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Devoted to discussion pertaining to those issues which are specifically relevant to people under 45. Topics must have a specific perspective of people in this age group for it to be on topic.

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Feb 4th 2013 new

I went to library school to get my master's one course at a time at night, and worked FT during the days. I also had some online courses when necessary. Looking back, I don't know how I did it, but I'm glad I did. Even though I did socialize with groups, there were many weekends I had to wake up early Saturday mornings and do homework.(It helps that I am an early bird.) I didn't travel much. It helps to be very disciplined with time when going to school and working.:)



Feb 5th 2013 new

I'm not on here trolling for dates, I'm here for the forums, but I saw your post and had five points for your answer.


1) Caffeine and sleep deprivation are not time management secrets.
2) I am so lucky to have found a job on the campus I'm attending as a graduate assistant. Before that, I was interning with the foodservice provider for a college so I had flexible hours. Otherwise, I suppose I would consume 2-3 times the amount of coffee I do now.
3) They let you get away with making B averages in graduate school; however, if you drop below a B in a lot of programs, you're out of the program.
4) I'm always one paper away from losing my B average.
5) Perhaps there's a reason a lot of my social interaction is online rather than in real life ...oh yes, it's because I use this as a break between researching for papers.

Feb 5th 2013 new

What I don't understand is how people can go back to school FT without working. I have people tell me all the time "can't find a job? get a loan and go back to school!"

I mean: I have a mortgage...my expenses are $1,500/mo (I'm living on savings right now) - I've taken classes while working, sure, but when people say I should go back FT without work, or with a PT job, it's like...HOW am I supposed to do that with my expenses?? Then they tell me "you just don't want to" or "you're holding yourself back" um NO, I literally cannot go to school while I have a mortgage to pay- I need a job THEN school, not school and MAYBE a job. IDGI rolling eyes

Feb 5th 2013 new

thanks for your posts Katherine.

I often wonder...I think some in our generation go back b/c their friends are going back; some go to vocational schools (which have good career prospects but are non-traditional).

What is often unsaid is the amount of loans, and people are banking on grad schools to get them good jobs so they can pay off the loans fast. I am in journalism and although I got a job right away out of college in 06 w/a BS degree only, it is not a high-paying job and long-term I don't know how long the paper will last.

Feb 5th 2013 new

Mary:

One thing nobody told me about grad school - apply to the college as a worker first, then as a student. There are a lot of campus jobs like custodial, maintenance, dorm overseers, secretaries, etcetera. You put your resume in for that. THEN you apply to the school. What happens is they'll hire you on in positions that let you study at a lot of places, or on shifts that don't conflict with classes. I am actually on the state's health insurance because I'm contracted to work for the university, and I was able to roll over my IRA from my old job to my new one.

Another good possibility for jobs that don't conflict with school: the subcontractors, usually either Sodexo, Aramark, Compass, or at some schools there are more than one of these contractors around.

Yeah, there still are a lot of loans though. I'm lucky in that my undergraduate was scholarship, or else I couldn't possibly consider even trying for a master's right now.

Feb 5th 2013 new

(Quote) Katherine-868943 said: Mary:One thing nobody told me about grad school - apply to the college as a worker fi...
(Quote) Katherine-868943 said:

Mary:

One thing nobody told me about grad school - apply to the college as a worker first, then as a student. There are a lot of campus jobs like custodial, maintenance, dorm overseers, secretaries, etcetera. You put your resume in for that. THEN you apply to the school. What happens is they'll hire you on in positions that let you study at a lot of places, or on shifts that don't conflict with classes. I am actually on the state's health insurance because I'm contracted to work for the university, and I was able to roll over my IRA from my old job to my new one.

Another good possibility for jobs that don't conflict with school: the subcontractors, usually either Sodexo, Aramark, Compass, or at some schools there are more than one of these contractors around.

Yeah, there still are a lot of loans though. I'm lucky in that my undergraduate was scholarship, or else I couldn't possibly consider even trying for a master's right now.

--hide--

thanks for the tip. The problem is, what if you don't have experience doing custodial work, etc. even when applying for jobs w/either the college or the subcontractors? Should you get a job doing custodial work elsewhere first, then apply to the college/subcontractor, then get into grad school?

Feb 5th 2013 new

Or, katherine, and I forgot to put this in...should you just be networking with the college from the work angle and then try to get in?

Feb 5th 2013 new

Don't worry about the experience - seems to be the least considered thing on that. There are interviews and such, of course, but honestly they're not overly concerned if you've run printers before or whatever on the campus jobs.

It's strange, but part of being a returning student is convincing admissions that you can make that work experience work for you, so you end up getting recommendation letter and such anyway. I would say the job seeking and application are probably concurrent.

Feb 6th 2013 new

(Quote) Mary-583970 said: What I don't understand is how people can go back to school FT without working. I have people ...
(Quote) Mary-583970 said:

What I don't understand is how people can go back to school FT without working. I have people tell me all the time "can't find a job? get a loan and go back to school!"

I mean: I have a mortgage...my expenses are $1,500/mo (I'm living on savings right now) - I've taken classes while working, sure, but when people say I should go back FT without work, or with a PT job, it's like...HOW am I supposed to do that with my expenses?? Then they tell me "you just don't want to" or "you're holding yourself back" um NO, I literally cannot go to school while I have a mortgage to pay- I need a job THEN school, not school and MAYBE a job. IDGI

--hide--


Hi Mary and others who may be considering graduate school! Be sure it is something you really want to do with your life. Alot of us who lost our jobs early in the recession thought graduate school would be the answer. We'd come out better for it in the end. That's not always the case! Regardless of what you've been doing during your time away from the workforce, you've still been away from the workforce. And the stigma is still there! It doesn't mean you can't get another job. Unfortunately, however, you may not even get the job you were qualified for before you were let go from the first one - let alone one that is worthy of your advanced education. Plus, you've now got a boatload of student loans. I'm not saying don't do it. I'm just saying think about it first! Chelle

Feb 6th 2013 new

(Quote) Josh-196444 said: Is it me, or does it seem like most CM members have grad. degrees or are pursuing them, and yet st...
(Quote) Josh-196444 said:

Is it me, or does it seem like most CM members have grad. degrees or are pursuing them, and yet still find time to travel/hold down a job?

My question is--what are your time management secrets that enable you do live a life like that? That is impressive. Most of the members I've browsed are graduates or are pursuing their MA/PhD/other advanced degrees, etc.

--hide--

Josh, it isn't easy, but it comes down to how badly you want it and you just take advantage of every moment you can. I went back to school in 2002 with four kiddos and a husband and I was the DRE at our parish and the Life Teen Coordinator. We also fostered between 2 and 5 teen boys during this time. I was lucky that my husband was staunchly behind me going back to school. I went directly into the Masters after completing my BA and completed it in two years then directly into the PhD program. I'm ABD now and have a year or so left, mostly technical things, completing the research and writing it up.

I spent most Sundays after Mass locked in the bedroom completing reading. I have pulled lots of late nights and I have toted books, and articles to read all over the place, taking moments in waiting rooms, sitting in the car during softball practices, studying in between classes, etc. Take excellent notes, involve yourself in discussions both in and out of class, and take advantage of every opportunity you can. Present at conferences, even if you can't attend, go. There are often travel grants for those presenting, not always funding if you aren't, but still try to go. Grad students are great at carpooling and everyone piling into a hotel room to make it affordable.

I actually find it more difficult now that I have completed all of my course work, I did better when I was carrying nine hours a semester in grad school, with organizing my time. I carried 18 hours every semester as an undergrad. I have also had departmental or research funding throughout grad school, not a ton of money but generally doable. It comes down to being disciplined and taking advantage of every moment you can.

One of the best things you can do in grad school is network with members of the older cohorts, hash out things like theory and ideas, also get to know and interact with your professors, some departments are more conducive to this than others. I've been lucky, in that my department considers grad students to be junior colleagues rather than just students and all of the faculty have taken interest in engaging and encouraging and interacting. Most of my travel has come about because of school. I have been to Canada twice, Peru once, several other states to work and or to present. I have been asked to give guest lectures and I have spoken to community groups as well. I have made connections with other researchers and professors in Nebraska, Texas, Maine, Copenhagen, Australia, Michigan, etc.

Grad school is tough and its demanding, sometimes the reading for one class can be three or four hundred pages a week, plus writing. It is not for the faint at heart and it is not for someone who isn't absolutely certain they want to do this. And, sometimes even those who want to do it find it too demanding. You will still have a life, much of it will be centered around grad school, your department and your cohort.

Having said all of that lol, I have no regrets at all and I would do it again without a second thought. The intellectual engagement, the physical challenges (like reading 400 pages a class) and the ability to share ideas and thoughts and discover new and wondrous things, has been more than worth it.

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