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Discussion related to living as a Catholic in the single state of life. As long as a topic is being discussed from the perspective of a single Catholic then it will be on-topic.

Tobias and Sarah's story is from the Book of Tobit, and his journey is guided by Saint Raphael.
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Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Meagan-930279 said: I would not date a protestant. There are several reasons. I do believe that the man is ca...
(Quote) Meagan-930279 said:

I would not date a protestant. There are several reasons.

I do believe that the man is called to be the spiritual head of the household. This doesn't mean I have to believe everything he says, but that I am called to follow his lead and to trust him with the spiritual welfare of myself and the children. To turn around and say that I disagree with him on the fundamentals of faith, which should be the basis of the marriage, and I will raise the kids my own way, is to undermine him. To me, this weakens the marriage bond at a basic level. The only way to have a marriage based on faith where I may be faithful to my husband and the Church is to only date and marry in the Catholic Church.

I was married once to someone of a different reliegion. I am not talking about I was Catholic and he was some protestant denomination. He was an ecclectic druidic neopagan (along the lines of wicca if you are familiar with that). When we married neither one of us were really practicing anything. I had fallen rather far away from the church and he didn't practice. A year later and my daughter was born. I desired to return to the Church and raise her in the Faith and he still had strong anti-Christian leanings. I could be faithful to both. I know what is is to be unequally yojed and to live in a house divided. I know my example was an extreme, but why even subject myself to the same issues?

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If a man is a devout Christian, but is not Catholic, I don't necessarily agree with the argument on spiritual head. . . I could have been spiritual head as a Protestant married to a Catholic and allowed my children to be raised Catholic. . . I would consider a union with another Christian, but never outside the Christian faith. . . and by Christian, I mean active and practicing, not just a denominational reference to a Christ-based religion. . .

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Meg-920823 said: My Mother is a convert and later, her mother converted, all because of mother dating my father. Mot...
(Quote) Meg-920823 said:

My Mother is a convert and later, her mother converted, all because of mother dating my father. Mother joined before they were married and, to this day is very devout. That being said, there are several things I would consider:

What if the non-Catholic man I date decides to join the Church but it is for the wrong reasons? For instance, he could join because he wants the 'unity' in our new family or because he wants to please me and be what he thinks I want. I am sceptical of big changes I see in guys when they begin to date a woman or vice versa. On a conscious level, they may not realize there is a lack of authenticity. We can all tend to do that. The rose colored glasses are easy to wear especially among optimistic, lonely and 'in love' couples. There are also outgoing, friendly personalities who tend to 'mirror and match' in order to connect with others. Sales people are taught this skill.

I stated this in another post but, again, I love so many things in life and I have come to realize that what I love has much to do with my Catholic Faith. Dancing, working out, reading, friends, nature...it all is viewed through Catholic lenses. Therefore I want to share that core part of me that so impacts my passions and day to day decisions. My spouse should be the closest person in the world to me. I would forfeit joy without that total union; I could have had so much more in a marriage.


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my ex and i were married 20 years. she was not baptised when we married. 7 years into the marriage she converted because she wanted to. by then we had 1 child (4 more followed). there was never any argument that the kids would be raised catholic. her parents were not happy about the conversion, but didn't put up any opposition. it simply dismayed them.

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Lynn-189934 said: If a man is a devout Christian, but is not Catholic, I don't necessarily agree with th...
(Quote) Lynn-189934 said:



If a man is a devout Christian, but is not Catholic, I don't necessarily agree with the argument on spiritual head. . . I could have been spiritual head as a Protestant married to a Catholic and allowed my children to be raised Catholic. . . I would consider a union with another Christian, but never outside the Christian faith. . . and by Christian, I mean active and practicing, not just a denominational reference to a Christ-based religion. . .

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What's the difference between an "active and practicing Christian" and a "denominational reference to a Christ-based religion"? None. The only "Christ-based" religion is the only religion founded by Christ, His Holy Catholic Church. Not one other faith is based in Christ's teachings, they're just "denominational references" proclaiming Christianity all the while actively practicing in protestation of the Christ's teachings.


A devout Christian who is a non-Catholic is a just a Protestant whose soul is no more in a state of grace than a non-practicing Catholic, as both exist devoid of sacramental grace.


theheart

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Victor-544727 said: What's the difference between an "active and practicing Christian" and a "denominational refere...
(Quote) Victor-544727 said:

What's the difference between an "active and practicing Christian" and a "denominational reference to a Christ-based religion"? None. The only "Christ-based" religion is the only religion founded by Christ, His Holy Catholic Church. Not one other faith is based in Christ's teachings, they're just "denominational references" proclaiming Christianity all the while actively practicing in protestation of the Christ's teachings.


A devout Christian who is a non-Catholic is a just a Protestant whose soul is no more in a state of grace than a non-practicing Catholic, as both exist devoid of sacramental grace.

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Statements like this tend to divide, rather than draw people into communion with the Catholic Church. Ever think that's why Protestants get just as bad a feel for us?

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Lynn-189934 said: Statements like this tend to divide, rather than draw people into communion with the Catholic Chu...
(Quote) Lynn-189934 said:

Statements like this tend to divide, rather than draw people into communion with the Catholic Church. Ever think that's why Protestants get just as bad a feel for us?

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That would be completely incorrect. The divide already exists. If there was no existing divide there would be no Protestants. Placating to that which is known to be wrong only expands the divide, but truth bridges that divide as it provides the pathway for those who have wandered to return.


theheart

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Christine-894237 said: Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so? I have before, ...
(Quote) Christine-894237 said:

Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so?


I have before, but have generally not experienced much openness to the Catholic Church. I am attracted to men of deep faith and am still open to the possibility of dating a Protestant in the future... as long as he is willing to learn about my faith and seek truth with me! However, sometimes my interactions with Protestants leave me tired. I haven't encountered much willingness to dialogue rationally and it's challenging to be constantly on the defensive.


Thoughts?

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My mother grew up in the United church but converted to the Catholic Faith before she married dad. Mom was a good Catholic. I still remember her telling me that Mary is also my mother when I was young. Christine I was going to suggest that you should ask the guy if he is willing to convert early in the relationship, if he is not willing then move on. But after reading Meagan's post on the previous page I am having second thoughts. She makes a good point when she says "the man is called to be the spiritual head of the household". That makes it difficult for a Catholic lady if he is not Catholic. I'd suggest that you stick to dating only a Catholic man. That is why you joined this Catholic dating site, isn't it?

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Andrea-368827 said: I think its fine. Maybe you would want to start with a friendship first ? Each person is ...
(Quote) Andrea-368827 said:

I think its fine. Maybe you would want to start with a friendship first ?

Each person is an individual and as Christians we should all pray for unity.

The obstacles that divide us are being worked on and some resolved. www.usccb.org

However, it does present many things to be worked through personally.

There are many different Protestant denominations and family backgrounds.

As a new Catholic - you may not want to be bombarded by misinformation from the Protestant. It can be tiresome and hurtful.

On the flip, you may both grow in your faith. I think it all depends on the people involved.

I haven't read from this site below before but I believe this is accurate to what I know.

I took the quote below from www.cfnews.org.

In his 1966 book Theological Highlights of Vatican II, Father Ratzinger, said that the Council document Lumen Gentium was purposely constructed along ecumenical lines to lay the foundation for Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism. Father Ratzinger says that according to Lumen Gentium:

“The Catholic Church has no right to absorb the other Churches... [A] basic unity — of Churches that remain Churches, yet become one Church — must replace the idea of conversion, even though conversion retains its meaningfulness for those in conscience motivated to seek it.”[10]

Father Ratzinger wrote this book during the Council. As a co-worker with Father Karl Rahner, he was heavily involved in drafting the documents. He is in a position to tell us what were the true intentions of the architects at Vatican II. And he declares that the true teaching of Vatican II, according to its authors, was that conversion is an option. The non-Catholic need not convert to the true Church for unity and for salvation. The principle of conversion of non-Catholics is replaced with the new principle of convergence with non-Catholics.

Everything since the Council follows this new model; the principle of conversion of non-Catholics is replaced by the new notion of convergence with non-Catholics.


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Andrea you said "I took the quote below from www.cfnews.org ".

But did you read that entire page yourself? You should. In fact we all should.

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Andrea-368827 said: I think its fine. Maybe you would want to start with a friendship first ? Each person is ...
(Quote) Andrea-368827 said:

I think its fine. Maybe you would want to start with a friendship first ?

Each person is an individual and as Christians we should all pray for unity.

The obstacles that divide us are being worked on and some resolved. www.usccb.org

However, it does present many things to be worked through personally.

There are many different Protestant denominations and family backgrounds.

As a new Catholic - you may not want to be bombarded by misinformation from the Protestant. It can be tiresome and hurtful.

On the flip, you may both grow in your faith. I think it all depends on the people involved.

I haven't read from this site below before but I believe this is accurate to what I know.

I took the quote below from www.cfnews.org.

In his 1966 book Theological Highlights of Vatican II, Father Ratzinger, said that the Council document Lumen Gentium was purposely constructed along ecumenical lines to lay the foundation for Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism. Father Ratzinger says that according to Lumen Gentium:

“The Catholic Church has no right to absorb the other Churches... [A] basic unity — of Churches that remain Churches, yet become one Church — must replace the idea of conversion, even though conversion retains its meaningfulness for those in conscience motivated to seek it.”[10]

Father Ratzinger wrote this book during the Council. As a co-worker with Father Karl Rahner, he was heavily involved in drafting the documents. He is in a position to tell us what were the true intentions of the architects at Vatican II. And he declares that the true teaching of Vatican II, according to its authors, was that conversion is an option. The non-Catholic need not convert to the true Church for unity and for salvation. The principle of conversion of non-Catholics is replaced with the new principle of convergence with non-Catholics.

Everything since the Council follows this new model; the principle of conversion of non-Catholics is replaced by the new notion of convergence with non-Catholics.



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Though in a sense this is true, like the evangelicals who have come into agreement with the Church. They have to recognize the Pope as the head and agree to all the teachings and the sacraments of the Church. Also when they come into communion with the Church they can not ordain any married priest anymore or have any Priest but men. The church will give them there own right as there are many in the church already, but there is so much they will have to change to be in communion with the Church. The Catholic Church will not change any of it's teachings to satisfy another faith especially the sacrifice in the mass and belief that it is indeed Jesus Christ present in the Eucharist. There is so much more involved and this little tidbit doesn't completely show what is needed to come into communion with the Catholic Church.

Jan 2nd 2013 new

If you have a heart big enough to accept the difference in some basic Faith i.e. Eucharist, Confession, Rosary ... etc., in this case, I don't see dating a protestant will be a big issue or problem.

But the problem will surface, once you are committed to this relationship.

Ask yourself these questions first:

Am I willing to sacrifice everything including my Faith for this man or this woman? Am I willing to be "OPEN MINDED" to the point that I will accept the teaching that is contradict to the FAITH?

The reason I say this is because, one of my student, just went through this problem and He ended up decide to go along with the Lady of His love. She is a J.W. For some of us who know about J.W. their teaching has already been labeled as heresy be the first council of Nicaea . T

he following was my advise to my student. Physical attraction is momentary. If the relationship is not based on something more deeper than the initial attraction. All I can say is "Good Luck" and "suck it up" You make the choice and take the responsibility for the choice you make. Just make sure the person you love has the same degree of "OPEN MIND" to accept the difference.

Jan 2nd 2013 new
(Quote) Christine-894237 said: Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so? I have before, but ha...
(Quote) Christine-894237 said:

Have you ever dated a Protestant or would you be willing to do so?




I have before, but have generally not experienced much openness to the Catholic Church. I am attracted to men of deep faith and am still open to the possibility of dating a Protestant in the future... as long as he is willing to learn about my faith and seek truth with me! However, sometimes my interactions with Protestants leave me tired. I haven't encountered much willingness to dialogue rationally and it's challenging to be constantly on the defensive.




Thoughts?

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I dated one when I was in college, but I wasn't quite at the same place spiritually then as I am now. I wouldn't date a Protestant now. The only exception would be if they were on the path to converting to Catholicism.
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