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This room is dedicated to those who are facing the challenge of raising children without the support of a spouse. This is a place to share ideas and lend mutual support.

Saint Rita is known to be a patroness for abused wives and mourning women.
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Feb 6th 2013 new

(Quote) Patrick-624504 said: The HPV vaccine is not for males, but if you come across that situation then the girl ...
(Quote) Patrick-624504 said:

The HPV vaccine is not for males, but if you come across that situation then the girl needs to get the vaccination though its better she has it in puberty. But cervical cancer is NOT contagious and to date no conclusive or anecdotal evidence HPV has an adverse effect on men except as herpes

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Herpes simplex viruses are the cause of Herpes, HPV is human papilloma virus which prompts warts/genital warts. HPV vaccine is now available for boys as well and there is some evidence for increased penile cancer with HPV infection. Cervical cancer may not be contagious but HPV is, as is Herpes.

Feb 6th 2013 new

to be more precise gential warts are the manifestation of an infection with human papilloma virus. And, they are finding links to throat cancers as well. Something that has been increasing with the increase in behaviors that increase the risk of exposure.

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) Lauren-927923 said: to be more precise gential warts are the manifestation of an infection with human papilloma viru...
(Quote) Lauren-927923 said:

to be more precise gential warts are the manifestation of an infection with human papilloma virus. And, they are finding links to throat cancers as well. Something that has been increasing with the increase in behaviors that increase the risk of exposure.

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Lauren, simple stated and well spoken. Kids today....how should we phrase it....don't do things the way we did in Jr. High...


I think if anything, the throat cancer/HPV link may be an even bigger issue than these other cancers. I know now quite a few (non-smoking) people who are throat cancer survivors. Not a fun one to have...(By the way these were non-promiscuous, married people).

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) David-364112 said: Oh come on Pat. I say, that's not cricket. Why be a party pooper? Don't use ...
(Quote) David-364112 said:


Oh come on Pat. I say, that's not cricket. Why be a party pooper? Don't use the sharp pin of logic/common sense to burst the happy bubble of flaming hysterical paranoia and righteous indignation.


How getting a vaccine equates to giving a child license to have sex is beyond my feeble powers of comprehension. I'm doing my dim-bulb best to fathom it but keep falling short. But who am I to derail the emotional gymnastics that go on display whenever sex is mentioned in here?


For what it's worth, I'm beef-witted and avoid paranoid anti-vaccine websites, but here's my take on this issue. It's a good idea to have our teens vaccinated for HPV because: (1) in most states it's the law (the last thign we need is some over-zealous moron from DCFS hauling us into court); (2) there's always a chance that our kids will be exposed to this virus in young adulthood so they should be protected; and (3) it gives parents an opportunity to discuss premarital sex and its potentially dire consequences with their children. (#3 alone is worth getting the vaccine.)



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Sorry mate my mistake, I apologise to all those in need of rampent hysteria. I'm a bad bad boy mischievous

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) Patricia-29176 said: Patrick, are you aware, that a cure for Hepatitis C is within sight? The new drugs whic...
(Quote) Patricia-29176 said:



Patrick, are you aware, that a cure for Hepatitis C is within sight? The new drugs which are in trials now in the US/Canada/Europe have had amazing results (although not widely tested yet in those who have progressed to cirrhosis). These will likely hit the market in the U.S. by years-end. I've been to a couple CME's about this(I'm a retired physician) and I have never seen the hepatologists and infectious disease specialists so excited in my life. At the conference up in Toronto this year, they were literally jumping for joy! They are actually now leaving it up to newly diagnosed patients whether to start treatment now (with old drugs) or wait until these hit the market. And, it's only 1-2 drugs for a relatively short treatment period (I think 3-6months tops). They also think this is just the beginning of more good news, as in the limited trials on the more advanced cases, there seemed to be about 50% cure rates. And, yes they are referring to this as a CURE for Hep C! They expect the drugs to hit the Canadian market about a year after they hit the U.S. market. Not sure when it would hit your market (perhaps the same as Canada?) So, let us thank God that it appears that a cure for Hep C is here (and so then, it would be good to recommend everyone be tested for Hep C so they could then be treated which I believe is going to happen in the U.S. if the recommendation is not already in place - since many people have Hep C and don't know it because they are asymptomatic.)

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Yes thank Patrica I do live in hope, unfortunately the human trials have not reached the ends of the earth yet, but are going through the regulatory process. My Immunologist has me listed, but you know paperwork, you have to qualify for the trial before you can have it, so I wait and wait and watch my LFTs. I got mine curtesy of a careless nurse reusing a needle!!!!

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) Chelsea-743484 said: www.cdc.gov the CDC points...
(Quote) Chelsea-743484 said:



www.cdc.gov

As the CDC points out: neither HPV vaccine prevents any cancer absolutely. Sexually active girls and women are to be continually screened even after the vaccine, by CDC recommendation, for cervical cancers.

Also, you're SOL of you're over the age of 26 and you get the vaccine, since the CDC reports that clinical trials up to this point have shown limited to no positive effect against HPV in women vaccinated.

The CDC also points out that there are other ways to prevent MOST cervical cancers (just like the vaccine when applied to the right age groups) without getting the vaccine.

The HPV types that both vaccines target are those which are sexually transmitted, which means that those people who are interested in certainly and absolutely preventing cancers resulting from those HPV types should, as the CDC says, avoid all sexual activity.


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Nothing is 100% gauranteed especially in Medicine but that doesnt mean you shouldnt have the vaccine. Again the vaccine DOESNT come with a 100% guarntee but 99% is better than the disease.

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) Maria-674183 said: Since you asked for thoughts: HPV is a horrible disease. This vaccine prevents it (not all) and i...
(Quote) Maria-674183 said:

Since you asked for thoughts: HPV is a horrible disease. This vaccine prevents it (not all) and is marvelous. Let's face it...he will have sex at some time in his life and this just prevents the spread of it. This disease presents itself as warts....but they are sometimes not seen. Most people do not know they have this disease and then they spread it. I think that you should read whatever you can to make a more informed decision rather than deciding that this will tell him to have sex. Sex is a part of life unless he is going to be a priest or celibate life. This vaccine does not prevent against all varieties of this disease so let him know that.....and educate him. My parents did not talk of sex. These things were unknown in my generation and the sexual revolutions spread it all around. Our ignorance left us wounded for life. That is just another way of thinking that this germs do exist all over without even knowing. These warts can present inside the vagina unseen, etc.


www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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As you say he will have sex sometime as God commanded go forth and multiply.

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) Andrew-899116 said: After reviewing the British Colombia article in question, I can perhaps explain to our readers that car...
(Quote) Andrew-899116 said: After reviewing the British Colombia article in question, I can perhaps explain to our readers that careful scrutiny of the inclusion criteria for their review showed inclusion of only small scale clinical trial numbers and excludes large amounts of post -market data. The statistical methods used are inferior in power to the meta-analyses I have shared previously and the conclusion is heavily editorialized. A previous poster made a good point in that a Review study published by an Ophthalmology department no less lacks the heft of a CDC multi-center trial and review. In response to the previous poster's "disconcertment" I would say that I am not ignoring this particular study. In fact it's aim seems to be to temper specific claims such as the 70% reduction in cervical cancer rates. That number however is impossible to validate in a clinical trial as the only way to design such a study would be to compare a vaccinated and unvaccinated group while exposing both strains to HPV which is clearly unethical. For this reason studying epidemiological data for cervical cancer rates (and a change in response to vaccination) will only ever be correlational without any ability to sort out other confounding population variables. Correlation is not equal to causation. We know that HPV causes cancer and we know the vaccine is protective against HPV. The correlation between these in driving, vaccination is sound, the article simply tempers exaggerated claims of
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Weeel you could design a trial, I am not saying I would agree with it or encourage it, but it has been done before. That is use the Developed world against the Developing world. Vaccinate the developed world, and not the developing world and after a couple of years, say 10 years compare cancer rates. As I say not exactly PC or ethical but it has been done before.

1962 to 1973 the effect of "Agent Orange" which is a compound of many substances most are responsible for birth defects and cancers.

or the US Army tests in 1950s of PCP on servicemen.

so it does have a historical place. And Lister tested His smallpox on himself!!!!!!!!!

Just a thought

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) Miriam-897989 said: I was on the fence about this for my 12 year old daughter.... but the more i think about it, its...
(Quote) Miriam-897989 said:

I was on the fence about this for my 12 year old daughter.... but the more i think about it, its not such much saying .. you got a shot, go have sex. They can stay a virgin until there wedding night, and their partner might have sleeped with someone before. Boys are the ones who carry the disease. If it can prevent cervical cancer... which is what HPV can turn into... then I say Yes

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A good man is a vector for all sorts of diseases!!!!! But seriously you are correct far better to protect your daughter than leave it chance or fate

Feb 7th 2013 new

(Quote) Laura-695247 said: Wrong. Your link is to the home page at WHO. It did not link to this specific topic....
(Quote) Laura-695247 said:


Wrong. Your link is to the home page at WHO. It did not link to this specific topic.


In the search link on WHO you yourself can type in Throat Cancer/HPV...and get information such as this, that says they are finding a link between HPV and throat cancer.

www.who.int


I live in the real work...and here is my real work experience...my friend and I were swimming with a manatee in Florida. We asked the Park Ranger why this specific manatee was really bumpy. He said this manatee picked in HPV from humans. Pretty sad. There are many strains. Not all cancerous. But don't take lightly this virus.

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Sorry if you couldnt find it but I did say you would have to search. I have read NO peer reviewed studies that support the connection

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