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This room is for general discussion that doesn't specifically fit into one of the other CatholicMatch rooms. Topics should not be overly serious as this is to be more of a "cafe setting."

Saint Peter's Square was created so that more people could be in the presence of the Pope and was named after Saint Peter, one of Jesus's apostles.
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Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) John-746882 said: Hopefully we've all encountered special people in our lives who have helped us along the way, ...
(Quote) John-746882 said:

Hopefully we've all encountered special people in our lives who have helped us along the way, by their actions, by their prayer, by their example, or in some other way, to want to become better people ourselves. We have the examples of holiness in Church history, the example of Our Lady and St. Joseph, and of course Our Lord and Savior Jesus, and we can have their presence in our daily lives. We have the apostles, the many great canonized saints, the beatified blessed, and the venerable whose cause for canonization has been started. But who are the saints who may never be canonized, the ordinary people who made an extraordinary impact in your life and the lives of those they touched?

The question here is: Who is/are the person(s) in your life who you consider a saint? (Of course we don't presume them to be saints, so we pray for them.)

The loss of such a person can be very difficult. But we can turn to the words of St. Paul for comfort: "What eye has not seen, and ear has not heard, and what has not entered the human heart, what God has prepared for those who love him" 1 Corinthians 2: 9

It can be a "living" saint, or someone who has passed. Is it a parent or both parents, a grandparent, a child, a friend, an aunt or uncle, a member of the clergy, or a holy person you've encountered along the way? If you feel so inclined to share their story, please do.

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This is really food for thought, John.

I'm going to begin with a certain group of people to whom I've referred to as qualified for sainthood. That group consists of single parents. They work endlessly, even though they're bone tired, yet they persevere. This applies to both women and men. They are literally doing the work of both parents -- a tough enough situation even when there are two parents in the household. Many struggle financially, having foregone higher education for marriage, and now are working hard in lower paying jobs to make ends meet. To me this group of people deserves the utmost respect and encouragement -- and, of course, prayerful support. For many, their personal lives are on hold until the children are more self-sufficient.

To that end, I ask that when you come across a single parent, you acknowledge their efforts and struggles, letting them know they are not alone or forgotten.

Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) Meg-920823 said: I don't want to corner this thread but I have another: My pastor and spiritual director is suc...
(Quote) Meg-920823 said: I don't want to corner this thread but I have another:

My pastor and spiritual director is such a great example of Christ's love, He is strong and immovable in the Truths of Our Faith and yet he is one of the kindest, gentlest, and approachable men I have met. He truly has impacted my picture of Catholic manhood. His practice of the virtues is difficult to describe. The strong with the gentle is how I believe Christ on earth was,but I never could really picture it. Father opened that door for me. His guidance through very rough times was Christ's. I know that. Father gives his life for the Church and does it with such warmth, strength and dignity. He is especially loved by the teens in our Parish. He continues to affect many, many lives. He is humble and realistic about the human condition as he continues to point to God and His Divine Mercy.

I will forever thank Our Lord for providing this blessing in my life and I often tear up,when I think of the spiritual direction and wisdom he has gives
--hide--



Meg, Please post as much as you can think of! You're not cornering it and I love the stories of these people who try. I'd love to see this thread fill up. Your pastor pointing to the Divine Mercy-- I think it's no coincidence Divine Mercy devotion and recognition was elevated in these days with all we face. Any man or woman who seeks or recommends it is a wise person in my book. Another great example Meg. Keep 'em coming! Thank you.

Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) John-146319 said: John, I'm thinking you should have titled this thread People We Think Are Saints (Othe...
(Quote) John-146319 said:

John, I'm thinking you should have titled this thread People We Think Are Saints (Other Than Your Mom)

Having said that, well....my mom...

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I can relate John. Moms take the cake in the saints category in my book.

Jan 22nd 2013 new
(Quote) John-746882 said: Meg, Please post as much as you can think of! You're not cornering it and I love the stories o...
(Quote) John-746882 said:




Meg, Please post as much as you can think of! You're not cornering it and I love the stories of these people who try. I'd love to see this thread fill up. Your pastor pointing to the Divine Mercy-- I think it's no coincidence Divine Mercy devotion and recognition was elevated in these days with all we face. Any man or woman who seeks or recommends it is a wise person in my book. Another great example Meg. Keep 'em coming! Thank you.

--hide--
I will continue with my mom. She grew up in Ireland and it was a tough life. Her brother had cancer when he was 19 and was in a hospital that was bike riding distance. Because she was a girl and couldn't work like her brothers on the farm, she was brought to the center of town where a number of girls were there as well, they all stood on selected stones and farmers would choose which girl they wanted to help their wives or take care of children. She was 14. She worked on Harmon's farm and would send all her salary home for the good of her family. She would whitewash Harmon's house inside and out, milk cows, take care of the pigs, chickens, and three children, the cooking and repairing of clothes do whatever Harmon's wife could thinks of to fill her spare time. On the occasional day off, her dad would ride his bike to pick her up and she would be on the handlebar until they reached the hospital. She worked on two other farms and the opportunity came for her to be sponsored to come to America. (That is a story for another time). On entering the USA Ellis Island to Hungry Hill, she lived with her aunt and uncle and their 5 kids. She lost her brother Ned the first month she was here and moved out of that house to room with a couple nurses downtown. She worked in the bakery and met my dad as you may have read in my thread, John. Their life was not an easy one either but she raised us four kids with all the love and laughter she could give. Her only wish when we were in school was that we did our best and she never would be disappointed. Well of course we wanted her to be proud of us ...we all were honor roll students and graduated top of our classes, well, first, 18 th, 12 th, and 27th. If we did disappoint her and there were occasions, she would cry and the world stopped. She was a companion, a champion if that is what you needed, a confidant, an advisor, a great mother. She was an angel. She believed in God above all, prayed with us and would talk of the day she would sit with with Jesus. She was dying in the hospital, she had congestive heart failure and was in the step down unit. We had her propped up with pillows and the fan blowing on her. She had dyspnea and you could hear her coarse respirations. She would be in and out of consciousness but the miracle was when she opened her eyes, no problem breathing with her beautiful smile and blue eyes and looked at each of us. She went around the bed saying our name and how much she loved us and how much fun she had with us all, how proud she was that we were her beautiful children. Her aura was saintly and we laughed and cried in that glorious time. She slipped back into a sleep and never woke again. It was two days until she left this world with a smile if you can believe that and peace was hers. Every year on her anniversary, we sit down with a cup of tea and have a conference call so we can all talk and say our favorite memory of Mom. It is a tribute because some of the stories are so darn funny and some were not funny when they happened but we can see the humor now that we are all adults. I miss you Mom! Your loving and favorite daughter, Eileen
Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) Daniel-634934 said: My friend Daviette who is dying of cancer. She is always concerned about the needs of others ins...
(Quote) Daniel-634934 said:

My friend Daviette who is dying of cancer. She is always concerned about the needs of others instead of herself. Her example makes me get teary eyed!

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God bless your friend Daviette and may the Divine Mercy give her comfort. theheart rosary
Thank you Daniel.

Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) Jim-149694 said: My God man! A pretzel thief! And we all know the recidicism rate for the pretzel-addicted ...
(Quote) Jim-149694 said:

My God man! A pretzel thief! And we all know the recidicism rate for the pretzel-addicted -- 100%! I appreciate your honesty but this is not the kind of thing you tell a girl on the first date.

It's a gateway savory. Though your story is affecting ... we cannot have you going through life doing things in exchange for affectual savors!

I have so many stories of the good Sisters being patient with little boys. That business with the smoke bomb over the convent wall ... well, we all know the problems that come to a fellow when he falls in with evil companions. Especially slow runners who crack under pressure and reveal their accompli -- innocent companions.

To this day when I see one of my boys smiling I think, "Ha -- there's a fellow who got a way Scot free. That's good -- the police won't be calling me."

Anybody else have grade school stories to share? They needn't be as grim as John's. Terrible stuff.

:')

NC Jim

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Hey NC Jim, Too late I already shared that story. Fortunately she's sticking with me. Funny I can't remember what I did yesterday, but 40 years later I still remember the pretzel incident.

Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) Ray-566531 said: This is really food for thought, John. I'm going to begin with a certain group of people...
(Quote) Ray-566531 said:

This is really food for thought, John.

I'm going to begin with a certain group of people to whom I've referred to as qualified for sainthood. That group consists of single parents. They work endlessly, even though they're bone tired, yet they persevere. This applies to both women and men. They are literally doing the work of both parents -- a tough enough situation even when there are two parents in the household. Many struggle financially, having foregone higher education for marriage, and now are working hard in lower paying jobs to make ends meet. To me this group of people deserves the utmost respect and encouragement -- and, of course, prayerful support. For many, their personal lives are on hold until the children are more self-sufficient.

To that end, I ask that when you come across a single parent, you acknowledge their efforts and struggles, letting them know they are not alone or forgotten.

--hide--


Amen Ray! Since mothers are being mentioned in the thread today, I'll talk about my own just for a second to echo your point. When she lost my Dad to illness, even before he passed she in effect had to raise the younger kids, and the older kids, by herself. Later on she would say that she couldn't be both mom and dad to the kids. She came to that realization that she could only be what she was, a mother.

I'm with you, single parents working and struggling to raise their kids are heroic. Thank you Ray.




Jan 22nd 2013 new

(Quote) Jim-149694 said: (Quote) John-746882 said: Hey NC Jim,Your post reminds me of when I ...
(Quote) Jim-149694 said:

Quote:
John-746882 said:

Hey NC Jim,

Your post reminds me of when I was in first grade, Notre Dame Catholic school in NJ where I grew up. The Sisters of St. Joseph there appointed me the pretzel boy. I was responsible for delivering the hot pretzels to the seventh and eighth grade kids on the basement level of the school. I was to collect one dime for each pretzel. Well one day, I was particularly hungry. I proceeded with the pretzels down the hall and into the stairwell, where I was out of sight of everyone. Well wouldn't you know it an eighth grader bursts into the stairwell as I'm biting into one of those salty pretzels. I almost choked on the thing. He told me not to worry about it. I guess the Sisters didn't have a strong accounting of the pretzels and the dimes collected, because I was certainly short one dime that day. Isn't it funny how I still remember that to this day.

John


My God man! A pretzel thief! And we all know the recidicism rate for the pretzel-addicted -- 100%! I appreciate your honesty but this is not the kind of thing you tell a girl on the first date.

It's a gateway savory. Though your story is affecting ... we cannot have you going through life doing things in exchange for affectual savors!

I have so many stories of the good Sisters being patient with little boys. That business with the smoke bomb over the convent wall ... well, we all know the problems that come to a fellow when he falls in with evil companions. Especially slow runners who crack under pressure and reveal their accompli -- innocent companions.

To this day when I see one of my boys smiling I think, "Ha -- there's a fellow who got a way Scot free. That's good -- the police won't be calling me."

Anybody else have grade school stories to share? They needn't be as grim as John's. Terrible stuff.

:')

NC Jim

--hide--
Yeah John, I have to agree with Jim here. There's a special level in Purgatory reserved for pretzel thieves, just above the level where they send the playground bullies who shook kids down for their lunch money and just below the level reserved for those kids who didn't return their library books. Imagine yourself before St. Peter as he reviews your life checklist and is about to approve your entry through the pearly gates when his eye catches a discrepancy in the ledger.

"Well, John" he'll say, pushing his halo back on his head as he narrows his gaze at you. "It appears that you owe 10 cents to Notre Dame Catholic School in Jersey for the purchase of one, purloined pretzel. Do you have that 10 cents on you?" Wide-eyed, you fumble through your pockets before you realize that A: Your new heavenly robes don't have pockets, and B: You really can't take it with you, not even a dime.

Make good on it now, John! Mail a check for 10 cents to Notre Dame Catholic School and never look back! eyepopping

Jan 22nd 2013 new

Oh my Eileen. I am awestruck. Speechless. Thank you.

John

Jan 22nd 2013 new

John,
But before you and NC Jim judge me, let me explain. I was a skinny kid and one of six at the time, later to be eight of us, and I was really hungry that day. Perhaps I hadn't been fed a proper breakfast. The details are fuzzy right now.

Who am I kiddin? I'm no good.

I feel a little like Jean Valjean. 40 years later I'm running from swiping a pretzel.

John

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