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Annulments?

Dec 31st 2012 new

Hi All! I have a question regarding annulments. And I mean no judgment whatsoever when I ask it...

Why are there so many? Alot of people on this site have them or are in the process of getting them. I thought annulments were only granted in rare circumstances.

I would appreciate the information. Happy New Year! Chelle flower

Dec 31st 2012 new

(Quote) Chelle-924354 said: Hi All! I have a question regarding annulments. And I mean no judgment whatsoever when I ask it...
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said:

Hi All! I have a question regarding annulments. And I mean no judgment whatsoever when I ask it...

Why are there so many? Alot of people on this site have them or are in the process of getting them. I thought annulments were only granted in rare circumstances.

I would appreciate the information. Happy New Year! Chelle

--hide--
well first off, Happy New year, But for me I was never married in the church. I was married by a justice of the peace. Yet I still needed to get a lack of form annulment. I guess because of the marriage license and having three kids . Here is my opinion on the rest if you don't mind me saying. I think the church married many who never should have been married in the first place,in last 30 or 40 years.

The church is trying to correct there mistakes in so many things and this is one of them. Now it is a bigger deal to get married today and they make sure they know and you know just what they are getting into. I remember so many people getting married, because the girl was pregnant, that never should have married. There are so many reason why but that is one of them. That's my two cents

Dec 31st 2012 new

That's because the grounds for an annulment today are barely more stringent than obtaining a civil divorce. The grounds for a marriage to be declared invalid - the true and only purpose for obtaining an annulment - were very stringent before Vatican II lowered the standards to the point where the great majority of petitions are granted. An annulment, by virtue, is only to consider the conditions and impediments as they existed on the day the marriage takes place, not the days following the marriage, which has become prevalent today.


The number of annulments in the US in 1968 totaled 338. In 1978 - 10 years later - more than 27,000 annulments were granted. In 1990, the number increased to nearly 63,000.


Pre-Vatican II the standards by which a marriage could be deemed invalid included:


- Forced marriage against the will of one or both parties


- Non-disclosure of homosexuality


- Non-disclosure of prior marriage in the Church


- The marriage was never consumated




Obviously, it isn't difficult to ascertain that these standards have not been upheld, particularly in this country. As an example, prior to Vatican II, instances of spousal infidelity and abuse weren't considered as valid grounds to deem a marriage as invalid because those conditions came to be after the marriage had taken place, not prior to. Prior to Vatican II the Church didn't even recognize or acknowledge marital rape. Much debate could be made as to whether the Church's positions regarded these instances were right or wrong, but that was the position of the Church in those days.


theheart

Jan 1st 2013 new

First, because so many marriages are entered into without proper discernment and fear of God. If we as a Church made people go through the analysis that is part of the annulment process as part of the Pre Cana process, and the Church really had to give its well discerned "permission" for you to marry in the Church, then there would be alot less annulments between Catholics who did marry in the Church, because they never would have married in the first place. I think the increase here is because the Church sees that it is partially her "fault" that these marriages took place in the first place; the Church fell short of her responsiblity to the faithful to be a better catechist to the engaged at the time. This is a post Vatican II situation.

The second reason is a pastoral one with two aspects: the first is so many have married outside the Church--so many wandered from the faith, thought it was "no big deal" to get married on a beach with a judge, etc. Now they want to "come home" to the Church but this marriage outside the Church stands in their way (emotionally, or actually). So it is a pastoral response to trying to bring those who have wandered back into the fold.

The second aspect is trying to keep people in the fold--they were married, divorced, still active in the parish, but now have found someone new, and unless they get the annulment, they will marry now outside the faith, because the relationship means more at that point than their Catholic faith. So in a pastoral effort to keep the faithful in the Church, the apply for and are usually granted the annulment.

There are just lots more people in all these groups these days than before, when no one even divorced.

That plus the American sense of "I deserve to be happy/it is my brithright to be happy/ I am owed/I deserve to get what I want" is behind the uptick, IMHO.

Note: nothing here is a commentary on any one person's marraige, divorce or annulment. I am simply addressing the increase in overall number of annulments granted by the Church, and in particularly, the American Church, in my opinion. It is a commentary more on the failings/motivations of the institutional Church, than of the faithful who seek them.

Jan 1st 2013 new
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said: Hi All! I have a question regarding annulments. And I mean no judgment whatsoever when I ask it...Wh...
(Quote) Chelle-924354 said:

Hi All! I have a question regarding annulments. And I mean no judgment whatsoever when I ask it...

Why are there so many? Alot of people on this site have them or are in the process of getting them. I thought annulments were only granted in rare circumstances.

I would appreciate the information. Happy New Year! Chelle

--hide--


Hi Chelle,

One of the issues that arose that was given a wider audience for annulments is the issue of mental capacity. I am sure that is not the proper term, but it conveys what I mean. The premise being that a persons mental state at the time of the wedding could be called into question. As advancements in psycotherapy, (psychology, psychiatry) in the 60's and 70' s begain to be realized, so were the many links between childhood traumas and the persons ability to make informed decisions with rational clarity. Hence, you cannot enter into a legal binding contract if you do not have the capacity to understand what marriage really means by Church definition. I had many of my friends say, well if this marriage doesn't work, i can always get a divorce. Kind of negates permanacy

This opened the door for more grounds to file. Contrary to popular belief, not everyone who files receives an annulment.
Jan 1st 2013 new

The real question we should be asking is not why so many annulments are now being granted, but why there is reason for so many annulments to be granted.


What I am curious is the statistics on the amount of annulments or even divorces for that matter when both spouses were faithful to Catholic teaching before and during the marriage. I bet it's near zero.

Jan 1st 2013 new

(Quote) Victor-544727 said: That's because the grounds for an annulment today are barely more stringent than obtaining a...
(Quote) Victor-544727 said:

That's because the grounds for an annulment today are barely more stringent than obtaining a civil divorce. The grounds for a marriage to be declared invalid - the true and only purpose for obtaining an annulment - were very stringent before Vatican II lowered the standards to the point where the great majority of petitions are granted. An annulment, by virtue, is only to consider the conditions and impediments as they existed on the day the marriage takes place, not the days following the marriage, which has become prevalent today.


The number of annulments in the US in 1968 totaled 338. In 1978 - 10 years later - more than 27,000 annulments were granted. In 1990, the number increased to nearly 63,000.


Pre-Vatican II the standards by which a marriage could be deemed invalid included:

- Forced marriage against the will of one or both parties

- Non-disclosure of homosexuality

- Non-disclosure of prior marriage in the Church

- The marriage was never consumated

Obviously, it isn't difficult to ascertain that these standards have not been upheld, particularly in this country. As an example, prior to Vatican II, instances of spousal infidelity and abuse weren't considered as valid grounds to deem a marriage as invalid because those conditions came to be after the marriage had taken place, not prior to. Prior to Vatican II the Church didn't even recognize or acknowledge marital rape. Much debate could be made as to whether the Church's positions regarded these instances were right or wrong, but that was the position of the Church in those days.

--hide--

Nor are they now.Marriage tribunals may consider such acts as evidence of a defect at the time of the marriage, but any tribunal that issues a decree of nullity based on those grounds alone is not acting in accord with canon law.

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