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This room is for discussion related to learning about the faith (Catechetics), defense of the Faith (Apologetics), the Liturgy and canon law, motivated by a desire to grow closer to Christ or to bring someone else closer.

Saint Augustine of Hippo is considered on of the greatest Christian thinkers of all time and the Doctor of the Church.
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Jan 11th 2013 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: Is turning one's back on those who have turned their backs on the Church a solution? Or does it...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

Is turning one's back on those who have turned their backs on the Church a solution? Or does it contribute to perpetuating the hostility? Such a situation might be a time to help the other person. Dig far enough and you will often find a lot of misunderstanding, or even deep hurts that were inflicted by people in the Church who should have been helping, not hindering. Perhaps you can be of great help to that person in guiding him back to the Faith.

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Ray Are you insinuating I would turn my back on a fellow Catholic? The question was "What is the best thing to do when you encounter a hostile fallen away Catholic who shows that he or she doesn't have a basic understanding of the Catholic faith and is unwilling to listen? Im not going to take ownership for someone who chooses to turn there back on their faith. If someone is being hostile, then they are the one perpetuating the negativity. I know you dont think it would be a good idea for me to stand there and reason with that person. I'm all about helping people, believe me. The scenerio discribed, however warrent the direct communication approach. I hope you dont think me mean.

Jan 11th 2013 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: What is the best thing to do when you encounter a hostile fallen away Catholic who shows that he or she d...
(Quote) John-220051 said: What is the best thing to do when you encounter a hostile fallen away Catholic who shows that he or she doesn't have a basic understanding of the Catholic faith and is unwilling to listen?
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I don't think it is uncommon for people to turn their back on their faith. Many people did that during the sex scandal in the church era right? We are human. That's doesn't mean they won't learn and grow and change their mind again. If their post were just part of a stream of posting it is one thing...if they were posting specifically on your profile, it is different. I don't know much about FB mind you! You don't deserve to be attacked, on the other had unfriending someone doesn't come across as Christian. I would reach out by message or e-mail and let that person know why you unfriended them and that their posting made you uncomfortable. If there is still something to gain, learn, grow, exchange by the friendship don't give up on that. That person will remember you stuck with them. We all go through ups and downs and changes in life. Nobody is perfect.

Jan 12th 2013 new

(Quote) Theresa-911246 said: Ray Are you insinuating I would turn my back on a fellow Catholic? The question was "What ...
(Quote) Theresa-911246 said:

Ray Are you insinuating I would turn my back on a fellow Catholic? The question was "What is the best thing to do when you encounter a hostile fallen away Catholic who shows that he or she doesn't have a basic understanding of the Catholic faith and is unwilling to listen? Im not going to take ownership for someone who chooses to turn there back on their faith. If someone is being hostile, then they are the one perpetuating the negativity. I know you dont think it would be a good idea for me to stand there and reason with that person. I'm all about helping people, believe me. The scenerio discribed, however warrent the direct communication approach. I hope you dont think me mean.

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No, Theresa. If you read my other posts you might understand what I was getting at. A knee-jerk reaction to someone's hostility about the Church is to ignore it, or walk away, and being sure they are unwilling to listen. This may be true -- they are not in the mood to listen. However, the other approach is frequently workable. Oftentimes the best preaching we can do is to listen -- perhaps say nothing or very little at the time. The goal is to find out exactly what is bothering them about the Church. Why have they left? Instead of trying to verbally show people where and how they are wrong, it makes sense to listen to them -- let them be open about their doubts, feelings and concerns. The role of listener can be very effective, and "say" more than we could ever tell a person.

We're all called to be evangelists so we look for effective ways to understand other people's concerns. The approach (listening to others) is helpful, workable and effective.

Jan 12th 2013 new

As my wise father always told me say a prayer for them

Jan 12th 2013 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: No, Theresa. If you read my other posts you might understand what I was getting at. A knee-jerk rea...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

No, Theresa. If you read my other posts you might understand what I was getting at. A knee-jerk reaction to someone's hostility about the Church is to ignore it, or walk away, and being sure they are unwilling to listen. This may be true -- they are not in the mood to listen. However, the other approach is frequently workable. Oftentimes the best preaching we can do is to listen -- perhaps say nothing or very little at the time. The goal is to find out exactly what is bothering them about the Church. Why have they left? Instead of trying to verbally show people where and how they are wrong, it makes sense to listen to them -- let them be open about their doubts, feelings and concerns. The role of listener can be very effective, and "say" more than we could ever tell a person.

We're all called to be evangelists so we look for effective ways to understand other people's concerns. The approach (listening to others) is helpful, workable and effective.

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Ray, I understand you well enough. theheart

Jan 12th 2013 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: No, Theresa. If you read my other posts you might understand what I was getting at. A knee-jerk rea...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

No, Theresa. If you read my other posts you might understand what I was getting at. A knee-jerk reaction to someone's hostility about the Church is to ignore it, or walk away, and being sure they are unwilling to listen. This may be true -- they are not in the mood to listen. However, the other approach is frequently workable. Oftentimes the best preaching we can do is to listen -- perhaps say nothing or very little at the time. The goal is to find out exactly what is bothering them about the Church. Why have they left? Instead of trying to verbally show people where and how they are wrong, it makes sense to listen to them -- let them be open about their doubts, feelings and concerns. The role of listener can be very effective, and "say" more than we could ever tell a person.

We're all called to be evangelists so we look for effective ways to understand other people's concerns. The approach (listening to others) is helpful, workable and effective.

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Good point, and I think it rounds back to the question; Am I my brother's keeper? Cain's rhetorical interrogative, which has to be one of the most quoted lines from the Old Testament both religiously and secular, stays with us for a reason. God calls us all to be stewards for each other, whether through instruction of faith, or by listening and reasoning, or reminding our brothers and sisters of the temptation of sin and its consequences. The more you grow in Faith, the more God expects from you. As your understanding of Faith increases, so does the level of trust between you and God. It's like how a parent trusts an older child to care for his or her younger siblings as that child matures, or to understand the concepts of right from wrong and similalry pass that knowledge along to the younger siblings.

You don't have to engage in active debate with someone to plant a seed of inquiry in their mind. A simple phrase or a simple answer presented without challenge or contention has often yielded the best results for me. Forceful presentation or argument rarely changes anyone's opinion or stance, and I have found that it often polarizes someone into their original argument even in the face of irrefutable evidence to the contrary. If there is one thing most people dislike more than being wrong, it's being proven wrong and having to concede as such. For me it's a better alternative is to state my position, plant that seed, and let my debater discover the truth on their own.

Jan 12th 2013 new

(Quote) John-220051 said: What is the best thing to do when you encounter a hostile fallen away Catholic who shows that he or she d...
(Quote) John-220051 said: What is the best thing to do when you encounter a hostile fallen away Catholic who shows that he or she doesn't have a basic understanding of the Catholic faith and is unwilling to listen?
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So John, you've met my siblings? laughing

Jan 18th 2013 new

(Quote) John-146319 said: The best thing varies from person to person. When someone challenges me to defend the Catholic ten...
(Quote) John-146319 said:

The best thing varies from person to person. When someone challenges me to defend the Catholic tenets, liturgy, history, or actions, I reply that it's not necessary for me to defend an institution that was chartered by Christ and has flourished for nearly 2000 years before I was born to defend it, and will continue to flourish without my defense long after I'm gone. But I'm always willing to discuss and explain the Faith to the best of my own (limited) knowledge of Apologetics. When I don't have an immediate answer to a specific question (and that's more often than not) I offer to research it and provide them with a timely answer. If it's a friend or family member I remind them if they like and respect who I am and how I carry myself, they can credit the Catholic Church for being my foundation.

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John, I'm proud to be able to call you brother in faith. smile

Jan 20th 2013 new

(Quote) Peter-933860 said: John, I'm proud to be able to call you brother in faith.
(Quote) Peter-933860 said:

John, I'm proud to be able to call you brother in faith.

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Thank you, Peter. The respect is mutual

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