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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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Jan 1st 2013 new

I have dated a Protestant before, and of course there were a few problems. I would prefer to have a husband who is Catholic so we both can participate in our Church and grow in the faith together.

Jan 1st 2013 new

Yes, my thought is to find a devout Catholic man instead. biggrin Problem solved.

Jan 1st 2013 new
(Quote) Christine-894237 said: Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so? I have before, but ha...
(Quote) Christine-894237 said:

Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so?




I have before, but have generally not experienced much openness to the Catholic Church. I am attracted to men of deep faith and am still open to the possibility of dating a Protestant in the future... as long as he is willing to learn about my faith and seek truth with me! However, sometimes my interactions with Protestants leave me tired. I haven't encountered much willingness to dialogue rationally and it's challenging to be constantly on the defensive.




Thoughts?

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The greatest danger is when the Catholic party is poorly schooled in their faith because it creates the risk of the leaving the Church. It's happened twice in my family in the past two generations.

My Catholic grandfather dated my Protestant grandmother when he was in his 20s back in the 1940s and became a Protestant. The same thing with my Dad in the 1970s.

By the grace of God I found my way back to the Church. I think such relationships don't tend to work out where both parties are convicted in their faith.
Jan 1st 2013 new

I have dated more Protestants than I have Catholics. It does not have to be a problem unless you make it a problem. It all comes down to one thing and that is respect as you respect each others right to believe as they choose. I was married in the Catholic church with a mass and our sons were raised Catholic, but religion was never a problem. He even supported financially the Catholic church, but he never converted. We were together until we were parted by death. If I had waited for a Catholic man, I may never have married. I have no regrets.

Most recently I dated a retired Southern Baptist minister. One of his best friends is a Catholic priest. He never tried to convert me.

In an ideal world we would only date within our faith. I would love to date and fall in love with a Catholic man, but in all reality it may never happen. We have the choice to remain alone or open ourselves up to other possibilities.

Jan 1st 2013 new

(Quote) Christine-894237 said: Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so? I have before, ...
(Quote) Christine-894237 said:

Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so?


I have before, but have generally not experienced much openness to the Catholic Church. I am attracted to men of deep faith and am still open to the possibility of dating a Protestant in the future... as long as he is willing to learn about my faith and seek truth with me! However, sometimes my interactions with Protestants leave me tired. I haven't encountered much willingness to dialogue rationally and it's challenging to be constantly on the defensive.


Thoughts?

--hide--


My findings have been that if a person is a Protestant or any other religion is involved with their faith as we are as Catholic, it makes it a lot more difficult to have a match work with the two different faiths. They are faithful to their beliefs as we are faithful to ours.

On the other hand, if the person is Proestant or does not follow a formalized religion and is open to allowing the Catholic being who they are and is willing to participate at times than this is another story.

I was just saying this a.m. to my sister and my priest. My Father went to the Lord 30 years today. He was a man who always had his rosary in his pocket, first thing he put in the morning and last thing he took out at night. Went to mass every Sunday and received the sacraments regularly. His father on the other hand was Protestant and never went to church before marrying my grandmother. He met my grandmother who was a devote Catholic. Fell in love and married her. Never became a Catholic but brought up to 2 good catholic men (my father and his brother.) Much depends on the disposition of someone from the beginning. If one has to argue over religion from the beginning, I don't see it working but on the other han,d if both are open and come to an understanding and bringing the children, etc. up Catholic, then God work's straight with crooked lines.

Jan 1st 2013 new

(Quote) Andrea-368827 said: I think its fine. Maybe you would want to start with a friendship first ? Each person is ...
(Quote) Andrea-368827 said:

I think its fine. Maybe you would want to start with a friendship first ?

Each person is an individual and as Christians we should all pray for unity.

The obstacles that divide us are being worked on and some resolved. www.usccb.org

However, it does present many things to be worked through personally.

There are many different Protestant denominations and family backgrounds.

As a new Catholic - you may not want to be bombarded by misinformation from the Protestant. It can be tiresome and hurtful.

On the flip, you may both grow in your faith. I think it all depends on the people involved.

I haven't read from this site below before but I believe this is accurate to what I know.

I took the quote below from www.cfnews.org.

In his 1966 book Theological Highlights of Vatican II, Father Ratzinger, said that the Council document Lumen Gentium was purposely constructed along ecumenical lines to lay the foundation for Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism. Father Ratzinger says that according to Lumen Gentium:

“The Catholic Church has no right to absorb the other Churches... [A] basic unity — of Churches that remain Churches, yet become one Church — must replace the idea of conversion, even though conversion retains its meaningfulness for those in conscience motivated to seek it.”[10]

Father Ratzinger wrote this book during the Council. As a co-worker with Father Karl Rahner, he was heavily involved in drafting the documents. He is in a position to tell us what were the true intentions of the architects at Vatican II. And he declares that the true teaching of Vatican II, according to its authors, was that conversion is an option. The non-Catholic need not convert to the true Church for unity and for salvation. The principle of conversion of non-Catholics is replaced with the new principle of convergence with non-Catholics.

Everything since the Council follows this new model; the principle of conversion of non-Catholics is replaced by the new notion of convergence with non-Catholics.


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This is a beautiful quote, Andrea. I would want to clarify however (as you intimated in a later post), that when they refer to "other Churches" they are speaking specifically of Churches with apostolic roots. Protestant denominations are referred to in Vatican II as "ecclesial communities."

Jan 1st 2013 new

(Quote) Kristen-878108 said: This is a beautiful quote, Andrea. I would want to clarify however (as you intimated in...
(Quote) Kristen-878108 said:



This is a beautiful quote, Andrea. I would want to clarify however (as you intimated in a later post), that when they refer to "other Churches" they are speaking specifically of Churches with apostolic roots. Protestant denominations are referred to in Vatican II as "ecclesial communities."

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There is only one Christian faith with apostolic roots, the Catholic Church. There are no others, nor are there any others that were founded by Christ.


theheart

Jan 1st 2013 new

(Quote) Christine-894237 said: Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so? I have before, ...
(Quote) Christine-894237 said:

Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so?


I have before, but have generally not experienced much openness to the Catholic Church. I am attracted to men of deep faith and am still open to the possibility of dating a Protestant in the future... as long as he is willing to learn about my faith and seek truth with me! However, sometimes my interactions with Protestants leave me tired. I haven't encountered much willingness to dialogue rationally and it's challenging to be constantly on the defensive.


Thoughts?

--hide--


Christine, I think you know the answer to the question as well as anyone from what you describe above.

Previously I expressed that I think it is fine to date a Protestant and in fact, some even come to join the Catholic Church that way. And I pray for Christian unity.

Personally, for me, I would seek out someone that had as similar beliefs as I could find. I believe the Catholic Church is the church founded by Jesus and would seek a Catholic. What a person "does" follows from what they "believe". So not only would I prefer a Catholic, there would be beliefs I would like to be reasonably assured of, besides just accepting the Catholic Christian label. Like, respect for those with other beliefs would be one, divorce/remarriage not an option would be another.

Jan 1st 2013 new

Hi Christine,

Regarding dating somone from another denomination, I have been married twice and in both cases it was to a Lutheran woman. I now find myself single, again meaning I am twice divorced and annulled. Personally, I have vowed to only date within the faith from now on. I used to say that you could put me in a room with 50 women, 49 Catholic and one Lutheran and I would always fall for the Lutheran girl!

More seriously, I have come to think that Catholic women tend to take "...till death do us part..." more seriously than did the Lutheran women I have been wed to. You see, in my case, it was my wife who initiated the divorce both times. In both cases I was willing to stay unhappily married and they were not.

So depending on what you are looking for in the relationship and before it gets really serious, you guys need to have a conversation about it. As an aside, my dad converted to Catholicism during WWII, while dating my mother, and didn't tell her he had converted until after she agreed that she really loved him and would marry him even if he remained Protestant! When she said she would, he told her he had been taking instruction and was converting! Their marriage lasted 63 years; until death did them part...

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Christine-894237 said: Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so? I have before, ...
(Quote) Christine-894237 said:

Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so?


I have before, but have generally not experienced much openness to the Catholic Church. I am attracted to men of deep faith and am still open to the possibility of dating a Protestant in the future... as long as he is willing to learn about my faith and seek truth with me! However, sometimes my interactions with Protestants leave me tired. I haven't encountered much willingness to dialogue rationally and it's challenging to be constantly on the defensive.


Thoughts?

--hide--


It can be lovely - until you're married and the first baby arrives. Then the fireworks start.

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