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So I brought the truck in for its latest round of unforeseen repairs. What I thought was a leaking heater core turned out to be a damaged water pump, which I had previously replaced. Turns out that one of the bolts apparently broke from the shoddy job Goodyear did back in Marietta, GA, requiring the mechanics to now drill out and retap the hole. Along with that is a leaky gasket around the transmission. Total repair estimate is $2100 or so. Last time I was at the dealership, they told me that if I would purchase a new vehicle, they would take the truck as is (before this latest tragedy), and count the trade-in value against the cost of the new vehicle. I only wish I had.

And the vehicle I had looked at during the last visit is no longer available, and the number of 2012 Colorados remaining in the inventory don't fit my desired criteria. I did find a GMC Canyon (equivalent to the Colorado) that comes close.

So now I have to spend $2100 on the repairs, then another $27G or so for a new truck. I can afford it, but I wish I'd taken the opportunity during the last debacle.


Lesson learned for me and everyone else. Anyone have any sage advice to offer?

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Carl-98335 said: So I brought the truck in for its latest round of unforeseen repairs. What I thought was a leaking ...
(Quote) Carl-98335 said:

So I brought the truck in for its latest round of unforeseen repairs. What I thought was a leaking heater core turned out to be a damaged water pump, which I had previously replaced. Turns out that one of the bolts apparently broke from the shoddy job Goodyear did back in Marietta, GA, requiring the mechanics to now drill out and retap the hole. Along with that is a leaky gasket around the transmission. Total repair estimate is $2100 or so. Last time I was at the dealership, they told me that if I would purchase a new vehicle, they would take the truck as is (before this latest tragedy), and count the trade-in value against the cost of the new vehicle. I only wish I had.

And the vehicle I had looked at during the last visit is no longer available, and the number of 2012 Colorados remaining in the inventory don't fit my desired criteria. I did find a GMC Canyon (equivalent to the Colorado) that comes close.

So now I have to spend $2100 on the repairs, then another $27G or so for a new truck. I can afford it, but I wish I'd taken the opportunity during the last debacle.


Lesson learned for me and everyone else. Anyone have any sage advice to offer?

--hide--


Hey Carl, I was in a similiar situation this past year... My truck has some age on it, but its paid for too... I guess the truck being paid for was the deciding factor for me to just keep fixing the thing... For me, it was the right way to go... I have a dealer make all my repairs too, because I have had a similiar experience with a Goodyear Dealer... Take care now...


Jan 2nd 2013 new

What is the make and model yr of your current truck? I take it the water pump is not broken, just leaking badly. If this is correct just take gasket sealer and thread the bolt back into position, wait a few hours, and drive the truck to dealership. They are probably only going to give you a couple grand for the vehicle anyhow. Both of those problems will be fixed by dealership in about 1 hour after being recognized.


Remember to negotiate a price for your new vehicle first. Then talk trade in value, not the other way around. Do not repair the vehicle, you are throwing money away. Good luck.

Jan 2nd 2013 new

Too late. I already authorized the repair. The dealers are the ones who identified the water pump leak. Because of the need to drill out and retap the hole, they told me it wouldn't be done until the end of the day tomorrow. They also said they would provide documentation in case I want to make a case against the Goodyear shop. Not sure if that will be of any use.

Jan 2nd 2013 new

(Quote) Carl-98335 said: So I brought the truck in for its latest round of unforeseen repairs. What I thought was a leaking ...
(Quote) Carl-98335 said:

So I brought the truck in for its latest round of unforeseen repairs. What I thought was a leaking heater core turned out to be a damaged water pump, which I had previously replaced. Turns out that one of the bolts apparently broke from the shoddy job Goodyear did back in Marietta, GA, requiring the mechanics to now drill out and retap the hole. Along with that is a leaky gasket around the transmission. Total repair estimate is $2100 or so. Last time I was at the dealership, they told me that if I would purchase a new vehicle, they would take the truck as is (before this latest tragedy), and count the trade-in value against the cost of the new vehicle. I only wish I had.

And the vehicle I had looked at during the last visit is no longer available, and the number of 2012 Colorados remaining in the inventory don't fit my desired criteria. I did find a GMC Canyon (equivalent to the Colorado) that comes close.

So now I have to spend $2100 on the repairs, then another $27G or so for a new truck. I can afford it, but I wish I'd taken the opportunity during the last debacle.


Lesson learned for me and everyone else. Anyone have any sage advice to offer?

--hide--



Carl,

Although I bought my car used (I'm the second owner), I make it a point to take my car to the local Ford dealer for all of my work except for an occasional oil change. I've been told that I end up paying more, but keep in mind that a dealer not only has an interest in maintaining your vehicle, he also has an interest in selling you the next one. If you have a bad experience with GMC or anyone else, the dealer faces the fact that you might walk away from the vehicle make. A dealership has to fix your car, and they have to keep you coming back. (If Goodyear does a bad job on the other hand, then you might not come back for another repair or you might not come back for their tires.)

I haven't read your previous thread on the topic in its entirety so I don't know the story behind your intent to purchase a new vehicle, but you might not be as bad off as you think. When the show "Car Talk" was on NPR, I distinctly remember hearing one of the hosts inform a caller that if you have a vehicle that you like and you can keep, then it would be worth it for you to pay up to $2,000.00 a year in repairs (not maintenance) to keep your vehicle and not buy a new one. $2,100.00 is close enough to this guideline. (I imagine one would reach a point in time where the vehicle reached an age that there was a risk of something unforeseen breaking down either in the dead of night or in the middle of nowhere, in which case it would not make sense to put any amount of money into an old car, no matter how little.)

Jan 2nd 2013 new

This is more like $3-4000 per year, so it's definitely time. It has almost 250,000 miles on it, too.

Jan 7th 2013 new

Bought the 2012 Colorado crew cab plus an extended warranty for 5 years/100K. Took photos of the damage to the water pump and engine block. Now what would be my best move? Approach the folks who did the repair and request a refund?

Jan 8th 2013 new

Water pump is on the front of the engine. The heater core is on the firewall. They are 3 feet apart, at least. Not sure how one can confuse the two, especially when it comes to a leak... Unless you only noticed water on the ground, and didn't actually get under the truck to see where the leak was coming from.

A water pump can't be much more than $200.00 . Labor to replace it should not be more than about $300.00, and that is being beyond generous. Drilling and tapping out a stripped or broken bolt should not be more than $100.00. Add in another 100 if they had to pull the radiator so they could get a drill lined up to drill /easy-out/tap the hole. And if it was stripped off / broken from before, how did it suddenly just start to leak? Transmission pan gasket should run no more than $100.00, and maybe $100.00 for labor. If the transmission gasket is the one behind the torque convertor, then the transmission has to be pulled. Even that should not be more than $500.00, since it can be pulled without removing the engine. A small block Chevy has 6 bolts that mate the engine/transmission, and two bolts on the transmission crossmember. Then the linkage to shifter, and then pull the driveline/yoke. That's it. Oh, and 3 bolts that mate the torque converter to the flex plate. 9/16 inch wrench if I remember correctly.... Can't use a socket there, because there is not much room between the flex plate and converter.


If you can afford it, and don't like to work on your own vehicles then you probably should trade it in. Repairs from a dealership for high mileage vehicles can really add up. If you can do the work yourself, then it is actually very cost effective to hang on to them...




(Quote) Carl-98335 said: So I brought the truck in for its latest round of unforeseen repairs. What I thought was a leaking ...
(Quote) Carl-98335 said:

So I brought the truck in for its latest round of unforeseen repairs. What I thought was a leaking heater core turned out to be a damaged water pump, which I had previously replaced. Turns out that one of the bolts apparently broke from the shoddy job Goodyear did back in Marietta, GA, requiring the mechanics to now drill out and retap the hole. Along with that is a leaky gasket around the transmission. Total repair estimate is $2100 or so. Last time I was at the dealership, they told me that if I would purchase a new vehicle, they would take the truck as is (before this latest tragedy), and count the trade-in value against the cost of the new vehicle. I only wish I had.

And the vehicle I had looked at during the last visit is no longer available, and the number of 2012 Colorados remaining in the inventory don't fit my desired criteria. I did find a GMC Canyon (equivalent to the Colorado) that comes close.

So now I have to spend $2100 on the repairs, then another $27G or so for a new truck. I can afford it, but I wish I'd taken the opportunity during the last debacle.


Lesson learned for me and everyone else. Anyone have any sage advice to offer?

--hide--

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