the supreme happiness experienced in Heaven. But to say we must be miserable here (especially in accepting God’s Will in our lives) is…an unfortunate statement to make. Perhaps Tim wrote incompletely and did not mean exactly what he wrote as it appeared. My question to him was sort of an elbow in his side, to see whether he’d write more of what he meant, if how it appeared to me was not exactly what he meant.

However, Ray, when you brought up “earning” Heaven, that agitated a different disagreement. We have Ephesians 2:8-9: “For it is by GRACE you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the GIFT of God—NOT BY WORKS, so that no one can boast.” In an effort to show where Catholics and Protestants agree, CatholicAnswers.com cites “the fact we are saved by grace and do not earn our place in heaven, that we must all repent of our sins and have a ‘personal relationship’ with Christ.” We should not be doing good works out of fear, so as to buy a ticket into Heaven. In that case, we are just a clanging bell or a noisy cymbal. We do good works through our love for God and His creatures, as the bounty of His love in us spills out to others. Here is another quote from Catholic Answers:

"Protestants are often confused about the role Catholics believe good works play in salvation, so you should clear this up for the Fundamentalist you know. You should explain to him that we do not perform good works in order to enter a state of justification. The Council of Trent stated that "nothing which precedes justification, whether faith or works, merits the grace of justification" (Decree on Justification 8).

In fact, it is impossible for an unjustified person to do supernaturally good works, since these are based on the virtue of charity (supernatural love), which an unjustified person does not have. Good works therefore flow from our reception of justification; they do not cause us to enter a state of justification. Good works increase the righteousness we are given at justification and please God, who promises to give us supernatural rewards on the last day, including the gift of eternal life (Rom 2:6-7, Gal 6:6-10)." www.catholic.com

--hide--
Darn it, Lina -- you nitpicker.... wink laughing

Ya got me, Lina. I misspoke. My focus was on the happiness theme. Add to that the fact the post was typed in the wee hours of the night and at least half of my brain was asleep (have fun with that one..... laughing )

Thanks for setting the record straight. hug

Dec 19th 2012 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: Darn it, Lina -- you nitpicker.... Ya got me, Lina. I misspoke. My focus was on the happines...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

Darn it, Lina -- you nitpicker....

Ya got me, Lina. I misspoke. My focus was on the happiness theme. Add to that the fact the post was typed in the wee hours of the night and at least half of my brain was asleep (have fun with that one..... )

Thanks for setting the record straight.

--hide--
hug

This is an area of stumbling for me, Ray, having been raised in a judgmental household where even my report card's A-minuses were not "good enough." Being told that God was like Jonathan Edwards' "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" vision, while learning different visions both at school and in my own readings. And having the light bulb slowly turn on around age 32 during Mass and hearing that we were adopted children of God. Adopted--consciously chosen by Him to be His!!

Someone once said that "happiness is an inside job." Meaning, it's up to us to choose to be happy. Our happiness does not have to be determined by outside circumstances. In a poem about two prisoners looking out their jail cell windows, "one saw mud, the other saw stars." I believe we CAN be happy here on earth, despite being divorced or widowed, despite having little money, despite physical mis-condition. We can be happy in "unhappy" situations. We don't have to LIKE the circumstances, but we can be happy people despite those miserable circumstances. Maybe this is one of the many paradoxes of our faith?

Dec 19th 2012 new

(Quote) Clair-6292 said: Women of CM, do you feel men, I know this is a generality, are living upto their call to protect you? Do y...
(Quote) Clair-6292 said: Women of CM, do you feel men, I know this is a generality, are living upto their call to protect you? Do you have good examples in your life? Do you feel the men on CM are living their role better than the public?
--hide--

Oh my goodness yes! Now, granted, I live in an extraordinary place with an extraordinary Catholic and family-centered community. A good example would be the way the men around here step up when my family needs "daddy" action. If there's a camping trip, set building for a play, sports activity, my girls will be invited to join. They even go so far as to include me in their Mothers Day celebrations. There's a group of men here who sometimes take the wives for a picnic in the Blue Ridge Mountains on Mothers Day, and they always invite me to join and be treated too.

These men not only protect us in the more familiar sense (coming to remove the snake from the basement, screening the boys that come sniffing around after my teens, etc.), but they also protect us from feeling the absence of fatherhood in our family as keenly as we would otherwise.

It's grand.



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