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This room is for the discussion of current events,cultural issues and politics especially in relation to Catholic values.

Saint Thomas More was martyred during the Protestant Reformation for standing firm in the Faith and not recognizing the King of England as the Supreme Head of the Church.
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Dec 23rd 2012 new

(Quote) Edward-4511 said: You're behind on your count of Trek movies, Victor. Number 12 in the series, "Star Trek Into Dar...
(Quote) Edward-4511 said: You're behind on your count of Trek movies, Victor. Number 12 in the series, "Star Trek Into Darkness", is coming out in May. www.startrekmovie.com
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Zoom, the last Star Trek movie I watched was the third one! rolling eyes


theheart

Dec 24th 2012 new

(Quote) Edward-4511 said: I should add, at one point "The Hobbit" was going to be only two movies, bu...
(Quote) Edward-4511 said:


I should add, at one point "The Hobbit" was going to be only two movies, but PJ & company decided they had enough material from the appendices to make three .... at least that's the official story.

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I read the Hobbit and LOTR ages ago. What are these appendices of which you speak?

Jan 3rd 2013 new

Okay, I saw the movie with my family over Christmas.

If they're going to bring in background material about the Necromancer and stuff like that, I can live with it.

I am NOT happy about the unnecessary changes to the plot.

And the fight in the Goblin town was just silly!

Jan 3rd 2013 new

I haven't seen it yet but I saw the Lords of the Rings three times and I understood the entire underlying message. I guess I will feel the same about 'The Hobbit' when I see it.

Jan 3rd 2013 new

I haven't seen it yet but I saw the Lords of the Rings three times and I understood the entire underlying message. I guess I will feel the same about 'The Hobbit' when I see it.

Jan 3rd 2013 new

Hi, Rosanna.

As I understand it: The book "The Hobbit" was written in the '30s and published in 1937. At that point, it was intended as a self-contained little children's story about some of the notable characters in Middle Earth, but at that point, Tolkein hadn't clarified the whole history and resolution of the Third Age. His publisher, Alen & Unin, asked for another story in the same setting, and got something very unlike what they were expecting.

(Imagine Johnny Gruelle, the author of 'Raggedy Ann', being asked for another children's story, and taking 15 years to write an epic trilogy with dozens of new characters, intended for adults. That's what Tolkein did.)

So, Tolkein wrote a lot of connective material, essays both published and unpublished, referencing Bilbo's adventure and setting it within the history of the Third Age. And any modern filmmaker has a choice: either present the Hobbit in its original, self-contained form ("Gandalf? Oh, he's just a bumbling, lovable old coot with minor magical powers. Nothing more.") or else present it as a chapter in the context of a larger saga. Jackson chose the second path.

Having said that: there was a *lot* of connective tissue we didn't need. Radagast? We could have done without Radagast.

--Chris

only a bit of a geek; when "Return of the King" came out, we made sure to get a group of nine people to walk to the theatre.

Jan 4th 2013 new

(Quote) Chris-930705 said: Hi, Rosanna. As I understand it: The book "The Hobbit" was written in t...
(Quote) Chris-930705 said:

Hi, Rosanna.

As I understand it: The book "The Hobbit" was written in the '30s and published in 1937. At that point, it was intended as a self-contained little children's story about some of the notable characters in Middle Earth, but at that point, Tolkein hadn't clarified the whole history and resolution of the Third Age. His publisher, Alen & Unin, asked for another story in the same setting, and got something very unlike what they were expecting.

(Imagine Johnny Gruelle, the author of 'Raggedy Ann', being asked for another children's story, and taking 15 years to write an epic trilogy with dozens of new characters, intended for adults. That's what Tolkein did.)

So, Tolkein wrote a lot of connective material, essays both published and unpublished, referencing Bilbo's adventure and setting it within the history of the Third Age. And any modern filmmaker has a choice: either present the Hobbit in its original, self-contained form ("Gandalf? Oh, he's just a bumbling, lovable old coot with minor magical powers. Nothing more.") or else present it as a chapter in the context of a larger saga. Jackson chose the second path.

Having said that: there was a *lot* of connective tissue we didn't need. Radagast? We could have done without Radagast.

--Chris

only a bit of a geek; when "Return of the King" came out, we made sure to get a group of nine people to walk to the theatre.

--hide--


Thanks Chris for the perspective I didn't have. I"m still not sure if it should be a 3-parter though. Not that I won't buy the DVDs when they come out though... wink

Jan 4th 2013 new

Chris explains it well, but I'm tired of hearing people say it is about the money. I mean, of course there's the financial aspect of it all, but the real reason it is three films is so the whole story can be told. He's doing it for the fans and for himself because Jackson is a huge Tolkien fan.

Actually, there is very little added in the Hobbit that Tolkien didn't write. Jackson said that this is really the only chance they have to show some things that otherwise will never be seen. In the Hobbit book, we see Gandalf go away on some errand, we don't know what. Something about a Necromancer. Jackson flushes it out. He changes very little.


This is a great article on the subject: www.huffingtonpost.com

Jan 4th 2013 new

Oh and a special quote about Radagast.


"Wondering why Radagast and his outrageous rabbit-sleigh needed to be in The Hobbit? Probably because Radagast was the only human being in all of Middle Earth sufficiently positioned (living, as he did, in the remote Greenwood Sauron sought to slink into unnoticed) to discover the Dark Lord of Mordor's return to Middle Earth. And Radagast's friendship with Gandalf the Grey made that crucial piece of intelligence available to the good guys decades earlier than might otherwise have been the case. "

Jan 4th 2013 new

Thanks for that Huff Post article, Jesse.

But I'm still not convinced about Radagast.

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