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Devoted to discussion pertaining to those issues which are specifically relevant to people under 45. Topics must have a specific perspective of people in this age group for it to be on topic.

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Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) Andrea-883787 said: Jeanette- I'm trying to remember and I don't know if I read anything out of the usual: B...
(Quote) Andrea-883787 said:

Jeanette- I'm trying to remember and I don't know if I read anything out of the usual: Betsy-Tacy, Little House on the Prairie, Anne of Green Gables, Nancy Drew, Chronicles of Narnia... I liked to stick to series or authors because then I knew there would be another one coming soon after :) I enjoyed the Golden Goblet and Mara Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and At the Back of the North Wind and The Princess and the Goblins by George MacDonald.All the Bethlehem books that Ignatius Press sells are really good. Hope it helps!

God Bless



P.S. Thank you for asking! I like remembering things I haven't read in a while

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Homeschoolers seem to be the only ones who regularly read: L.M. Montgomery, Stratemeyer Syndicate books (Tom Swift, Tom Swift, Jr., The Hardy Boys, The Dana Girls, Nancy Drew), Laura Ingalls Wilder, etc. There seems to be a growing push for more "realistic" books. I know junior high kids reading Agatha Christie for the reader points. . . although I'm a fan of Christie, and I read them at that age, I was familiar with everything going on. . . I wouldn't want my children to read most of them---I'd handpick some for anyone under 14. . . like Parker Pyne and Tommy and Tuppence.

Homeschoolers seem to be better read these days, but then again, most of us farm kids didn't have more than three channels (one of which was PBS) growing up. . . so we needed SOMETHING to do when it was too nasty to play outside or after dark. . .

Feb 3rd 2013 new

Thanks so much for all of your input, everyone...I'm actually a mom of homeschoolers - well, 1 homeschooler left, the other successful as a sophmore in college. It's good to hear that you all appreciated the effort! (And thanks be to God, you're all so NORMAL! JK, JK!) laughing

And just to make you laugh, when people would say to me - "do your girls have any friends?" I would say all serious, "No, I lock them in the closet". Of course, if I said that today, I might have to talk to the police....but it was always good for a eyepopping

Feb 4th 2013 new

(Quote) Heather-294940 said: Thanks so much for all of your input, everyone...I'm actually a mom of homeschoolers - well...
(Quote) Heather-294940 said:

Thanks so much for all of your input, everyone...I'm actually a mom of homeschoolers - well, 1 homeschooler left, the other successful as a sophmore in college. It's good to hear that you all appreciated the effort! (And thanks be to God, you're all so NORMAL! JK, JK!)

And just to make you laugh, when people would say to me - "do your girls have any friends?" I would say all serious, "No, I lock them in the closet". Of course, if I said that today, I might have to talk to the police....but it was always good for a

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You'd be surprised, Heather, but there are a few families here that homeschool that ONLY permit interaction with children from their families, NO others. The girls wear cotton print and denim dress/jumper outfits and long braided hair until they are "out," and then they can wear their hair down and a few more modern clothing choices. . . and their kids can't do any outside activities---they have their own homeschool 4-H group. So in my area, there is a bit of a stereotype, but only because of those few families. Nothing wrong with modesty and traditional long hair, but being separatist (worshipping at homes, lack of inclusion for kids) is indeed unusual. . . and evokes comment.

Feb 7th 2013 new

Hi Lynn, We have people just like that in our area to! I find it to be particularly difficult to be painted with that same brush. I mean, someone once made derogatory comments toward my girls because I allow them to wear TROUSERS. I mean, seriously?? LOL

But, it's good to know that so many of you homeschoolers have growed up real good wink

Feb 8th 2013 new

(Quote) Heather-294940 said: Hi Lynn, We have people just like that in our area to! I find it to be particularly difficult t...
(Quote) Heather-294940 said:

Hi Lynn, We have people just like that in our area to! I find it to be particularly difficult to be painted with that same brush. I mean, someone once made derogatory comments toward my girls because I allow them to wear TROUSERS. I mean, seriously?? LOL

But, it's good to know that so many of you homeschoolers have growed up real good

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I know, why paint yourself in a negative light with such attire? Girls can still wear MODEST clothing (well, if they don't order much of it from a Junior's catalog) without looking like LHOP. I know many New Order Mennonites where the women wear modern pinned up hair, and when they aren't working outdoors or exercising, wear modern split skirts and over the knee skirts and dresses (Land's End type) without attracting attention. . . so why the emphasis on old school appearance? And then, the family that takes the cake, the girls (but not the boys) have to dress like that until they are 18, and when they are "out," can wear modest jewelery, get modern hairstyles (but at least to the shoulder), wear modern cosmetics, and modern modest clothing, including pants. What? You have to wear a dress until you're 18 and look dowdy but if you are available, you can wear jeans, a sweater, and pretty hairstyles??????? VERY ODD.

Glad not everyone likes that counter-culture standard.

May 30th 2013 new
I was home schooled. My parents homeschooled all of us and there are 11 siblings in our family so kudos to them for not killing a couple of us in their frustration along the way. :) Look up a video on youtube called A Homeschool Family. It is pretty good. Also, you might be a homschooler if cleaning your room is considered physical education.
May 30th 2013 new
I didn't homeschool my son but I did participate in a "Great Books" program at his school. We read "A Door in the Wall." I don't remember the author, but it was a wonderful book.
May 30th 2013 new
(quote) Jennifer-567618 said: Are there any other previous homeschoolers out there? :) You might have been a homeschooler if..... Your stack of library books to check out were taller than the librarian
Ahhhh yes!!!! I did Seton K-12, though I spent 9th grade in public school (and hated it!) I graduated from Seton in 2011, and yes, gosh there were sooooo many books that I had to read!! I do miss those days, though. :( Oh well, time to pass it on to my children if I have any! :)
May 30th 2013 new
I tried homeschooling my son (then 15) for a year. It was a disaster.
May 30th 2013 new
I homeschooled all 6 of my children during parts of their lives -- it all depended on what all was going on in our lives at the time, what interests they had that needed extra time, how motivated they were to study independently, etc. I also 'un-schooled' rather than using a pre-made curriculum. We made weekly visits to the library to find all sorts of books and resources and were the librarians' favorite family in each town where we lived. My 3 children who have graduated from high school were valedictorians and salutatorian so far, so however we did it, it worked!
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